Canning emergency -- please help!! - Page 2 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Food and water Discussion on food and water storage, water purification and related topics.

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New to Canning-Canning Deli Meats? PA_Robert Food and water 13 11-08-2016 05:26 PM
Pressure Canning/Canning Meat MC Ain't Crazy Food and water 19 02-21-2016 01:44 PM
Free emergency Canteens = emergency life vest McGuyversurvivor Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 8 10-12-2014 11:13 PM
Difference between commercial canning and home canning ?? weeblessings4 Food and water 17 10-09-2013 11:42 AM
Emergency Heating & Canning Logistical Conflict - Need Suggestions tree369 Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 5 12-31-2012 02:29 PM
Canning for beginners: small-batch canning BrowserCat Food and water 9 11-03-2012 11:39 AM
waterBOB Emergency Drinking Water Storage - $20 + Free Shipping*, Emergency Filter $9 apps47inc For Sale 0 10-24-2012 07:38 PM
Canning meat w/o a pressure canner in an emergency obleo Food and water 17 09-20-2012 11:13 AM
Emergency Hand warmer - Warming hands is most important in emergency! tankman1989 Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 24 01-24-2012 06:18 AM
Emergency emergency fire starter. DngrsDan Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 2 12-25-2009 06:27 PM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-14-2011, 02:10 PM
Pangea Pangea is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Southern Tennessee
Posts: 5,236
Thanks: 5,314
Thanked 10,566 Times in 3,158 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

If you try to rush the depressurization cycle after canning, you will lose liquid from the jars. I tried to increase the turn around time on canning by wedging the pressure weight open a little after taking it from the hot stove eye. the pressure in the pot bled off faster, but the jars were doing the same thing. I lost most of the liquid from the jars and that batch of corn doesn't look very good now.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Pangea For This Useful Post:
Old 06-14-2011, 07:47 PM
cranky1950's Avatar
cranky1950 cranky1950 is offline
My Temperature is Right
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 5,578
Thanks: 1,323
Thanked 4,204 Times in 2,328 Posts
Default

Are you sure it's not this canner?


This a the same as the Fagor Duo. The manual is available at Fagor America.

http://www.fagoramerica.com/content/...anual 2008.pdf

Unfortunately, the number 1 setting is low pressure 8psi is less than the necessary 10psi to reach 240 deg F. You need to process at the #2 setting which is 15 psi. After browsing all the fagor manuals, the #1 setting of all dual pressure cookers is 8 psi.

You need to reprocess that food for storage.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to cranky1950 For This Useful Post:
Old 06-14-2011, 10:54 PM
patriot101's Avatar
patriot101 patriot101 is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,468
Thanks: 3,096
Thanked 2,378 Times in 884 Posts
Default

Although i opened one jar that was ok, I am worried about the rest and just purchased the right kind of canner. After reading what you just told me about all of my jars being done under 8 pounds of pressure, I guess the smart thing to do is get rid of all of the meats. Do you all think the veggies and butter need to be thrown away too?? Butter is getting so expensive here. We found sales and canned so many pounds of it during the winter months. Thank you to all for your advice, I know my families best interest is to be safe.
And yes, this canner you showed me looks like the one we're using.
Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-14-2011, 11:42 PM
cranky1950's Avatar
cranky1950 cranky1950 is offline
My Temperature is Right
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 5,578
Thanks: 1,323
Thanked 4,204 Times in 2,328 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by patriot101 View Post
Although i opened one jar that was ok, I am worried about the rest and just purchased the right kind of canner. After reading what you just told me about all of my jars being done under 8 pounds of pressure, I guess the smart thing to do is get rid of all of the meats. Do you all think the veggies and butter need to be thrown away too?? Butter is getting so expensive here. We found sales and canned so many pounds of it during the winter months. Thank you to all for your advice, I know my families best interest is to be safe.
And yes, this canner you showed me looks like the one we're using.
Canning butter is not recommended, but people do it anyway. If you followed the techniques numerous people have described on the internet, then it's up to you whether or not to keep the butter or not. That is a judgement for you to make.

In regards to the low acid veggies and meat canned at 8psi I can tell you that you can't detect botulism without a lab. It'll seem good as long as the jars are sealed.

Read through the canning guide at U Georgia. It's worth the time and it's free. http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to cranky1950 For This Useful Post:
Old 06-15-2011, 12:03 PM
PrincessKraken PrincessKraken is offline
I love this forum
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 24,610
Thanks: 17,504
Thanked 29,990 Times in 13,204 Posts
Default

Cross posting

Congrats on the new canner!



Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2011, 12:19 PM
SouthernBell SouthernBell is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 722
Thanks: 284
Thanked 569 Times in 350 Posts
Default

What you have is a pressure cooker...
8psi is not enough to kill spores, fungi, bacteria and viruses. The combonation of high temperatures under pressure is what kills the nastie beasties...

FYI: You would not want to be in a SHTF situation, with little or no access to proper medical care, eating improperly canned foods and find out you, your family and anyone else eating your food has Botulism.

According to USDA, a canner must be able to hold at least 4 quart jars, and have a gauge or weight to allow you to measure 5, 10, and 15 lbs. pressure. The size is important because a bigger canner takes longer to come to pressure and cool down again, and that time is factored into the processing time they give you. Complete USDA canning times and recipes are available at the National Center for Home Food Preservation, at http://www.uga.edu/nchfp. However, A pressure CANNER can also be used as a pressure COOKER, it is just a matter of whether or not you want to use such a huge pot to pressure cook something.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to SouthernBell For This Useful Post:
Old 06-15-2011, 12:28 PM
SouthernBell SouthernBell is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 722
Thanks: 284
Thanked 569 Times in 350 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cranky1950 View Post
Canning butter is not recommended, but people do it anyway. If you followed the techniques numerous people have described on the internet, then it's up to you whether or not to keep the butter or not. That is a judgement for you to make.

In regards to the low acid veggies and meat canned at 8psi I can tell you that you can't detect botulism without a lab. It'll seem good as long as the jars are sealed.

Read through the canning guide at U Georgia. It's worth the time and it's free. http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html
Would you seriousley want to risk Botulism poisoning in a SHTF situation where there is very limited or no access to medical care?
Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2011, 12:39 PM
cranky1950's Avatar
cranky1950 cranky1950 is offline
My Temperature is Right
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 5,578
Thanks: 1,323
Thanked 4,204 Times in 2,328 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBell View Post
Would you seriousley want to risk Botulism poisoning in a SHTF situation where there is very limited or no access to medical care?
Honestly that would depend on how hungry I was. In ordinary times no. But I can't tell others how to live their lives. Some here do things that I wouldn't do, but hopefully they are making what they consider to be informed decisions. There is a large subculture of folks who do not swear by the writings of the center for home food preservation.
Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2011, 12:55 PM
SouthernBell SouthernBell is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 722
Thanks: 284
Thanked 569 Times in 350 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cranky1950 View Post
Honestly that would depend on how hungry I was. In ordinary times no. But I can't tell others how to live their lives. Some here do things that I wouldn't do, but hopefully they are making what they consider to be informed decisions. There is a large subculture of folks who do not swear by the writings of the center for home food preservation.
I dont always agree with certain suggestions on the types of foods, and recipes. My decisions are based on trial, error, my experiences and what my gram taught me before all of the guidlines. I have been canning well over 30 years

I do however agree with the tried and true processing guidelines for pressures, times and temperatures....
Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2011, 02:14 PM
cranky1950's Avatar
cranky1950 cranky1950 is offline
My Temperature is Right
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 5,578
Thanks: 1,323
Thanked 4,204 Times in 2,328 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBell View Post
What you have is a pressure cooker...
8psi is not enough to kill spores, fungi, bacteria and viruses. The combonation of high temperatures under pressure is what kills the nastie beasties...

FYI: You would not want to be in a SHTF situation, with little or no access to proper medical care, eating improperly canned foods and find out you, your family and anyone else eating your food has Botulism.

According to USDA, a canner must be able to hold at least 4 quart jars, and have a gauge or weight to allow you to measure 5, 10, and 15 lbs. pressure. The size is important because a bigger canner takes longer to come to pressure and cool down again, and that time is factored into the processing time they give you. Complete USDA canning times and recipes are available at the National Center for Home Food Preservation, at http://www.uga.edu/nchfp. However, A pressure CANNER can also be used as a pressure COOKER, it is just a matter of whether or not you want to use such a huge pot to pressure cook something.
The fagor 10 qt cooker/canner meets USDA guidelines. It will hold 4 quart jars, vent air for 10 min and maintain 15psi through out the canning cycle. It doesn't matter if you can one jar or 50, so heat up and cool down do not matter, it's the time that the mass of food is immersed in 240 deg steam. Consistency of the food mass is more important than the pressure vessel as long as that pressure vessel will hold steam at 240 deg or better.

Cool down matters in that you do not dump the steam at the end of the process, but allow the jars to slowly cool to the point they do not boil out.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to cranky1950 For This Useful Post:
Old 06-15-2011, 11:14 PM
patriot101's Avatar
patriot101 patriot101 is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,468
Thanks: 3,096
Thanked 2,378 Times in 884 Posts
Default

I got my new canner today and am very happy! I'd like to send one of my jars to a lab to see if its dangerous out of curiousity, but dont know who would test it. I wonder if the local colleges do that sort of testing. I fell a lot safer now and am looking for sales on foods to can! My Ball Blue Book was also ordered and is on the way. Thanks everyone!
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to patriot101 For This Useful Post:
Old 06-15-2011, 11:25 PM
cranky1950's Avatar
cranky1950 cranky1950 is offline
My Temperature is Right
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 5,578
Thanks: 1,323
Thanked 4,204 Times in 2,328 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by patriot101 View Post
I got my new canner today and am very happy! I'd like to send one of my jars to a lab to see if its dangerous out of curiousity, but dont know who would test it. I wonder if the local colleges do that sort of testing. I fell a lot safer now and am looking for sales on foods to can! My Ball Blue Book was also ordered and is on the way. Thanks everyone!
Enjoy your new canner.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to cranky1950 For This Useful Post:
Old 06-16-2011, 12:10 AM
SouthernBell SouthernBell is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 722
Thanks: 284
Thanked 569 Times in 350 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cranky1950 View Post
Honestly that would depend on how hungry I was. In ordinary times no. But I can't tell others how to live their lives. Some here do things that I wouldn't do, but hopefully they are making what they consider to be informed decisions. There is a large subculture of folks who do not swear by the writings of the center for home food preservation.
Thats nice and just to educate you on the dangers of Botulism read the following....

Botulinum neurotoxin is considered one of the most potent, lethal substances known. As little as about 1 nanogram/kg can be lethal to an individual, and scientists have estimated that about 1 gram could potentially kill 1 million people. This small amount of toxin capable of killing humans has made the toxin a candidate for use in weapons for biowarfare and bioterrorism. All forms of botulism can be fatal and are considered medical emergencies. Food-borne botulism can be especially dangerous because many people can be poisoned by eating even small amounts of neurotoxin-contaminated food. A botulism outbreak is a public-health emergency that is reportable to the U.S. government.

http://www.medicinenet.com/botulism/article.htm
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to SouthernBell For This Useful Post:
Old 06-16-2011, 12:32 AM
cranky1950's Avatar
cranky1950 cranky1950 is offline
My Temperature is Right
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 5,578
Thanks: 1,323
Thanked 4,204 Times in 2,328 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBell View Post
Thats nice and just to educate you on the dangers of Botulism read the following....

Botulinum neurotoxin is considered one of the most potent, lethal substances known. As little as about 1 nanogram/kg can be lethal to an individual, and scientists have estimated that about 1 gram could potentially kill 1 million people. This small amount of toxin capable of killing humans has made the toxin a candidate for use in weapons for biowarfare and bioterrorism. All forms of botulism can be fatal and are considered medical emergencies. Food-borne botulism can be especially dangerous because many people can be poisoned by eating even small amounts of neurotoxin-contaminated food. A botulism outbreak is a public-health emergency that is reportable to the U.S. government.

http://www.medicinenet.com/botulism/article.htm
And your point is?
Quick reply to this message
Old 06-17-2011, 08:51 PM
keystone keystone is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 28
Thanks: 7
Thanked 62 Times in 22 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cranky1950 View Post
Canning butter is not recommended, but people do it anyway. If you followed the techniques numerous people have described on the internet, then it's up to you whether or not to keep the butter or not. That is a judgement for you to make.
I have canned butter, but I do it a little differently than most instructions, which are generally just open kettle canning (not recommended).

I melt salted butter, pour it into half pint jars, and then process them in a PRESSURE CANNER for 75min at 11lb. I let them cool to seal. After 24 hours, I put them in the oven at 200 degrees until melted, then allow to cool, shaking regularly to keep well mixed.

The results are not quite like the original butter -- definitely more grainy (though I'm going through the batch that accidentally went as high as 14lb during processing). It works well for baking and tastes fine when melted. I wouldn't butter my bread with it unless I didn't have an alternative (which I do, lots of canned jam!).

I have not yet tried my "good" batch, and it's all only been stored for about six months now, so no experience over the long haul.
Quick reply to this message
Old 06-18-2011, 12:21 PM
ColoradoGal's Avatar
ColoradoGal ColoradoGal is offline
optimistic pessimist
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Colorado
Age: 46
Posts: 1,221
Thanks: 1,286
Thanked 2,785 Times in 864 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by keystone View Post
DO NOT OPEN it, put the entire jar in the garbage to be taken to the dump..
Why not open it, throw it away and rewash the glass bottles?
Quick reply to this message
Reply

Bookmarks



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net