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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Looking for the “best” high smoke point oil for deep frying and or high temp frying.
I don’t mind paying a bit extra, but want the biggest “bang for the buck”. I put extra value on items that are organic, minimally processed, non-GMO and “healthy”

My preference is lard or tallow rendered from the critters I’ve raised, but unfortunately the pantry is bare and it’s still too darn hot for slaughtering / hanging / butchering.

The options I’m looking at are below. The first three are from a trusted retailer of quality products. The last (peanut oil) is from a typical grocery store.


Sunflower $25.80/ gallon
Organic
Non-GMO
Expeller pressed
Smoke Point 475 degrees

Canola oil $19.00/ gallon
Organic
Non-GMO
Expeller pressed
Smoke Point 470 degrees

Safflower $17.36 / gallon
Pesticide free
Non-GMO
Expeller pressed
Smoke Point 480 degrees

“Regular” Peanut oil $15.25 / gallon
LouAna brand
INGREDIENTS - (24 oz., 64 oz., 128 oz. sizes): Peanut Oil. (3-gallon size): Peanut Oil, TBHQ and Citric Acid added to protect flavor, Dimethylpolysiloxane (anti-foaming agent).
Smoke point 450 degrees

Edit to add smoke points, in bold
 

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Tallow is good for deep frying. So is ghee. Lard has too low a smoke point. (You want a smoke point over 400ºF for deep frying as you want to stay at least 25 degrees below smoke point, and 50 below is safer if you want to use it twice and/or store it for close to its maximum shelf life).

Most vegetable oils only have a high enough smoke point if refined, which sounds like not what you are looking for. Sadly, saturated-fat tallow and ghee were much healthier choices for deep frying than the currently favored hexane-extracted and chemically degummed, bleached, and deodorized highly refined vegetable oils.

You can see some of the marked differences between unrefined and refined oils here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Smoke_point_of_cooking_oils
and here:
Cooking Oil Smoke Points

Expeller-pressed naturally refined (filtered) avocado oil is a possibility, as is camelina oil*, macadamia oil if you don't fry at a higher temp than 375 (smoke point 410ºF), grapeseed oil, and some very low-acid extra virgin olive oils. The number of cold-pressed unrefined vegetable oils that can handle deep-frying temp of 375 is limited, and those that can handle one up to 400 even more limited although a couple can if just naturally refined with cold filtration.

Keep in mind that smoke point drops after each use if you attempt to reuse your frying oil and also drops slowly over time.

How to Choose the Best Cooking Oil

If in doubt about how refined an oil is or isn't and what its smoke point is, most manufacturers of natural oils will tell you what it is for their product.

*There is currently at least one Canadian and one American producer of cold-pressed unrefined camelina oil available online. Camelina was a much-used cooking oil in Europe until supplanted by higher-production and therefore cheaper sunflower and rapeseed. It's a rather unique polyunsaturated oil in terms of omega 3/6 essential fatty acid profile, shelf life, and smoke point. Assuming this year's crop survived those locusts in Montana, worth investigating. Unfortunately, only smaller quantities are available in gas-flushed amber glass. Larger volumes come in clear plastic jugs rather than olive-oil-style tins (sigh).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
For what little deep drying I do, I use peanut oil with great success.
I’ve fried with peanut oil as well and it does a great job.
However, the typical peanut oil at the grocery store is highly processed. In fact its so highly processed that peanut oil is not considered an allergen for people with a peanut allergy. I prefer to avoid highly processed foods.

From the Peanut Institute:

“Research shows that highly refined peanut oil, which has had all of the allergic peanut proteinsremoved, does not cause an allergic response in severely allergic individuals. A controlled human study published in the British Medical Journal tested refined peanut oil in 60 severely allergic individuals and found that “refined peanut oil did not pose a risk in any of the subjects” who were allergic to peanuts.”
The FDA Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act also state, “highly refined oils and ingredients derived from highly refined oils are excluded from the definition of ‘major food allergen.’”
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Tallow is good for deep frying. So is ghee. Lard has too low a smoke point. (You want a smoke point over 400ºF for deep frying as you want to stay at least 25 degrees below smoke point, and 50 below is safer if you want to use it twice and/or store it for close to its maximum shelf life).

Most vegetable oils only have a high enough smoke point if refined, which sounds like not what you are looking for.
You can see some of the marked differences between unrefined and refined oils here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Smoke_point_of_cooking_oils
and here:
Cooking Oil Smoke Points

Expeller-pressed naturally refined (filtered) avocado oil is a possibility, as is camelina oil, macadamia oil if you don't fry at a higher temp than 375 (smoke point 410ºF), grapeseed oil, and some very low-acid extra virgin olive oils. Sadly, tallow and ghee were much healthier choices for deep frying than the currently favored hexane-extracted and chemically degummed, bleached, and deodorized highly refined vegetable oils.

Keep in mind that smoke point drops after each use if you attempt to reuse your frying oil and also drops slowly over time.

How to Choose the Best Cooking Oil

If in doubt about how refined an oil is or isn't and what its smoke point is, most manufacturers of natural oils will tell you what it is for their product.
I edited my OP to include the smoke point as listed by the seller.……

Thx for the links!
 

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I edited my OP to include the smoke point as listed by the seller.……
Which would indicate all of those are refined oils, plus with added chemical crap in the case of the peanut oil.

Natural antioxidants such as ascorbyl palmitate (oil-miscible vitamin C), mixed tocopherols (vitamin E), and rosemary extract have been shown to do as good or better a job of delaying rancidity as toxic BHA/BHT/TBHQ. The biggest consideration for storage life, though, is packaging in an inert-gas-flushed tin or amber glass bottle rather than clear glass or, even worse, clear plastic.

Even if you are not concerned with long-term storage, slowly developing rancidity will drop your smoke point and impact the oil's use for deep frying. Alas, the many sources of information on oil shelf life generally do not specify and totally disregard how the oil is packaged just as the information on smoke point often does not specify and totally disregards how the oil was extracted and/or refined. Makes the whole question of "best" oils/fats for storage or frying a real PITA to research. :p

The only thing that's a given is that you will pay more for healthier cold or low-temp pressed oils that are not chemically refined/stablilized with toxic antioxidants and that are packaged to store well. And you will generally have to search for such these days somewhere besides the average supermarket shelf.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Unfortunately it looks like to have an unrefined expeller press vegetable oil with a high smoke point, I better be ready to dig deep and spend some $$$.

Guess I better fatten up those sheep and sharpen the knifes and make some tallow.

In mean time, I’ll just enjoy my fried chicken and french fries using refined oil. 🍗😀🍗🍟🤤…….everything in moderation!!!
 

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We have been using the LouAna peanut oil blend with good results and we get it free. If a container goes out of date at the hardware store where my wife works they write it off and she brings it home. Never had any hint of rancidity and I am very sensitive to it. I use avocado oil for shallow frying as it is quite pricey.
 

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I'm no expert,just personal experience/opinon.
Deep frying is total imersion of the product,of same size.
Depending on the size,the key is timing.Too hot,burns outside,or raw inside.
Too cool,or over filled,soggy if breaded or batter.
30 years of cooking,365 is the average for deep fat fryers,gas or electric.Smoking occours from sediment burning,or old oil.Frequnt filtering/skimming is a must,adding fresh oil at times,but it only lasts so long.They can be on up to 18 hours a day.

Stove top/pan frying is a different animal..high heat,but just a little oil.Adds flavor,color,prevents sticking..temps can vary.

Maybe not much help as the "best",but 2 different things.

I've deep fried hundreds of turkeys every thanksgiving for 20 years..from 12 to 25 pounds..same holds true..365F..used peanut oil.
 

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I use peanut oil, but I don't do much deep frying anymore, mostly wok cooking and basting.

As cook said, oil can last a while if it's kept clean. at the restaurant I worked at we had a screen and we'd spin the oil in the fryers with it and eventually all the sediment would end up in the dead center of the fryer and you could scoop it out. Just like cleaning a swimming pool. We'd filter the oil every few days and it probably got changed bi-weekly.

I used to do the same thing with the turkey fryer oil every year and could get several years out of it before i would just rack it off into smaller jugs for cooking.
 

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And now you know why all those studies say deep frying is unhealthy. It's not so much that things get immersed in oil as the oil they frequently get immersed in. ;)
With all the studies I have seen over the years say this is bad for you, no wait, it's good for you, and vice versa, I believe these studies about as much as I believe the medical and pharmaceutical industry's studies...
 
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