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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

Looking to purchase and mod my first 10/22 as a light weight rifle I can EDC (when legal of course). Want to have an all around rifle, no 5.56 or 308 needed, that I can grab and go when Im on the go (or SHTF and Im at the grocery store/work)

Wondering first of all if going with the alloy steel or stainless barrel would be best. Wondering about accuracy and barrel heating up. If I need in the future I could camo cling wrap the barrel or Duracoat it.

Also Im thinking about replacing factory parts with a Volquartsen bolt release and target hammer kit(Also Stainless or Alloy?), recoil buffer, and Target Rifle Trigger with trigger over travel screw. Any other inexpensive, but needed mods I should consider? Plan on sticking with the factory stock for abit, but then maybe getting a Butler Creek side folder back packers stock.

Any and all help would be much appreciated. Please not haters.
 

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keep your powder dry
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before this is redirected.

(and from another 10/22 lover)

I replaced my takedown screw, recoil buffer, extractor, with Volquartsen parts. And added a Wolff reduced trigger springs kit. Wasnt a lot of money, maybe $50 total. Made an already great gun super awesome. I would get stainless, because the newer krinkle-paint "blued" barrels leave me with a sour taste in my mouth. Mine is a actual blued from 2006. And unlike new ones, mine also has the aluminum trigger assembly, instead of plastic.

Be aware that the stainless 10/22 has a painted-on finish receiver -- its not stainless per se. Only the barrel is stainless.
 

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Hello all,

Looking to purchase and mod my first 10/22 as a light weight rifle I can EDC (when legal of course). Want to have an all around rifle, no 5.56 or 308 needed, that I can grab and go when Im on the go (or SHTF and Im at the grocery store/work)

Wondering first of all if going with the alloy steel or stainless barrel would be best. Wondering about accuracy and barrel heating up. If I need in the future I could camo cling wrap the barrel or Duracoat it.

Also Im thinking about replacing factory parts with a Volquartsen bolt release and target hammer kit(Also Stainless or Alloy?), recoil buffer, and Target Rifle Trigger with trigger over travel screw. Any other inexpensive, but needed mods I should consider? Plan on sticking with the factory stock for abit, but then maybe getting a Butler Creek side folder back packers stock.

Any and all help would be much appreciated. Please not haters.
Volquartsen bolt release and target hammer kit(Also Stainless or Alloy?), recoil buffer, and Target Rifle Trigger with trigger over travel screw

Did all that.. and between the stainless steel version.. and the blue version... Not much diffrence... if you want target change the barrel and stock as well.. doesnt have to be a bull barrel but I found (I have a stainless steel carbine) I changed the synthect stock (wood fits allot better) I changed it to 1 ramline stock.. added a sling to it.. changed the trigger parts out bolt realse alll you mentions but the trigger and the over travel screw.. (didnt bother)

I did a kit was hammer, sear, springs, target disconect, bolt buffer, stock, scope and sling (I took the scope off to get the weight down) add a few 25 round buttler creek mags (steel lips(Metal), hotlips (plastic))

Basicly gun.. 300 bucks... 5 mags.. 30 each (were I live) upgrades 300
Total..
750...
Yep could of bought a diffrent gun that was better for cheaper.. and not had to change anything...

Also dont forget the bushings because the new rugers have a 1 peice hammer kit.. so you might need the bushings as well... (pain to find sometimes)



Now... a hand gun might be a better choice... easy to hide.. For up close a .22 rifle and a .22 pistal shoot about the same..

Ok.. range wise for the 10/22 this is what I shoot

20 yards.. easy can iron sites
50 yards... still easy pop can iron sites
100 yards.. 1 or 2 shots pop can iron sites..
200 yards.. allot harder 2-4 shots pop can iron sites..
300 yards.. All luck...

Now a .22lr can go up to 2 1/2 miles.. and Ive seen my grandmother shoot iron sites out to 260 yards on a moveing squiral.. and I just stand there and go.... how... did she... Ive also see a mountain lion get shot with a .22lr in the head and drop on the spot.. (non hollow points just round lead bullets)

Now a henry h001 lever action...
I find its cheap finish (crap)
Can order a metal barrel band and metal front site...
Shoots 250 yards easy.. (longer barrel not much just a bit)

I also find that my old .22 that I shoot out to longer ranges tend to have longer barrels then most .22 rifles that are made today.. its about 1 inch to half and inch diffrence and they tend to shoot way better...

Windchester model 63
Shoots 250 yards well off iron sites (its pre 1945 so its old)

Sears Bolt action (cheapo .22lr)
Shoots 250 yards well off a scope (front site bent from factory shoots to the left)

Cooey N4r Bolt action .22s .22L .22LR
Shoots very well... (grandmothers gun that shot the mountain lion, squirals, magpies, skunks, ect)


I would look for the older guns personally they might be wood and a bit heavyer but really I find if it was older they had to work well so the quality was allot higher..
 

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before this is redirected.

(and from another 10/22 lover)

I replaced my takedown screw, recoil buffer, extractor, with Volquartsen parts. And added a Wolff reduced trigger springs kit. Wasnt a lot of money, maybe $50 total. Made an already great gun super awesome. I would get stainless, because the newer krinkle-paint "blued" barrels leave me with a sour taste in my mouth. Mine is a actual blued from 2006. And unlike new ones, mine also has the aluminum trigger assembly, instead of plastic.

Be aware that the stainless 10/22 has a painted-on finish receiver -- its not stainless per se. Only the barrel is stainless.
That and it chips were the rounds eject but underneath isnt steel its aircraft grade aluimiun so rust shouldnt be much of a problem (unless they mixed it with copper)

Blue version doesnt have this problem..
 

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superdizi
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10/22 is great. i have an older 2007 model i think with the metal parts. all stock, probably had about 3500-4000 rounds through it so far.

what i think would be cool though is, get one of the ugly lil 10/22 pistols and take the stock off and put some kinda custom folding stock on that thing. way smaller and apparently pretty accurate.

they make a 10/22 compact model too, its a few inches shorter.

i would try to find an older one that's been cared for and upgrade the internals. they are not bad as is though. everything on mine is stock and ive never even taken the trigger group out and cleaned it. i just clean the bore and chamber real well, and the receiver where i can get to it with the bolt still in, and the exterior and thats it. no problems except for the occasional brass that does impossible physics and jams backwards in the ejection port. thats only happened about 20 times though and i think has more to do with the ammo.
 

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Thinking outside the box
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I bought my 10/22 back in the mid eightys, put a 3 to 9 power scope on it and jungle clipped several 30 round clips together. It has been a good shooter for me all these years, the only problem has been certain ammo jamming. I've had the best luck with Federal high velocity ammo, it needs that extra "kick" to get the bolt back far enough and eject the spent one.
 

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We have 3 in our family. I've put an archangel kit on my wife's (it was supposed to be mine but she stole it), my son keeps his iron sited and mine is scoped but otherwise unremarkable. I like the KISS principle when it comes to guns. The best part of the 10/22 is the ability to make yours exactly as you want it. If I were you, I'd buy the camo version to begin with and go have fun.
 

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Father of 11 husband of 1
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I have broken a firing pin on a 10/22 so if you are ordering parts have them throw a couple of those in. I sold mine after I picked up my Savage .17HMR with accu-trigger. We still have a tricked out 10/22 (bull barrel, thumbhole stock, trigger kit) and it is a great shooter but, as someone pointed out, by the time my son was done it cost more than his .308 Howa did.
There is a certain amount of satisfaction that comes with building it however.
 

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The Buffer is nice but is not an absolute requirement.
A trigger job (Volquartsen parts) is nice again, but not absolutely needed, the factory parts can be modded to work easily enough.

You're going to have to shoot a whole bunch to heat the barrel up enough to really notice it. The factory barrels have improved over the years, some of the 'farmed out' parts years ago weren't up to snuff but even that was fairly easily corrected.

If you find it's not accurate enough, fire-lap it after doing a trigger job. Between the two, I've generally shrunk group size by an average of 50%.

In 25 years of working on .22's, I've only seen one 10/22 with a broken firing pin. I've seen one broken locking block on a heavily modded one that had gone through several different barrels (testing not worn out).

I'd put back a couple each of hammer springs, a couple of aftermarket extractors, a recoil spring/charging handle assembly and maybe a firing pin.

And pick up a whole mess of factory magazines. Unless you want to spend $65 a piece (Tactical Innovations), they're still the best available.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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If you're going to stick with the factory barrel, I wouldn't put a bunch of money into aftermarket trigger parts. They're not going to buy you much of an increase in accuracy. You might be better off doing a simple trigger job yourself, just to improve the pull a bit.

If you want a real tackdriver that's lightweight, you might look into installing Tactical Solutions aluminum barrel. It's far more stable than those lightweight composite barrels and gives accuracy about as close to competition grade as you can get with a 10/22. With that type of accuracy on tap, a good trigger group is very helpful.
 

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Excluding a full blown trued and blued action job nothing, repeat, nothing improves accuracy like a new or modified existing trigger...It will improve your scores, shrink your groups and make shooting easier.

Place the finest hand lapped chamber air gauged rifle barrel on a stock Mosin-Nagant and you'll do diddly squat to your shooting because you're still fighting a POS trigger with a what, 10+ lb let off and enough creep to drink a cup of coffee before it engages <<exageration!>>.

Mount a good trigger with zero creep and a 2.5 to 3 lb let off for field work and you'll do much better...BR rifles have triggers adjusted to as low as 2 ounces/50 grams...Now, once you have done the trigger a better barrel will again improve scores by helping to keeping things consistent.
 

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I have a lot of friends who bought the 10/22 and regret it they had to put a lot of money into it to make it right.So I bought a Marlin model 795 and right out of the box it is excellent I personally would not spend over 200.00 on a 10/22 and have to put money into it when the Marlin is 130.00 and shots great right out of the box.The triggers are adjustable
 

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Experiment 626
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Just buy a stainless with synthetic stock and it will fit your needs just fine. All the bells and whistles and fancy stocks just eat up your money for no reason because it is already a perfect .22 rifle.
Before you buy any of the fancy stocks.. make sure you take a good look at what it does to the sights. The "Arch-Angel" in particular raises your sight picture WAY above the barrel. That much hold-over in a .22 is insane. The rifle is perfect the way it is.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Excluding a full blown trued and blued action job nothing, repeat, nothing improves accuracy like a new or modified existing trigger...It will improve your scores, shrink your groups and make shooting easier.
I guess it depends on the shooter. I don't get much reduction in groups with trigger work in most factory guns. It does make them easier to shoot well with though. Now a highly tuned gun, yeah it's mandatory, and I'm one who prefers my triggers in the ounces range. The .22 pistol I hunt with has an 8 ounce trigger on it. I'm just used to it.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I have a lot of friends who bought the 10/22 and regret it they had to put a lot of money into it to make it right.So I bought a Marlin model 795 and right out of the box it is excellent I personally would not spend over 200.00 on a 10/22 and have to put money into it when the Marlin is 130.00 and shots great right out of the box.The triggers are adjustable
It's funny that you mention that. I bought a Savage heavy barrel .22 bolt gun on a whim. I think I paid about $220 for it. I slapped on a leftover BSA 6x18 scope that was gathering dust on a shelf and promptly proceeded to outshoot my $1,200 customized 10/22! My $500 Suhl 150 will outshoot the Savage by an even larger margin. So there are some serious tackdrivers out of the box available. The 10/22 isn't one of them. It takes work to reach it's potential. Heck, a Marlin model 60 will outshoot one too.

The bolt guns that are on the market can be amazingly accurate out of the box. Semi auto on a .22 isn't that important anyway. You rarely get a second quick followup shot at small game anyway.
 

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My vote is to get the regular model, not the heavy target barrel. A good trigger helps things out greatly. Be careful with folding stocks, some don't give you a good cheek weld. The way the gun stock meshes with your cheek. Without a good cheek weld, the gun is harder to shoot accurately.

I suggest you take a look at marlins offering in 22lr. I have several 22lr rifles. I really only shoot my marlin bolt action rifles. They have aftermarket triggers on them. they are tack drivers that aren't ammo picky. I use CCI standard velocity 40gr solid. Very quiet loads, almost subsonic with very little to no muzzleblast noise. I could shoot it all day w/o ear protection easily, but don't.

dont skimp out on a cheap scope and rings. Even more so the rings. If you can't afford a good scope setup, then buy better sights. Tech sights makes a great peep sight for the 10/22. A good peep sight can easily shrink the groups in half, especially on sunny days when the glare tend to make the groups move.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all the hlep. Im going to sell the barrel and get an alloy 18.5" barrel, Hogue over molded stock with sling swivels, and Tech sights.
 

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Geronimo!
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Yet more proof that the 10/22 is a good receiver but a poor rifle straight from the factory.

Everyone replaces everything, except the bolt group and receiver.

Think about it. What other mechanical device in the history of the world managed to pull off such a scam on the American public? And, don't get me wrong, I own two of the damn things. But what other mechanical device in the history of the world has garnered such a great reputation ... yet requires so much fixing and altering in order to make it right?

It just baffles me sometimes.
 

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In the strictly civilian marketplace the William B. Ruger Model 10/22 has the most aftermarket parts available for itself then any other firearm made.

In the military marketplace the Eugene M. Stoner AR rifle platform reigns supreme.

In the combined marketplaces the AR wins for manufactures and number of different devices available to it.

Gallo, like the Remington 700 action the only thing left of the 10/22 is the receiver shell, outer casing, skin or whatever you want to call it (the bolt carrier/group is replaced as well)...It amazes me to think spending all that time and money on a name to get something that has to be modified so much for it to perform well.

In the case of the Remington 700 you can buy a complete action from dozens of makers with an excellent trigger installed for a little more then to square, true and blueprint an existing action after replacing the trigger and bolt group…With the Ruger 10/22 why not just buy a complete rife from Magnum Research, Volquartsen etc. for the same amount as “futzing” around with the original and get something with an actual warranty on the whole rifle which you won’t have with your typical “bubba” job of gunsmithing!
 
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