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Old 11-01-2013, 07:48 PM
madscotsman26 madscotsman26 is offline
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We speaking dif language lol, the best pelt price I ever got was for the golden fox.

All I ran was conibear.

Just got off the phone with the BIL; mink, coon, fox etc.. max pelt = $5.00

Rat etc...= 25 cents
You should try F&T Supply.

We get much better prices because the winter is more brutal and the critters diets are richer, that equals incredible loft in the furs with much thicker undercoats . A World of Differance in Quality. We have exclusive buyers (Canadian and American) that don't mess with going rates. These people offer top top rates.
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Old 11-01-2013, 07:53 PM
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You should try F&T Supply.

We get much better prices because the winter is more brutal and the critters diets are richer, that equals incredible loft in the furs with much thicker undercoats . A World of Differance in Quality. We have exclusive buyers (Canadian and American) that don't mess with going rates. These people offer top top rates.
The BIL is in yankee land, Pa Oh Wv NY area.

Meh, I'm babying the last watermellon
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Old 11-01-2013, 08:27 PM
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It takes a long time to 'finish' a house. We got our fruit / nut trees in right away. We put in more raised beds each year.

Still trying to get honey bees to survive to the next year.
I know it's a problem with the honey bees but I'm determined to give them a go. We'll see how it works out.
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Old 11-01-2013, 09:26 PM
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My uncle was a honey bee/hive farmer and it was always scary and fun to go to his house and "assist" while he pulled out bars of honeycomb. He did it as a labor of love and never sold any even though he gave away gallons every year (complete with comb chunks in it).

One thing he mentioned was that you never repaint or touch up the dwellings. He had hives that resembled flat roof dog houses (elevated on 2 by 4s) and they looked like bee ghettos. I guess old beat-up wood kept the bees productive.
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Old 11-02-2013, 01:19 AM
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Kind of the same boat, but my wife can't wait to leave for some place else. NY is horrible... growing up here I was a sheep for along time.. the zombies are all ready here... started waking up in my mid 20s and got a bigger kick in the pants after my first was born .. now with 2 little girls, we don't want them growing up here. So tx is top on the list.. we were just looking at new Hampshire today.. sister Inlaw is in AZ.. we'll probably be broke for a while but its crazy that making 80k in NY and still living pay check to pay check is the norm (unless all you eat is crap)... my advise, get out asap...
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Old 11-02-2013, 01:31 AM
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I started out living in Chicago proper. Then in the more rural bits of Maryland.
Finally ended up in the NW Mtns of Georgia. Course I ain't young so the slow pace suits me. Still, within a 30 mile radius there are 18 or so high schools your wife could choose from. And 2 good colleges. Construction per se isn't booming, but there are always jobs in the utilities.

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Old 11-02-2013, 08:26 AM
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Originally Posted by madscotsman26 View Post
Somebody say my name in Vain?

Tell em Brother how good it is here.
The Resources are a little tough to get to sometimes, especially if you live in remote areas. But any inconvenience seems trivial in exchange for the peace and quiet, not to mention the clean rich growing soil and clean Air.
The community here is unique. Posters on the forum talk about wanting to live in a community of survivalists. Here we lose power every month, it may be for 4 hours, or it may be for 4 days, you never know. But it has been this way forever, so the locals are not phased by it. Everyone here who is on-the-grid shifts from having power, to being powerless without skipping a beat.

Off-grid homes are fairly common too.

Everyone hunts and fishes. Everyone forages fiddleheads, some go for mushrooms.

I have not gotten into trapping yet, though I do allow trappers on my land. The woods are loaded with game, big and small.

Southerners seem to have a big fear of snow. [I am not here to insult Southerners, I have lived there] When I lived in Ct, every home had someone who shoveled snow. But up here, people are used to seeing snow, so they all have equipment to handle it. Unregistered old beater trucks with plow blades mounted are very common. I use a tractor mounted snow-blower. Very few people here use shovels. I do not use a shovel.

Another thing that I love about living here is the low crime. My vehicle keys are left in the vehicle. Our home was only locked when I was installing the door locks. Homes here are not locked.

It is a different kind of culture here. As near to a survival-prepper community as you will find anywhere.
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Old 11-02-2013, 08:30 AM
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Yuk, I grew up in that stuff, only thang good with winter is the hunting. Other than that Yuk.

As a 10 to 17 y/o I ran two 50 trap lines, O dark 30 before chores and school and o dark freezing after chores and dinner.
Winter does happen.

At least winter is not wet. I think that from all of our travels before settling in Maine, what I dislike more about wintering in other places was that winter was wet. We may see one more 'rain' this season, we just had 2 days of rain, so now it is muddy. But soon the ground will be solid, and we will not see any rain until April.
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Old 11-02-2013, 08:34 AM
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You would be in Trapper heaven here, there is everything here, and the best quality pelts.
I Trap Bear, Beaver, linx, bobcat, fisher, And now Mountain lion that are sneaking in. We have a few Wolves but everybody mostly agrees to leave them alone for now so they can get better established.
A bear is taken from my land every year.

We seem to have a steady supply of beaver here too. There is a beaver lodge about 100 yards from my house
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Old 11-02-2013, 08:54 AM
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Winter does happen.

At least winter is not wet. I think that from all of our travels before settling in Maine, what I dislike more about wintering in other places was that winter was wet. We may see one more 'rain' this season, we just had 2 days of rain, so now it is muddy. But soon the ground will be solid, and we will not see any rain until April.


I'll have to agree with you on this. I've lived in the Rockies and the far north and although I'm not crazy about winter, the snow can be enjoyable. In VA, my winters most times consist of freezing and thawing hovering just above and below the freezing point all winter. Ice and mud, ice and mud. At least it doesn't last more than a few months.
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Old 11-02-2013, 08:56 AM
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I know it's a problem with the honey bees but I'm determined to give them a go. We'll see how it works out.
I was at a beekeeper meeting Thursday evening [yes they scheduled it for Halloween night], the guest speaker was a USDA researcher who is 6 years into a bee health research project.

He presented a lot of data. The USDA has seven test sites going [Cali, Washington, Texas, La, Fl, Wi, and Me]

The guys that really produce the most foundation wax are the trucking beekeepers with 30,000 to 40,000 hives. They rotate through Agribusiness regions, and they suffer 30 to 40% losses consistently. Because they make large amounts of wax, they sell it cheap to the beekeeper supply outlets. The result is that brand new fresh foundation sheets are loaded with a mixture of 98 different pesticides.

In Maine we are not a big Agribusiness region. There are places with 5,000 acres of blueberries, and others with potatoes, or broccoli. But over 92% of Maine is forest. So for a hobby beekeeper here, located in forest, the biggest source of pesticides for the hives, is the foundation sheet.

All of that pesticide kills a lot of bees.

There is also an assortment of viruses that are carried by mites. To control the viruses, we have to first control the mites.

When a colony dies, burn the frames, and seriously consider burning the boxes. Start each colony with new boxes and new frames.

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Old 11-02-2013, 09:06 AM
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Originally Posted by ForestBeekeeper View Post
The community here is unique. Posters on the forum talk about wanting to live in a community of survivalists. Here we lose power every month, it may be for 4 hours, or it may be for 4 days, you never know. But it has been this way forever, so the locals are not phased by it. Everyone here who is on-the-grid shifts from having power, to being powerless without skipping a beat.

Off-grid homes are fairly common too.

Everyone hunts and fishes. Everyone forages fiddleheads, some go for mushrooms.

I have not gotten into trapping yet, though I do allow trappers on my land. The woods are loaded with game, big and small.

Southerners seem to have a big fear of snow. [I am not here to insult Southerners, I have lived there] When I lived in Ct, every home had someone who shoveled snow. But up here, people are used to seeing snow, so they all have equipment to handle it. Unregistered old beater trucks with plow blades mounted are very common. I use a tractor mounted snow-blower. Very few people here use shovels. I do not use a shovel.

Another thing that I love about living here is the low crime. My vehicle keys are left in the vehicle. Our home was only locked when I was installing the door locks. Homes here are not locked.

It is a different kind of culture here. As near to a survival-prepper community as you will find anywhere.
Have kin in Hope and Rockport, as a youngin I always looked forward to the blueberries and lobster when we went and visited.
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Old 11-02-2013, 09:06 AM
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Kind of the same boat, but my wife can't wait to leave for some place else. NY is horrible... growing up here I was a sheep for along time.. the zombies are all ready here... started waking up in my mid 20s and got a bigger kick in the pants after my first was born .. now with 2 little girls, we don't want them growing up here. So tx is top on the list.. we were just looking at new Hampshire today.. sister Inlaw is in AZ.. we'll probably be broke for a while but its crazy that making 80k in NY and still living pay check to pay check is the norm (unless all you eat is crap)... my advise, get out asap...
An old friend of mine lives in DC, she makes around $125k [as does her hubby] their home is 'underwater' [they owe around $300k on it, but it is only worth $150k], all of their money is going into their COL. No savings, no investments, living paycheck-to-paycheck.

At the same time, I look around and I see families in low COL areas who are earning $25k/year, and they are getting by [raising children, TVs, cars, etc].

In a high COL area getting a big salary is still not good. The reason they pay a lot is because it costs that much to scrap by in that area.



Two families who own camps here in my township work down in NH, I think they actually live in Portland Me. I talk to them each summer when they come up for vacation. It sounds like NH is a lot better than Mass or NY.

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Old 11-02-2013, 09:07 AM
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I Moved to Northern Maine From Virginia 7 years ago and love it.
Everything you are looking for in a location is here, plus dirt cheap taxes and below market land prices. I Bought my 30 acre farm and house for 31 thousand bucks and pay less than $500 a year for taxes. There are hundreds of thousands of acres of Wilderness areas, most of it totally undesignated territory like it was 200 years ago.


I like Maine very well. I looked into it real seriously a few years ago when land prices (and taxes) were escalating out of sight. Made several trips there looking and because of the vast difference in land prices, I was saying jokingly (alright maybe not just jokingly) that I could go from being a Virginia hillbilly to being Maine country gentleman very quickly. For a person starting out with a little nest egg, it would be one of the best choices (although good places actually do abound all over the country).
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Old 11-02-2013, 10:48 AM
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I like Maine very well. I looked into it real seriously a few years ago when land prices (and taxes) were escalating out of sight. Made several trips there looking and because of the vast difference in land prices, I was saying jokingly (alright maybe not just jokingly) that I could go from being a Virginia hillbilly to being Maine country gentleman very quickly. For a person starting out with a little nest egg, it would be one of the best choices (although good places actually do abound all over the country).
I cashed out most of our portfolio, when we moved to Maine. We bought a lot more land than I had ever dreamed of getting, and we built a home.

What has totally surprised me is the culture here of small self-sufficient farms, and very independent people.

I see a lot of threads about forming communities of survivalist-preppers. But then I look around, and that 'community' is pretty much already here.
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Old 11-02-2013, 06:59 PM
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I have pretty much the same situation where I live in the mountains of VA. People who live a mostly modern lifestyle but are still close to the land and self sustainability. Last weekend a local church group spent two days making apple butter, a few hundred gallons, an annual thing as a fund raiser. A lot of similar community activity on a regular basis. In less than two weeks I'm going to a seminar on cheese making at the community center. I'm also taking EMT classes with the rescue squad. All in all, and I've covered a lot of territory, and in just about every way I can imagine a world changing event, our local community would have the ability to not only survive but thrive and maintain. Not entirely devoid of pettiness but the local people are unusually welcoming, friendly and accepting.

No formal talk that I know about in relation to survival but just seeing the general makeup and community mindedness of the people, I have no serious doubts of our ability to come together in a crises. There are still a lot of the old homesteading skills around plus some excellent craftsmen too. Hunting and guns are a big part of the culture.
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Old 11-04-2013, 11:59 AM
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Was checking out that free state project site that was posted. Love nh moto, live free or die.. so we are looking at Texas and now nh.. nh is looking promising.. yup, wet winters suck.. we have that a lot here in NY...

FBK, is there a good site for checking out main?

-edited for auto-correct madness-
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Old 11-04-2013, 05:06 PM
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... FBK, is there a good site for checking out maine?
http://www.city-data.com/forum/maine/ Is good if you want to talk with Mainers who are the most 'main-stream'.



http://maineguides.com/ and http://www.maineguides.org/ Guides are folks who are certified to be able to take a group into the Maine woods, and make sure you survive. Their school teaches a person to make shelter, food, clothing, from little more than a pocket knife. Summer or winter makes no difference.

I know a few guides, they are fairly hard core.



Also look at http://www.mofga.org/Home/tabid/74/Default.aspx

MOFGA has over 10,000 members.

They host our annual survivalist - homesteader fair: http://www.mofga.org/TheFair/tabid/135/Default.aspx [which draws in 25,000 - 30,000 people each day]

They network all of the Farmer's Markets statewide.

They coordinate the Apprenticeship / Journeyman programs. They start with people who are not experienced with farming, get you into farming, and eventually onto their own farm.

Also MOFGA is our regional Organic certifying agency.

There is a forum for Maine farmers - homesteaders http://www.mofga.net/Forums/tabid/56/Default.aspx Though it does not get much traffic.



If you were interested in buying land from a realtor http://acresaway.mainelistings.com/ is good.

Also https://www.facebook.com/pages/Roger...50648584981890 is good. http://www.northernmainelandman.com/about.shtml Roger focuses more on bare land, remote camps, and survivalist retreats.

Of course keep in mind that all realtors tend to handle properties asking higher prices. They have over-head, listings, websites, and they may take clients around to see properties, etc. So it costs more to use a realtor.

The other alternative is to drive around in Maine, talk to locals, and meet foresters who own multiple parcels of land. This is what I did, and I got much lower prices.
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