Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
506 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So me and the fam don’t go on long hikes during the hot summer, 5 miles and under.

I’ve been using an old army issue backpack for years that a buddy gave me, its showing it’s age nowadays.

Is there any real difference in fit and comfort between it and the hiking packs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
I have a 5.11 Rush 72 that is good. It's a little pricey. They also make a Rush 24 that's smaller. I've been pretty hard on it and it shows minimal wear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Almost laughed when I read the OP.
You bet there is a difference.
What kind of budget do you have and what do you really want to do with the pack. Also, how well are you going to treat the pack, tactical bomb proof or just hiker backpack proof? It will mean the difference in at least 1-4 pounds of extra pack weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
For what it's worth Kelty has one of their older military grade backpacks on clearance. Only the black one is available. I picked one up a few months ago and I find it plenty big for day hikes without being overly large and heavy. It's a simple design that doesn't scream tactical if that matters to you. But for the new lower price ($37) I found it hard to resist. Link to purchase and a link to a review.

https://www.kelty.com/peregrine-1800/

https://youtu.be/8NCO0gq9VeE



Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,197 Posts
Im going to give the recommendation I always give.

https://specops.us/pack-tactical-bk.html

I have had mine for over 15 years, never a problem. If you do have a problem the company will fix it for cheap or free, depending on your story.
 
  • Like
Reactions: tcpip95

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,178 Posts
Another vote for Kelty packs.

Yes, there really is a difference in comfort and weight distribution with an ergonomic commercial Kelty hip belt and shoulder straps (other brands as well). At least compared to the ALICE external frame military rucks. If you're already using one of the modern USMC packs that are re-badged Arcteryx Bora models, the ride of a Kelty is going to be about the same... but less heavy.

If you need some room for emergency overnight gear or to carry extra stuff for smaller family members... the Kelty Coyote series is plenty of larger pack volume.

If less room is needed for just day hike activities... the smaller classic Redwing series.

Each available in a variety of sizes. To give you a sense of cargo volume comparison vs. surplus military rucks:

1. ALICE Large ruck is 62 liters / 3784 cubic inches (including outer pockets)
2. ALICE Medium ruck is 43 liters / 2635 cubic inches (including outer pockets)
3. Army MOLLE ruck is 82 liters / 5,000 cubic inches
4. USMC ILBE ruck is 75 liters / 4577 cubic inches

The Kelty Redwing models range in size from 30-50 liters.

The larger Coyote models range from 60 to 85 to 105 liters.

I have a Coyote 85; good for a hike requiring a week to ten days worth of consumables. The 105 liter version would be for multi-day winter expeditions where you need extra volume for cold weather sleeping bag, down parkas, tent, etc. Obviously, a 60-85 liter pack will work just fine on shorter hikes as well.

The Redwings are a classic medium sized design for a 1-3 day excursion. Airline carry-on sized if that's important. Perfect for day hikes, an overnighter, or just a trip to an outdoor recreational event. Not big enough to carry a lot of stuff for others (like kids), but big enough for the basics/emergency items on a day hike.

For day hiking w/ family, I'd probably grab one of the Redwing 50s and call it good. When Kelty offers a previous year's model (at a lower price)... snap it up.

https://www.kelty.com/Internal-Frame/

I own a lot of packs of different sizes. ALICE Large for my BOB. Gregory 105 liter (and a 95) Whitney for winter ski/snow machine tours. Gregory teardrop & Lowe Alpine models for climbing. Various other assault sized packs (Camelback Motherlode, SOG, Grey Ghost, etc.) for everything from patrolling to hunting to airline travel.

But for just straight up multi-day recreational hiking... my Kelty Coyote is a pleasure to wear and as good as any other brand. Without scorching my wallet. Kelty has made hiking packs for a long, long time. They've worked out most of the bugs and their layouts/design features reflect a lot of common sense experience.

Keep your eyes peeled for sports shop sales, on-line sales, e-bay, or craigslist. You can often find such packs (unused or barely used) for a song...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,926 Posts
My 72 hour pack is just a Camelbak Mule and should be more than enough for a day hiking bag.

I carry food, shelter, hammock, bivy bag, eating utensils, water purification system (I carry water in a canteen on my belt) and a bunch more in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,178 Posts
bill tyler:

If family members are carrying their own packs, go with a smaller pack for yourself.

If you need to carry stuff for little ones or those who can't manage much weight... get something big enough for that job (including carry of party emergency gear).
 

·
reluctant sinner
Joined
·
16,674 Posts
There can be a lot of difference in comfort/fit between packs. A few hours on your back a couple of time a year, you can apparently tough it out.

I usually always have a day pack with stuff since I was kid. If I'm going far or with a heavy load then I putting on my Kelty D4 external frame with a wide hip belt. In 1974 I added holes to move the top of the shoulder out about 1", moved the lower back band up about 2.5 inches and installed aluminium turnbuckles so I could tighten the lacing on the back bands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Spend once on a good pack.

If you ever need to carry 75-100 lbs you need a good pack.

The big difference between a cheap pack and a great pack is when you overload it. A cheap pack will punish you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I'm another Kelty fan. When I needed a new hiking pack I tried on several brands at REI where they will load you up with sandbags to the weight you request so you can feel how comfortable the pack is while you're walking around. It's amazing how comfortable my Kelty Redwing is.
 

·
In the woods
Joined
·
548 Posts
You bet your rear end there is a difference. The backpacks they are making for the hiking market are far superior to anything you can find at the Army/Navy stores.

I'll second Fire Fighter. Osprey has a nice quality line of proven equipment. My Kestral 48 is 9 years old, has hundreds of miles under it's belt and is in showroom condition aside from a little dirt.


The make a 22L day pack that I really like;

https://www.rei.com/rei-garage/product/182903/deuter-airlite-22-pack-mens

Also, since it's wicked hot where you live I need to mention Deuter packs. They have perhaps the most comfortable suspension systems on the market. Superior air flow as well. The Airlite 22 is on sale at REI right now;

https://www.rei.com/rei-garage/product/182903/deuter-airlite-22-pack-mens

1st things first, you should measure your torso length in order to achive the best fit for a pack.
 

·
Only politics *****.
Joined
·
5,394 Posts
Only advice i can give about packs: Try them out! Try them with some more weight and bulk than you'll be using it. Any discomfort you feel in the store (or while testing in general), will on the trail translate to hours of that discomfort, and will be felt by your body and mind (Like a little pebble in your shoe. It's not doing anything, it's just there, but it annoys the hell out of most people including me). A little rough patch on the hip belt due to sowing can for example rub through your tshirt (making a hole in it) and rub against your skin giving you abrasion marks. Even the exact same pack you have and love, can become a nightmare due to that. Something adjusted wrong can lead to your back getting sore when trying to balance the pack. This becomes even more important, the more and heavier you pack.

Also, multiple packs aren't bad. You don't need your pack to carry 70 pounds if you're going to use it for overnighters usually. I have a 20L Osprey Daylite plus, a 36L Osprey Stratos, a 45L KarrimorSF Sabre45 (with side pouches which make it 70L). All get used depending on the circumstances and the needs of the trip. Mostly i use the lightest one i can get away with though ;).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
506 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I’ll look into these, I did a little 5 mile trail this morning and the old pack wasn’t too pleasant. It’s just awkward fitting.

Not to mention I’m guilty of packing too much crap every time.
 

·
Only politics *****.
Joined
·
5,394 Posts
I’ll look into these, I did a little 5 mile trail this morning and the old pack wasn’t too pleasant. It’s just awkward fitting.

Not to mention I’m guilty of packing too much crap every time.
Just don't limit yourself to certain brands and don't rush it. Trying everything you can, can lead to you finding the perfect pack for you, which you wouldn't have considered otherwise. As long as they have a good reputation qualitywise of course. ;)

A good way to stop overpacking: buy a pack which fits what you need, and not much more. I'm also of the mind: "but what if i need x,y,z?", while ultimately i never do, and if i would "need" it, i still wouldn't be in trouble. Of course this will vary from trip to trip and locationwise, which is why multiple packs aren't that bad. It makes you consider what you actually need or what's a comfort item (some comfort items are definitely worth it though, again depending from person to person). Can really trim a pack down that way. Just need to force yourself to pack for the realistically worst expected conditions. Not the worst case outcome of being on a camping trip and WW3 breaking out :D:.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Couple buddies and I regularly pack 40-50lbs anywhere from 10-20 miles. We all run Osprey packs.

Best advice in this thread though, is try them on. Find what works for YOU from a reputable and trusted manufacturer.


If you are at all crafty. Look at the diy options too. Can save you some scratch. Myog is really popular among the outdoor crowd and you don't have to reinvent the wheel.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top