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Old 12-08-2012, 08:37 PM
SirThrivalist SirThrivalist is offline
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I've been playing with my gear and it hit me recently:
I should train with my equipment (not just practice with it).

When I say train, I mean be active with my gear in different scenarios. For example,
I can hike with my ILBE, but can I climb with it or can I run with it at a quick pace and
evade if I had to? Do I know how to drop it immediately and come back for it if I had to?
Etcetera...

So, I'm going to put myself on a regiment of actual PT with and without my ILBE.
I''m going to run with it, scramble with it, climb with it and work with it and master
it like I master my tools and other gear. That way, if anything ever happened that I
had to didi from a 4 or 2 legged animal, I could do it knowing exactly how my body would
react to the weight, to the pack shifting, to what my personal capabilities were with the
pack on or if it being off me would be a better option in certain situations & circumstances.

I kind of got the inkling of an idea from doing squats with my pack loaded (with only 50lbs).
I thought to myself "what if I were chillaxin' by a fire with my pack on and I had to get up quick?
Could I do it?" At first, it was awkward to work with it, but like anything in life pretty much,
there is a method to everything and your body has to develop the muscles & movements
needed for certain actions that only come from developing them through use and practice.

Along with that, I'm also going to condition my body as well. Winter's going to be a great time
to do it too as I'll be able to burn calories at a much higher rate plus if I can do it in the cold first,
it'll be an easier transition to working out in the heat. Then again, I'm a creature of the outdoors when
it comes to working hard physically. I'm open to any suggestions or ideas you guys might have.
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:41 PM
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:43 PM
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:44 PM
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Winter, spring, summer or fall?

Welcome to Wyoming.
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:46 PM
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Winter, spring, summer or fall?

Welcome to Wyoming.
NICE!
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:54 PM
Damien4166 Damien4166 is offline
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That is a great idea and I think everyone with a BoB should be doing this regularly as well.
Sure we may be prepared with the things we need to get up and go but we also need to be able to manage the added weight and new center of balance wearing a pack. My only suggestion is to start with 1/4 the weight you are going to use when full and week after week add more weight. Going 100% from the start might cause some un needed injuries.
I like how you take this to the next level by mentioning that you will climb with it ect, again when doing these tasks make sure you start with lower weight. Also use the same foot wear you intend to wear, and get a 2nd pair to break in and alternate, that way you will not have blisters if one pair craps out on you (also if your feet get wet its nice to slip them into a dry pair)
You have officially re motivated me
My Dog thanks you :P
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Old 12-08-2012, 09:04 PM
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Something else I want to work with this upcoming winter will be a total immersion in my skills development.

Besides mastering my equipment (tools, packs, loads, etc...), it's time to master my survival skills
(trapping, firemaking, shelter construction, food prep/procurement, foraging, bushcrafting, etc...).
I mean REALLY working on my skillset.

I'm going to begin to study my environment a lot more (plant/rock/soil recognition, water sources,
wildlife, weather, etc...). I'm also going to revive my construction skills (welding, metal working,
tool making, masonry, etc...).

I already have a wealth of knowledge on survival needs that the common man doesn't, but I need
to bring it all together into some kind of order. AND I also need to learn a lot more (hunting, game
preparation, food storage, etc...).

My home is pretty dang well equipped for natural disasters, but I definitely need to organize things
here and teach my wife who is already a very capable person in her own respect how to work with
me on prepping for something AND on how to do things by herself when I'm not around.
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Old 12-08-2012, 09:08 PM
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Bushcraft101 Bushcraft101 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SirThrivalist View Post
Something else I want to work with this upcoming winter will be a total immersion in my skills development.

Besides mastering my equipment (tools, packs, loads, etc...), it's time to master my survival skills
(trapping, firemaking, shelter construction, food prep/procurement, foraging, bushcrafting, etc...).
I mean REALLY working on my skillset.

I'm going to begin to study my environment a lot more (plant/rock/soil recognition, water sources,
wildlife, weather, etc...). I'm also going to revive my construction skills (welding, metal working,
tool making, masonry, etc...).

I already have a wealth of knowledge on survival needs that the common man doesn't, but I need
to bring it altogether into some kind of order. AND I also need to learn a lot more (hunting, game
preparation, food storage, etc...).

My home is pretty dang well equipped for natural disasters, but I definitely need to organize things
here and teach my wife who is already a very capable person in her own respect how to work with
me on prepping for something AND on how to do things by herself when I'm not around.
Thats good. Now go do it. Take pics and notes. Report back when you relize your pack is to heavy. J/K
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Old 12-08-2012, 09:33 PM
SirThrivalist SirThrivalist is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Damien4166 View Post
That is a great idea and I think everyone with a BoB should be doing this regularly as well.
Sure we may be prepared with the things we need to get up and go but we also need to be able to manage the added weight and new center of balance wearing a pack. My only suggestion is to start with 1/4 the weight you are going to
use when full and week after week add more weight. Going 100% from the start might cause some un needed injuries.
I like how you take this to the next level by mentioning that you will climb with it ect, again when doing these tasks
make sure you start with lower weight. Also use the same foot wear you intend to wear, and get a 2nd pair to break
in and alternate, that way you will not have blisters if one pair craps out on you (also if your feet get wet its nice to
slip them into a dry pair)
You have officially re motivated me
My Dog thanks you :P
LOL! Thanks bro!

Actually, that's exactly how I planned to ease into it starting out with lighter loads and working my way up.
I've spent decades carrying 100lbs of material up 40' ladders in all kinds of weather extremes (0 degrees to
100 degrees with the work area averaging up to 130-140 degrees in the summer). As for footwear, I have at
least 5 pairs of broken in boots pretty much at all times. My goodness. Carrying a loaded pack in the woods
is a vacation compared to what I've done all my life. I'm not saying I'm some type of Billy-Badarse.
Let's just say I'm probably in better condition to do this than average for this sort of hump. I just gotta (like
I said before) wake-up & develop muscles to use with a pack specifically and adapt my body to these tasks.

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Old 12-09-2012, 12:45 AM
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Welcome to the club. I go out once a month and do a whole big field X just to stay current. That's how I got my gear tailored to exactly how I want it.
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Old 12-09-2012, 03:32 AM
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You are going to have a lot of fun Sir! Once you become really familiar with your new ILBE ruck you will live for the time you get to spend alone with it.
I pretty much live for my time up in the high country alone. Some here will post regularly about the futility of the "Lone Wolf" approach to survival but they probably do not spend anywhere near the time I do alone in very remote rugged landscapes.

Welcome to Wyoming.
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Old 12-09-2012, 03:37 AM
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I spend lots of time doing what I call "Pre Foraging". My garden is up in the mountains and it has proven worthwhile to activly cultivate all my favorite wild edibles. The bounty up here is beyond description.
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Old 12-09-2012, 03:43 AM
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Backpacking will allow you to hang out in places like this and catch enough fish to feed a squad! I know where and how to catch more of these brooktrout than I could ever eat by myself. I like fishing up here because I always have the place to myself.
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Old 12-09-2012, 05:53 AM
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Excellent outdoor porn, as always, from Biathalon!

Sirthrivalist, when you begin training with your gear, you begin entering an echelon of experience that most people will never enter.

Everyone always asks why I'm so hell bent on capping the EWLS at 30-35lbs, and the answer, of course, is that I've trained with my gear! I know my limits for the terrain and water availability around here! We got some steep ass hill up in this bitch!

I see all these people with 40-80lb INCH bags and BOB's, carrying two rifles and no water, and I think to myself "That dood has not once tried to bugout or go hiking with that bag." As biathalon and I were talking about, once you put in some dirt time, it becomes blatantly obvious who has and who hasn't put in dirt time.

Again, I have to reiterate that I'm not coming down on anyone. Everyone is on their own leg of their own journey, and I don't view dirt time as some form of elite online currency, LOL. But I DO view dirt time as a measure of how prepared a person is should an event ever provoke the use of their gear!

What am I babbling about? What's the whole point? Well, when I read this post, I felt kind of proud for you, dood! When you showed up here, you made a TON of posts, you weren't scared to ask questions, you took the new-guy hazing in stride, and now you've come to the CRITICAL realization that you need to train with your gear!

It's been fun watching your mind and skillset mature since you've come to the boards, dood. You journey has impressed me! I think you've done an incredible job! Well done, sir!
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Old 12-09-2012, 06:25 AM
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See a 40-80lb BOB wouldn't be as bad if you were in good shape in the plains. But your right with mountains terrain you need to know your limits. You can burn out those gluts, and quads pretty fast if your not use to it. But this is how we find out what we can and cannot do and what gear is and is not worth while.
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:14 AM
SirThrivalist SirThrivalist is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twyggy View Post
Sirthrivalist, when you begin training with your gear, you begin entering an echelon of experience that most people will never enter.

I see all these people with 40-80lb INCH bags and BOB's, carrying two rifles and no water, and I think to myself "That dood has not once tried to bugout or go hiking with that bag." As biathalon and I were talking about, once you put in some dirt time, it becomes blatantly obvious who has and who hasn't put in dirt time.

Again, I have to reiterate that I'm not coming down on anyone. Everyone is on their own leg of their own journey, and I don't view dirt time as some form of elite online currency, LOL. But I DO view dirt time as a measure of how prepared a person is should an event ever provoke the use of their gear!

What am I babbling about? What's the whole point? Well, when I read this post, I felt kind of proud for you, dood! When you showed up here, you made a TON of posts, you weren't scared to ask questions, you took the new-guy hazing in stride, and now you've come to the CRITICAL realization that you need to train with your gear!

It's been fun watching your mind and skillset mature since you've come to the boards, dood. You journey has impressed me! I think you've done an incredible job! Well done, sir!
Twigster,

You humble me.



And I agree wholeheartedly.

There comes a point where one has to stop clicking the mouse and stop reading books and apply what one's learned.
I've been doing it (working with my gear), but the problem is that once I begin, I don't want to stop and I haven't had
the time I've really wanted to put in (way too busy lately with other stuff). So now, as the active season winds down for
me, I'm looking forward to many cold days (and nights) out in the sticks just working on my skillset.

By the time the Spring rolls around, I hope to be rudimentarily proficient.

Thank you for your words of encouragement brother.


Quote:
Originally Posted by paramilusmc View Post
See a 40-80lb BOB wouldn't be as bad if you were in good shape in the plains. But your right with mountains terrain you need to know your limits. You can burn out those gluts, and quads pretty fast if your not use to it. But this is how we find out what we can and cannot do and what gear is and is not worth while.
Exactly. An emergency situation is not the time to find out what one "can't" do.
Now is the time to prep, to learn, to train, to become intimately acquainted with
your gear so if/when SHTF, you hit the ground running (not panting). By then,
you're mind/body/gear should act as one unit. I'm getting like that with my knife.
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Old 12-09-2012, 11:36 AM
SirThrivalist SirThrivalist is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biathlon View Post
You are going to have a lot of fun Sir! Once you become really familiar with your new ILBE ruck you will live for the time you get to spend alone with it.
I pretty much live for my time up in the high country alone. Some here will post regularly about the futility of the "Lone Wolf" approach to survival but they probably do not spend anywhere near the time I do alone in very remote rugged landscapes.

Welcome to Wyoming.
IMO, the "Lone Wolf" approach is going to be a right of passage for me.
I think it's the epitome of survival. That's when you need the greatest
skillset since you won't have anyone to share the workload with.

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Old 12-09-2012, 07:49 PM
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Take up Backpack bowhunting, and you'll soon whittle away all the unessessary crap you don't need to carry. I use Vietnam era webbing, pouches and bumbag, for kit that stays on me during the entire hunt, and use a swiss patrol pack for sleeping gear that is dumped at whatever campsite is chosen for the night.
I like the Swiss patrol pack, because it has no exterior pockets, doesn't catch on anything, and is small enough to only carry enough gear that is needed.

Just going hunting with your gear is enough 'practise' to see what is uselful and what is not. As Twyggy states, a lot of guys that collect gear, pack it, but never yse it, don't take into account WATER.
Try carrying your gear, plus 5-8 litres of water (per day) up these slopes (see below), in 35* celcius, and you soon realise what the real essentials for survival are.
Water comes before gear in summer. No water and you'll die pretty quick.
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Old 12-09-2012, 09:18 PM
SirThrivalist SirThrivalist is offline
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Originally Posted by Enigma_1 View Post
Take up Backpack bowhunting, and you'll soon whittle away all the unessessary crap you don't need to carry. I use Vietnam era webbing, pouches and bumbag, for kit that stays on me during the entire hunt, and use a swiss patrol pack for sleeping gear that is dumped at whatever campsite is chosen for the night.
I like the Swiss patrol pack, because it has no exterior pockets, doesn't catch on anything, and is small enough to only carry enough gear that is needed.

Just going hunting with your gear is enough 'practise' to see what is uselful and what is not. As Twyggy states, a lot of guys that collect gear, pack it, but never yse it, don't take into account WATER.
Try carrying your gear, plus 5-8 litres of water (per day) up these slopes (see below), in 35* celcius, and you soon realise what the real essentials for survival are.
Water comes before gear in summer. No water and you'll die pretty quick.
I'm going bowhunting soon with the in-laws actually.



As for water, I've learned it is all-important.
I already have 9lbs (4L) of H2O included in my
pack's weight. That, plus about 4lbs for food.
Cold? I was raised working actively in down
to 10 degree weather regularly for years.
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Old 12-09-2012, 09:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SirThrivalist View Post
I've been playing with my gear and it hit me recently:
I should train with my equipment (not just practice with it).

When I say train, I mean be active with my gear in different scenarios. For example,
I can hike with my ILBE, but can I climb with it or can I run with it at a quick pace and
evade if I had to? Do I know how to drop it immediately and come back for it if I had to?
Etcetera...

So, I'm going to put myself on a regiment of actual PT with and without my ILBE.
I''m going to run with it, scramble with it, climb with it and work with it and master
it like I master my tools and other gear. That way, if anything ever happened that I
had to didi from a 4 or 2 legged animal, I could do it knowing exactly how my body would
react to the weight, to the pack shifting, to what my personal capabilities were with the
pack on or if it being off me would be a better option in certain situations & circumstances.

I kind of got the inkling of an idea from doing squats with my pack loaded (with only 50lbs).
I thought to myself "what if I were chillaxin' by a fire with my pack on and I had to get up quick?
Could I do it?" At first, it was awkward to work with it, but like anything in life pretty much,
there is a method to everything and your body has to develop the muscles & movements
needed for certain actions that only come from developing them through use and practice.

Along with that, I'm also going to condition my body as well. Winter's going to be a great time
to do it too as I'll be able to burn calories at a much higher rate plus if I can do it in the cold first,
it'll be an easier transition to working out in the heat. Then again, I'm a creature of the outdoors when
it comes to working hard physically. I'm open to any suggestions or ideas you guys might have.
I'm a firm believer in "dry fire practice", either with a firearm, knife or survival equipment.... It plain works. I took my daughter out last week. Other than the firearm, she has mostly "dry-fire" practice with her equipment. She did superbly in a real survival scenario.

"Dry-fire" practice at home. Confirm your skills by testing them once or twice a month.
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