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Old 03-06-2008, 04:50 PM
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Talking Chicken Of The Woods



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The "Chicken of the Woods" is a popular edible, and easily recognized by its color, soft texture, and absence of gills. I'm not a big fan (it's a little "fungus-y" for me), but I know many people who love it. The young rosettes and the tender edges from mature clusters are more palatable than the older, tougher specimens. Though the Chicken of the Woods is a safe and easily recognized edible mushroom, it should not be eaten raw; there are reports of people being adversely affected when the mushroom was not cooked.

Recent mycological "splitting" has resulted in an array of species spanning North America, nearly all of which formerly "passed" as Laetiporus sulphureus. See the comments below for some of the details.

Description:

Ecology: Parasitic and saprobic; growing alone or, more typically, in large clusters on decaying logs and stumps of hardwoods and conifers; summer and fall, rarely in winter and spring; widely distributed as a species cluster, but the "true" Laetiporus sulphureus may be limited to areas east of the Rocky Mountains (see below). Laetiporus sulphurues causes a reddish brown cubical heart rot, with thin areas of white mycelium visible in the cracks of the wood. The mushrooms do not appear until well after the fungus has attacked the tree; by the time the chickens appear, they are definitely coming home to roost, as far as the tree's health is concerned.

Fruiting Body: 5-60 cm broad, up to 4 cm thick; fan-shaped to obtusely semicircular; smooth to gently wrinkled; suedelike; bright yellow to bright orange when young, frequently fading in maturity and with direct sunlight.

Pores: Tightly packed and nearly invisible when young; sulfur yellow; sometimes bruising darker.

Flesh: Thick; soft and watery when young, becoming tough, eventually crumbling away; white to pale yellow.









Laetiporus cincinnatus a similar species, found east of the Rockies, with a white pore surface. It grows from the roots of hardwoods (mainly oaks), at the butt of the trunk or terrestrially, away from the tree.


Laetiporus gilbertsonii grows in coastal western North America, from Oregon to Baja California, on oaks and Eucalyptus. The type collection for the species was made in Golden Gate Park, on Eucalyptus. It is morphologically indistinguishable from Laetiporus sulphureus, but the two species will not "mate" in culture, making them biologically distinct. It can be found growing on dead wood and on living trees.

Laetiporus conifericola, illustrated to the right, grows on living and dead conifer wood in western North America. Though morphologically indistinguishable, it is easily separated from other species of Laetiporus by its range and host wood. It has (very) slightly larger spores (6-8 x 4-5 ). It, too, is a biological species--but it will mate, about 15 percent of the time, with a conifer-loving chicken from the Great Lakes area, Laetiporus huroniensis (which is much more often than I would).

for nutritional facts go to....http://www.nutritiondata.com/

SOURCE:http://www.mushroomexpert.com/laetip...ulphureus.html
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Old 03-07-2008, 05:29 PM
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I found a huge chicken while geocaching last spring. I didn't know what it was. My wife and I forgot the camera that day. We thought is was cool, but never thought it was edible. I will have to go hunting round there this spring. Thanks for the great pics.
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Old 03-08-2008, 01:52 PM
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very high in protein and vit A,B
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Old 03-08-2008, 01:55 PM
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Top Post AAPEXX.
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Old 03-08-2008, 04:42 PM
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This is one of the good beginner mushrooms that pretty much anybody can learn to identify- see the pics... and go find it. The only thing that looks even remotely like it is not poisonous, and smells and tastes bad and grows on the ground- berkley's polypore aka dead man's fingers. This mushroom has a firm meaty texture very much like chicken breast... do not over cook it and be careful with it when you harvest.. if you bruise the edges they can become bitter when cooked. I picked one of these mushrooms off the side of a big old dead oak that weighed in at 112 lbs. and we couldn't get it all as it grew so far up the tree! We loaded the canoe full twice and took it back to the family reunion where it was kettle fried for all to enjoy-
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Old 03-09-2008, 07:40 AM
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this is an excellent post.we need more of these.keep up the good work AAPEXX.
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Old 03-09-2008, 08:32 AM
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is their eny other way to cook the mushroom other than frien it? like of you were in a survival situation without a frin pan.
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Old 03-09-2008, 12:40 PM
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is their eny other way to cook the mushroom other than frien it? like of you were in a survival situation without a frin pan.
On a wooden scewer above the fire like a kebab.
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Old 03-09-2008, 04:31 PM
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You can cook them any way you want... in a survival situation I would at least try to wrap it in something to keep it moist... a dab of oil and wrapped in tin foil over a fire isn't bad.. just don't over cook it! If all else fails on a stick over an open fire will work. Keep in mind that all wild mushrooms really should be cooked before eating though as mushrooms in general are rather hard to digest and can cause digestinal upset if eaten raw. Also- always test a small piece a wait a couple hours the first time you try a new species.. I know one person who is allergic to some wild mushrooms! Some people have allergies to chicken mushrooms just like other foods so be careful the first time!
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Old 03-18-2008, 10:12 PM
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Talking

check theses video's out
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Old 03-19-2008, 02:01 AM
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i like them smoked
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Old 03-19-2008, 02:50 AM
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Every survival book I've read said stay away from the mushroom. You really have to know what you're doing if you eat wild mushys. Some can kill you really fast, and there's nothing magic about eating a drug one, IT SUX. I wouldn't go eating them, too dangerous for my liking. Just shoot an animal, at least you know what you're getting.
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Old 03-27-2008, 05:51 AM
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Thank you for these posts. Informative. I will be will looking for this fungus on my next hike. K
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Old 03-27-2008, 02:23 PM
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95% of all mushrooms will make you sick or kill you, or said the other way, only 5% are edible, and not by all people. (Contrast that with all but two lichen are edible if prepared correctly.) If you have studied mushrooms with someone old (read successful) then go for it. Otherwise it's a large risk for the small payoff. I'm an expert at edible wild plants but I have not ventured into the mushroom world, plants are challenging enough. As I say in one of my videos I've never misidentified a plant, but I'm been made ill from other things such non-bacterial pollutants in the water near the plant -- and go figure, it was out in the middle of no where. That's how polluted we are becoming. My point is being sick from what you ate isn't fun. Been there, suffered that. It makes one careful. Long ago one of the fellow I studied with had a great answer when someone suggested he eat this or that: He would say: Let me watch you find it, collect it, prepare it and eat it. And if you're not dead or sick tomorrow I might try it.

Last edited by Zorba; 03-27-2008 at 02:28 PM.. Reason: typos
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Old 11-10-2012, 02:22 AM
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An excellent thread for sure!! (This whole base is awesome)
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Old 11-10-2012, 02:28 PM
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Exelent post. I have seen these in the woods before and never knew thew were edible.
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Old 11-10-2012, 07:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highp0wer View Post
Every survival book I've read said stay away from the mushroom. You really have to know what you're doing if you eat wild mushys. Some can kill you really fast, and there's nothing magic about eating a drug one, IT SUX. I wouldn't go eating them, too dangerous for my liking. Just shoot an animal, at least you know what you're getting.
Their are a few of mushrooms that are considered FoolProof ( puffballs, lions mane, and chicken of the woods ). I was at Barnes and noble once and saw Chicken of the woods on a pamphlet about wild edibles. they said that it was only included because it was so unmistakeable.

Saying that I'm with you I'm not eating a mushroom out in the woods unless I have an expert with me.

I have a book on mushrooms in my area, and I like learning about them. I would just feel more comfortable with an expert with me.

some mushrooms can only be identified via microscope.
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