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The Celtic Prepper
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This is fine for a start, but what about some high-quality protein (meats), olive oil, and nuts? How about adding some quinoa?

I don't know what the infatuation with white rice is. I understand it's cheap and stores long; even I have some basmatti rice stored, but it's not a great option. I kind of see it as the last resort.

Quinoa is protein dense, lots of vitamins, and a good source of total nutrients.
 

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Super Gassy Moderator
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This is fine for a start, but what about some high-quality protein (meats), olive oil, and nuts? How about adding some quinoa?

I don't know what the infatuation with white rice is. I understand it's cheap and stores long; even I have some basmatti rice stored, but it's not a great option. I kind of see it as the last resort.

Quinoa is protein dense, lots of vitamins, and a good source of total nutrients.
White rice doesn't seem to be hurting the Asian nations any. They eat a healthier diet than typical Americans, even though they have a lot of white carbs in it.

But I store a lot more of other grains. Wheat is my number one. Followed by barley. People buy rice because it's easy to find locally and cheap.
 

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The Celtic Prepper
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White rice doesn't seem to be hurting the Asian nations any. They eat a healthier diet than typical Americans, even though they have a lot of white carbs in it.

But I store a lot more of other grains. Wheat is my number one. Followed by barley. People buy rice because it's easy to find locally and cheap.
I understand the ease of storing and cost, but why choose white rice or jasmine when there are healthier options available? Even white basmatti rice has a much lower glycemic index and won't cause the major spike in blood sugar.

Most store-bought grains, in general, are filler foods. Our culture tends to eat the most of these when they should be eating them the least.

IMO, being healthy and taking care of your well being is an imperative part of survivalism. Your stored foods should reflect that somewhat. Not saying any of this is BAD to have (I have all of it in my preps too), it's just not ideal to live off of it.
 

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I just might be crazy
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But I store a lot more of other grains. Wheat is my number one. Followed by barley.
Why barley, Mike? I was in Honeyville this past weekend and saw bags of it and wondered why I might want that ... can you elaborate? Thanks
 

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Why barley, Mike? I was in Honeyville this past weekend and saw bags of it and wondered why I might want that ... can you elaborate? Thanks
Mostly because I like it. :D:

It's a healthy, easy to cook and versatile grain. I've always been particular to it. So it just made sense for me to store it.
 

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I understand the ease of storing and cost, but why choose white rice or jasmine when there are healthier options available? Even white basmatti rice has a much lower glycemic index and won't cause the major spike in blood sugar.

Most store-bought grains, in general, are filler foods. Our culture tends to eat the most of these when they should be eating them the least.

IMO, being healthy and taking care of your well being is an imperative part of survivalism. Your stored foods should reflect that somewhat. Not saying any of this is BAD to have (I have all of it in my preps too), it's just not ideal to live off of it.
Where I live, jasmine rice (forget basmati) costs double what white rice does. That's a pretty big incentive right there for me and probably others to to stick with white rice. Do I want 3 months worth of jasmine rice or 6 months of white rice? Not a tough question to answer.

MikeK is right. Literally billions of people today would say that they are (and would be) perfectly happy to get sufficient calories from 'filler' (i.e. cheap) food.

That being said, I would hope that no one here is getting most of their calories from eating simple carbohydrates like white rice on an everyday basis. However, in an emergency situation, you don't need nutrition; you need calories. You can live just fine for a long time getting 80%+ of your calories from plain old white rice. Ask an Asian.

A lot of people here like wheat, and there's no doubt that wheat berries of almost any kind are good food. My issue with wheat is that you need to store it in berry form to get the maximum shelf life. However, it takes a lot of energy, whether elbow grease or otherwise, to convert those berries into something edible. White rice, on the other hand, can be eaten without even cooking if you soak it in water for a couple of days.
 

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The following is not a criticism. It is a series of observations.
The following assumptions are implicitly in the excellent breakdown of costs, calories, and quantities:
1. There is no wastage;
2. There is a reasonable supply of fuel for cooking;
3. There is a reasonable supply of clean water for food preparation and clean up;
4. There is no concern about cooking odors attracting unwanted attention;
5. The consumer will be fully healthy and able to prepare his or her food;
6. There will be no guests.
7. The consumer values his or her time at zero and expects to have the time to devote to cooking.

If those assumptions fail (particularly the challenges of people smelling your food, being completely healthy, having clean water and having fuel), then the choices and calculations need some refinement.

In the “real world”, the reader of this thread is not living on 2000 calories a day. Come on! You are going to go through a serious weight loss at that level – probably a weight loss that is needed though.

If you realistically do not contemplate “bugging out”, “living off the land”, “farming without distractions” or look in the mirror and understand that you are not physically fit like an old time hunter gatherer or have medical problems, then you need to consider at least a partial modification.

All around you will be people who do not have water, have not put aside food, or have serious medical problems requiring daily treatment. There will be old people and babies and pre-schoolers relying on others for survival. They will want what you have and take it from you if your resources are brought to their attention.


f you can take a low profile for as long as 30 days, you will avoid the initial and very large die off of humans after shtf and when there is no governmental relief within a few days. So think about surviving (injured or not) without cooking, without gathering fuel, not having clean up or wastage, and using a minimal amount of water each day.

A can each of tuna fish/sardines/spam/stew, vegetables, and fruit (like fruit cocktail) will provide the protein, vitamins and nutrients, but not the calories. That works out to 90 cans per person. You have to get past the first 30 days after shtf to have any shot at going on for a year.
 

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I have not read ALL the posts, so it is likely the issues have been addressed already.
But here it goes: 1. It is impossible to survive for a year based on OPs list. With the things listed a (previously) healthy adult would get sick after a couple of months, the exact time depends on his current diet and how healthy he is now.
2. There is no fats listed, this is a quick death. Amount of protein is not remotely sufficient.
3. I don't see any vitamins
4. I don't see any stimulants. Many people are opposed to them, but having them (even for emergencies only) is absolutely essential. I am talking about caffeine (in any form), at least.
5. As was mentioned before, 2000 calories is grossly insufficient under almost any conditions, especially in cold weather.
 

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On a little side note. You may want to bump up the amount of salt your storing. Would be useful to prep meat you may obtain post shtf. It would also be a great bartering tool. Looking good!
 

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I understand the ease of storing and cost, but why choose white rice or jasmine when there are healthier options available? Even white basmatti rice has a much lower glycemic index and won't cause the major spike in blood sugar.

Most store-bought grains, in general, are filler foods. Our culture tends to eat the most of these when they should be eating them the least.

IMO, being healthy and taking care of your well being is an imperative part of survivalism. Your stored foods should reflect that somewhat. Not saying any of this is BAD to have (I have all of it in my preps too), it's just not ideal to live off of it.
Because Basmati doesn't store nearly as well for one thing.
 
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