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Sorry if this is a lame question but I am looking to diversity some of my food supply and have been browsing the Mointain House website and have some odd questions.

1) The MH site shows the servings per #10 can but how big or what are the approx dimensions of the cans themselves?

2) If you utilize the #10 can for meals do you just use a 1 cup scoop to measure the portions, etc to cook properly with directions for food prep on the side of the can?

3) All the MH products show how many cups/servings are per pouch/can. Say with the chili Mac beef, is one cup/serving much for the average sized man? I understand that in a situation that is bad enough where I would have to resort to eating my stored supplies I won't be eating like I'm at the local Chop House on a Saturday night but you will also need to make sure you have enough food/calories to sustain yourself as I'd imagine my daily calorie burn from doing activities/labor/chores/surviving will go up dramatically.

Thanks for the replies as I'm tryi g to figure out what may he the best quants to order. Btw, the MH will not be my only source for SHTF food, just another type of stored food to diversify with.:thumb:
 

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I and many others like to store individual ingredients, as they offer the most diversity and nutrition. That said, MH has great products and serve an important part to a lot of preppers.

1) #10 cans contain 12 cups. Here is a chart with can sizes: http://homecooking.about.com/library/archive/blhelp7.htm

2) Watch the serving size, as they usually are a bit slim. And yes, you just scoop an amount out per the directions.

3)You have to base daily intake off of calories, period. Some food suppliers are getting a little more realistic in stating the 'true' value of the foods they offer but, it is still up to the buyer to figure these things out. It takes a minimum of 2200 calories a day, for a working man just to maintain.
If you ever buy a 'package' you have to cut out sugar in things like drink mixes when calculating caloric needs. Empty calories don't count when one wants to maintain health.
 

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+1 on storing ingredients. Of course, that means learning to use the ingredients. If you view cooking like any other skill you might need one day (just like shooting, bushcrafts, forging, whatever you like,) then you may give it the attention it deserves, and end up much healthier for your trouble. Most of the packaged foods are so packed with salt, you'd have to be digging ditches on 100+F afternoons to process it out properly.
 

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#10 can but how big or what are the approx dimensions of the cans themselves?
Just for a fast mental visual think of a gallon paint can. Then think a wee bit smaller.

Volume wise a #10 holds almost 110 fluid ounces and a gallon is 128. The extra 18 ounces in a gallon going around the perimeter isn't a lot of space visually, so the two cans look fairly close.

Link to can industry data website: http://www.cancentral.com/standard.cfm

The "avoir oz" means fluid ounces under the normal "English" system as opposed to the Imperial system like Brits and Canadians use.
 
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From what I have seen, The freeze dried serving sizes are usually about 1/2 of the calories needed for a standard meal. So If they say 10 servings per #10 can divide by half. I think they make the serving size so small so that you think the price for the freeze dried food is not so expensive. If a $30 can of food only gives you 5 meals instead of the 10 claimed than your price per meal is $6 versus $3.
 

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I have eaten the Mountain House pouches many times, never tried any of the #10 cans but I do have them in my preps.

As far as serving size goes, I would count on 2 cups per meal, unless you're supplementing with something else. The pouches are usually 2 or 2.5 cups and state "2 servings" on the side of the package. In my experience, one pouch isn't even close to satisfying for two hungry hikers. After a day in the bush, I'll eat a Mountain House pouch, and then some.
 

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Without a Plastic Snap-Lid, a #10 Can measures (Outside Dimensions) - 6 and One-Eighths Inches in Diameter, and Seven Inches Tall. These measurements are from LDS Stores can. I do not know how much +/- there is in the Standard.
 

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MH Serving Size

...
3) All the MH products show how many cups/servings are per pouch/can. Say with the chili Mac beef, is one cup/serving much for the average sized man?
...
Thanks for the replies as I'm tryi g to figure out what may he the best quants to order. Btw, the MH will not be my only source for SHTF food, just another type of stored food to diversify with.:thumb:
I agree with what the other folks have said: always go by calories.

At Mountain House, we use USDA "Reference Amount Customarily Consumed" (or "RACC") as the "serving size", since this allows consumers to compare to other companies that use RACC. This is generally a 1 cup "serving" for most of our entrees, but can be less for some items (e.g., granola is 1/2 cup, scrambled eggs w/ham and peppers are 3/4 cup, etc.) The servings per can vary, but should all be available at www.mountainhouse.com or your favorite vendor's website.

But there are three important things to consider:

1) Your nutrition needs probably vary from a standard "serving" size, based on metabolism, activity level, etc. Plan for your caloric needs, not what any given brand says is a "serving".

2) Many brands -- including Mountain House -- sell "entrees", not "meals". You can absolutely get enough calories from MH entrees, if you eat enough. But even we would recommend mixing things up a bit with diversified options. Have a home-grown salad on the side, add some extra whole wheat pasta to your chili mac, break out the canned peaches from last year's harvest, etc. This will help you tailor your food supply to your nutritional and budgetary needs and help avoid appetite fatigue.

3) Buyer beware. Read those labels carefully, folks. Not every company uses RACC values to help you compare, and some can be misleading. That "4-serving" pouch of "roasted chicken" from Brand X might have 4 x 11g "servings" of chicken at a mere 50 calories per "serving". Look a bit closer at the nutrition panel and you'll see that 9g of protein at 4 cal/gram plus 0.5 cal fat at 9 cal/gram gives you a total of 40.5 calories, or ~20% less than the claimed 50 calories.

Our advice is to actually taste the food before you buy in bulk. And if you have kids, make sure they taste it, too. (No sense in spending $$$ on food you don't like.)

Then calculate $/calorie of the foods you do like and purchase according to your budget. Get a mixture of "just add water" foods for emergency needs and supplement with less expensive dried staples (e.g., beans, rice, pasta) and canned goods. And don't forget the spices!

While we clearly hope that you'll give MH a try, the most important thing is to provide food and comfort to your family in times of need. If your tastes run to The Other Guys, that's OK, too. We can agree to disagree... :)
 

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Thanks all. Lots a great rplies that answered everything I needed. Gonna go get some sample from my local supplier and see what tastes good then order appropriately. Have heard great reviews on MH products so our family may have to have a SHTF dinner rather than the once a month "breakfast for dinner" meal. My boy will thinks it's cool. The wifey, she'll go along with it.
 

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Have heard great reviews on MH products so our family may have to have a SHTF dinner rather than the once a month "breakfast for dinner" meal. My boy will thinks it's cool. The wifey, she'll go along with it.
MH does make good stuff. It's not cheap and few people can load up a lot in a hurry without being a banker by day. But it can be a good part of an overall LTS plan if you read the threads here and learn what other good LTS options people have tested. You can lurk this one single board for a month of evenings and easily move from LTS food n00b to having a very good idea of what you are doing.
 
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I LOVE MH, wish I could afford to buy more of it. I buy the mylar bag meals since I live alone, and since they store for quite some time, I try to refrain from eating them...saving them for later...but every now and again i will eat one. I esp love the beef stroganof, cant get enough of it!
 

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Can storage

Does anyone have experience or technical knowledge about the viability of storing any size cans on the side versus standing on the end?

In my most economical storage areas I can get a lot more stored if I lay the cans on their sides. They stack better within the container and there is less wasted space. Cans that are not tapered at the bottom fall all over the place.

Thanks in advance.
 

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It's the only way to truly level the playing field between the brands and to know what you're actually getting for your money.
 

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Does anyone have experience or technical knowledge about the viability of storing any size cans on the side versus standing on the end?
Mine are also stacked on the side inside chest freezers that have been converted to 'chest refrigerators' via a thermostat and maintained at a steady 42 degrees F storage temperature.

Havent noticed anything out of the ordinary with the #10 cans after three years. Can't see that orientation of the can would make any difference as the metal gauge is the same all around.
 

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Does anyone have experience or technical knowledge about the viability of storing any size cans on the side versus standing on the end?

In my most economical storage areas I can get a lot more stored if I lay the cans on their sides. They stack better within the container and there is less wasted space. Cans that are not tapered at the bottom fall all over the place.

Thanks in advance.
Storing cans on their side is fine. A lot of the can storage solutions out there do that very thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Again, thanks for all the replies. Just had my birthday last week and got an REI gift card. They were having a big sale the last couple days so I picked up 25 pouches of various MH meals for approx $110.
 
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