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Old 11-01-2013, 05:29 PM
12Charlie 12Charlie is offline
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When I enlisted in the mid 80's my father, a 2 tour Viet Nam vet gave me this bit of wisdom; "There is nothing so ****** up as the military during peace time". Guess what? It was true. From Leonard Wood to Germany I had CSM's that worried more about painted rocks and flower gardens than range time, PL's that stressed waxed floors over viable foreign driver's licenses (kind of a big deal when your company has to operate 5 ton trucks and construction boats and bridge parts), and many other annoying things.

That changed when things started heating up in (then) Yugoslavia and the Middle East. So stay safe and enjoy yourself, if you can. You give hope in the new generation and peace of mind to us old farts.
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Old 11-01-2013, 08:39 PM
KCFirepower KCFirepower is offline
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Wait til you get back. You'll stare at stuff. You'll be bored. You'll feel like all the dumb crap you do for work is insignificant. You'll see people as stupid and trivial a lot...and coddled.
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Old 11-01-2013, 08:46 PM
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Good luck. Shoot straight. And stay safe.
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Old 11-01-2013, 09:00 PM
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This is the AK47 assault rifle, the preferred weapon of your enemy. It makes a distinct sound when fired - so remember it.

- Gunny Highway


Stay safe OP.
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Old 11-01-2013, 09:34 PM
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JBryan, Be safe and I'll keep you in my prayers.
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Old 11-01-2013, 09:55 PM
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Just be careful and watch yourself. It's easy to start goofing around and miss something that may kill you. Keep your head turning and watch everything.

And stay safe young man.
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Old 11-01-2013, 10:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usmc0341 View Post
Piece of advice..

If you hear a CRACK nearby.. Its probably close..

If it whines then its a ricochet and you might want to move a bit.

If it whizzes then don't worry about it..

Moving targets are harder to hit than stationary given everything else is equal.. Keep moving..

I think Col Jeff Cooper said. " if you aren't shooting you should be reloading, if you are not reloading then you should be moving and communicating, if you are doing none of these then your probably gonna get nailed to a post by a goblin... Or something to that effect.

Don't drop your muzzle while holding a danger area. If your muzzle is not in it then you don't own it.

You never hear the one that gets you so if your hearing rounds then your still G2G
yep, second that one. and will also add, if you hear a snap and feel a breeze go across your face fall limp. had it happen in 03, sniper thought he got me but the mortar team got him . stay safe and watch your step.
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Old 11-01-2013, 10:43 PM
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Please stay safe and thank you for your service.

Like you, I begged and volunteered for "the real deal" when I was in and the closest I got was a support deployment during Bosnia. The peacetime dulldrums led me to get out after my enlistment. A year later 9-11 happened and I was chomping at the bit to go back in but my new wife (and Naval Ofiicer) talked me out of it.

A few years later while in a waiting room on base I picked up a magazine and saw some familiar faces on the back of it. It was a group photo of my NMCB-14 brothers recieving Purple hearts. 16 wounded 7 killed in a mortar attack while doing humanitarian construction projects in Iraq. As strange as it sounds, I wish I was there with them.

Good luck to you.
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Old 11-01-2013, 10:49 PM
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Default be careful my friend, that is a rush thats a double edge knife...

Quote:
Originally Posted by JBryan314 View Post
I have finally gotten the big payoff I was looking for. After 3 years of training and being stuck in the most garbage units the Army has to offer, I've finally been rewarded.

Going outside the wire on missions in Afghanistan is the reward I deserved for the work I put in. Biggest adrenaline rush I've ever had. Doubt I'll ever find one like it anywhere but in a combat zone.

I consider myself immensely lucky to have the chance to do this "high speed" stuff in Afghanistan, considering that I'm not in a combat arms MOS and I'm not SF or Airborne or anything like that. I'm just in a MOS that goes outside the wire to do my job and thanks to my constant begging and pushing, my leadership and the leadership in my attached combat arms unit has seen fit to send me out 4-5 times per week.

I'm not really sure of the point of this post. I guess I'm just pumped that finally, FINALLY, I'm able to pick up my weapon and go into harm's way to do my job the way I am supposed to do it. I see now that there is nothing that compares to the feeling you get when you step out of the Humvee/Stryker/MAT-V/MAXXPRO and walk out into a combat zone.
been there myself, problem is after a while its extremely difficult to walk away from. a lot of those that get too deep, never really ever come back . and then there are the ones, that dance with the devil a lil too long, and ya come back in pieces, or in a bag. temper the rush with realization. It 's been years since I was in a hot LZ, and to this day I still get the itch. you look for anything to replace it, some of tha things you did before, and they just come out boring or bland, then you find yourself, after 6 months out, re-enlisting to go back for just 1 more tour.......
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Old 11-01-2013, 10:55 PM
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Like many have already said... there is nothing like combat to make you feel that way. It is almost like a drug. Coming home and readjusting is the hardest part I have found.
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Old 11-02-2013, 01:06 AM
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The very best to you Soldier.........When you get my age you will have those memories some good many bad.....There is nothing like being in the Military....
Stay safe and never let your guard down.....Keep posting to us here...
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Old 11-02-2013, 02:08 AM
Herd Sniper Herd Sniper is online now
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Also pay attention to the local people around you. If the locals start to hide, runaway or disappear, get ready because you're already inside of an ambush zone and the fight is about to begin.

If none of the locals walk across a certain or very specific intersection that will mean a sniper covers it. They have been told not to walk across the intersection because anybody walking across it will get shot and he's waiting for you and yours.

Watch for the towers around your position too. The people who live in the towers may be using the towers to signal which way you're going on patrol when you leave your base camp. They used to do that to us in Viet Nam. If we left our perimeter headed east, somebody would put out a flag on the east side of the tower to let whoever know that we had headed east. Once we knew that they had marked us, we'd switch directions and loop around through some hills. Drove them nuts to see us come back in from the west or vice versa when we were through with our patrol.
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Old 11-02-2013, 04:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBryan314 View Post
I have finally gotten the big payoff I was looking for. After 3 years of training and being stuck in the most garbage units the Army has to offer, I've finally been rewarded.

Going outside the wire on missions in Afghanistan is the reward I deserved for the work I put in. Biggest adrenaline rush I've ever had. Doubt I'll ever find one like it anywhere but in a combat zone.

I consider myself immensely lucky to have the chance to do this "high speed" stuff in Afghanistan, considering that I'm not in a combat arms MOS and I'm not SF or Airborne or anything like that. I'm just in a MOS that goes outside the wire to do my job and thanks to my constant begging and pushing, my leadership and the leadership in my attached combat arms unit has seen fit to send me out 4-5 times per week.

I'm not really sure of the point of this post. I guess I'm just pumped that finally, FINALLY, I'm able to pick up my weapon and go into harm's way to do my job the way I am supposed to do it. I see now that there is nothing that compares to the feeling you get when you step out of the Humvee/Stryker/MAT-V/MAXXPRO and walk out into a combat zone.
I can't possibly relate! All I can say is THANK YOU for your service, God bless and may you come home safe to all who love you!
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Old 11-02-2013, 08:09 AM
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Soldiers are quite brave for going into combat, since they risk having their arms and legs blown off. Death doesn't hurt once it's happened. Their families are more brave though IMO, as if s/he gets killed or seriously injured they suffer the longest.
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Old 11-04-2013, 03:15 AM
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Something I noticed and thought was weird about this deployment is the way some of the people act around the bases. I told some privates the other day to walk with their head up. It's a reflex for people walking on uneven ground like we have over to look at the ground to ensure their footing is stable as they walk. But around here, an angry Afghan guard could get within 5 feet of you before pulling the trigger if you're looking down. They thought I was paranoid for telling them that and for telling them to adjust their holsters so they could reach their M9 easily. Some E-5 heard me telling them that and told me to quit acting like I was some "grizzled war vet" around the privates. I asked which part of my advice was unsound, and he had no answer. I said "**** off" and walked off. He started saying something to the tune of finding my first line supervisor and reporting me for disrespect. My first line would tell him to **** off too.

I guess it just surprises me. When I'm in the gunner's turret, I point out every piece of junk I see on the side of the road and every low riding vehicle that come near us. I had one infantry dude tell me I didn't need to do that because he wasn't going to report it to anyone else anyway.

WTF? We still have people getting hurt over here and half the people deployed to my FOB don't seem to understand that this isn't a field exercise...
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Old 11-04-2013, 03:28 AM
0621vet 0621vet is offline
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thanks to the guy that put that one out there. Stay safe brother. I know the feeling, my first tour over was completely inside the wire. The second, not so much, I was excited at first as well. You can only kick in so many doors though.
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Old 11-04-2013, 05:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBryan314 View Post
Something I noticed and thought was weird about this deployment is the way some of the people act around the bases. I told some privates the other day to walk with their head up. It's a reflex for people walking on uneven ground like we have over to look at the ground to ensure their footing is stable as they walk. But around here, an angry Afghan guard could get within 5 feet of you before pulling the trigger if you're looking down. They thought I was paranoid for telling them that and for telling them to adjust their holsters so they could reach their M9 easily. Some E-5 heard me telling them that and told me to quit acting like I was some "grizzled war vet" around the privates. I asked which part of my advice was unsound, and he had no answer. I said "**** off" and walked off. He started saying something to the tune of finding my first line supervisor and reporting me for disrespect. My first line would tell him to **** off too.

I guess it just surprises me. When I'm in the gunner's turret, I point out every piece of junk I see on the side of the road and every low riding vehicle that come near us. I had one infantry dude tell me I didn't need to do that because he wasn't going to report it to anyone else anyway.

WTF? We still have people getting hurt over here and half the people deployed to my FOB don't seem to understand that this isn't a field exercise...
I was a contractor during my time in Afghanistan and we had some major problems at that time between the Afghan Army and Americans. A few were stabbed on the FOBs and we had some fights break out. Body language (head up, alert, confident looking etc) plays a large part in that. If a soldier is ready, looks confident and is not alone (that is VERY important) they are less likely to be involved in an altercation.
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Old 11-04-2013, 06:48 AM
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I carry my M9 with a round in the chamber at all times.
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Old 11-04-2013, 07:10 AM
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JBryan314, don't know you but I sure respect you for numerous reasons. First for wanting to, then for acting on your want to, then for putting into words feelings I had 40+ years ago.

In my war few had the want to, even fewer acted if they did have it. After doing our job we came home unable to articulate our feelings. Maybe some where in this post is why we never got the deserved respect and are considered to be members of the losing team by those who didn't go.

I am VERY PROUD of you, don't be CAREFUL it will get you killed, be GOOD and come home.
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Old 11-04-2013, 07:12 AM
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I look forward to your posts JB, I guess us old farts just like to feel that rush one more time. Just make sure you do the things that allow you to continue to post, like stay safe and alive. I understand the want to do the job you've been trained to do and to lead into harms way, however, don't forget there are those who are counting on you to come home safe and in one peice when your time is done.

Keep your head on a swivel, trust no one, see everything, take nothing for granted.

Come home safe son......
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