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Old 02-12-2017, 09:34 AM
reppans reppans is offline
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Default How do you justify the contents of your GHB?



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I EDC a 10lb/L messenger bag/murse, which is also my GHB. I'm into ultra-light backpacking and extreme multi-tasking to justify EDC'ing my camping gear. eg, 12oz tent that's also does rain poncho and down vest; dehydrated vodka (grain alcohol) that's also fuel for my stove(1oz), cleaner, solvent, sterilizer; flashlight that's also a lantern, headlamp, and runs on any battery for hundreds of hours; etc.

My one big hole is bedding - haven't figured out how to EDC good sleeping insulation without ruining it by keeping it stuffed. Maybe mylar bivy bag stuffed with crumpled newspaper or leaf debris for a hobo quilt will suffice.
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Old 02-12-2017, 10:35 AM
StayFrosty StayFrosty is offline
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Originally Posted by DesertDawn View Post
Ten miles on foot in adverse conditions could be a long walk home, so I'd be inclined to think long and light. My primary GHB weighs about 20 lbs, minus water. It does have a silcock key, small multi tool, the tent, heavier weight space blanket, 2 mylar blankets, MRE components and Datex bar, metal canteen cup and cook stand, 3 types of fire starter w/ Vaseline cotton balls and 2 tea lights (in case of wind, light one in the canteen cup to preserve other fire starters), small FAK, small katadyn water filter, Larry light and Black Diamond mini lantern, and the usual personal sanitation gear. EDC includes knife, firearm w/xtra mag, 2 oz silver, lighter and flashlight.
Your bag makes a lot of sense to me. The one thing that I am curious about tis the 2oz of silver. How did you come to add that to your bag?
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Old 02-12-2017, 12:21 PM
sabrecrash sabrecrash is offline
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I keep a bag in the truck that has what I need for 72 hrs at least. I would just remove what I need and head home if I was close.
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Old 02-12-2017, 12:22 PM
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If it doesn't fall into one of these categories (i.e., will it get me home?), then it should not be in your GHB and/or on your person when you abandon your vehicle:

1) Lightweight food that can be prepared and eaten on the go. I chose either mostly dried food (jerky, nuts, etc.) or freeze dried food. Some way to heat the food is optional - i.e., a small alcohol stove.

2) Water/hydration (includes a compact lightweight water filter)

3) Shelter (includes clothes that will keep me dry and warm [or cool in the heat]).

4) Footwear meant for walking a good distance and over rough terrain.

5) FAK

6) Security/protection - typically, minimal and lightweight.

7) Navigation and communication - again, small and lightweight.

8) Toilet paper - somewhat optional, but lightweight and can be used for first aid.
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Old 02-12-2017, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by ReadyAPR View Post
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Really, my GHB is overpacked. My truck is overpacked as well. The reason I have for it is, at least it is with me at the start. I can always dump stuff as needed or give away as needed. I may stay with my truck for a bit and "work from it".
I agree, and this is the way I am set up too.
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Old 02-12-2017, 01:23 PM
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These lists always make me laugh a bit, but it's good to get ideas.

IMO, people really forget what GHB stands for... GET HOME BAG. Not hang out in the woods for 72 hours. Not build a fire and cook dinner bag, GET HOME. Your primary objective is movement, and movement towards your HOME. At home you have shelter, water, supplies, etc. Where do you spend most of your days?

My primary travel is work related. 22 miles on highways. I've cycled to work in 1.5 hours. I know all the zig zags to get there. The midwest is quite easy to navigate with north/south and east/west roads... If you really live in the middle of nowhere woods, with no roads, then your practical list will differ. This is my practical list:

1) Training/Experience/Mindset: I've done 200 mile cycling trips in a day, Ironmans, Marathons, etc. Pushing your body to the extremes of it's capability teaches you to push on. Experiencing that struggle to push forward, Continual Forward Progress. Now I strength train, so I'm not as lightweight/fast anymore, but I still have that mindset to endure.

2) Shelter: In this case that would be outdoor clothing, water proof, wind proof, breathable, warm/cool depending on climate. Building a shelter is counter productive to your primary goal of movement. You should be able to walk a marathon in < 10 hours. You can easily go without sleep for one night. Endure it.

3) Water: Just enough, plus a little extra, to get home. For me that's about a liter or two for a full day of hiking. Endurance training taught me to regulate my water consumption, small sips every 15 minutes. Chugging water leaves you bloated. If I had to stretch another day, I could. Keeping a water bladder to fill up at work if needed, and a lightweight filter system. Fill up with snow in winter and keep near body to melt.

4) Food: candy bar or two? Snickers bars work quite well for curbing hunger. Your goal is to get home, where you have food. That is a strong motivator.

5) IFAK: just in case, always in the car. Currently updating.

6) Defense: I'm not allowed to carry at work, but good option if you can.

7) EDC: multitool/knife, flashlight, etc, always there anyways.


Writing out these lists is a good way to update and review your systems.

Edit: I do keep a wool blanket, and 2 survival blankets in the car. Sleeping in my car is actually quite common for me... way cheaper than a hotel!
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Old 02-12-2017, 02:13 PM
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My GHB was seasonal. During late autumn and winter, it included an extra pair of dry woolen socks, gloves and winterized hiking boots. During the warmer months, those came out and were replaced with athletic socks and tennis shoes.

The stuff that never changed were a rain poncho, a very small and simple first aid kit, a water bottle, a small amount of cash ($40), a sawyer water filter and some toilet paper. That was about it. My EDC stuff is always on me and not in my GHB.
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Old 02-12-2017, 03:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J4C3 View Post
These lists always make me laugh a bit, but it's good to get ideas.

IMO, people really forget what GHB stands for... GET HOME BAG. Not hang out in the woods for 72 hours. Not build a fire and cook dinner bag, GET HOME. Your primary objective is movement, and movement towards your HOME. At home you have shelter, water, supplies, etc. Where do you spend most of your days?

My primary travel is work related. 22 miles on highways. I've cycled to work in 1.5 hours. I know all the zig zags to get there. The midwest is quite easy to navigate with north/south and east/west roads... If you really live in the middle of nowhere woods, with no roads, then your practical list will differ. This is my practical list:

1) Training/Experience/Mindset: I've done 200 mile cycling trips in a day, Ironmans, Marathons, etc. Pushing your body to the extremes of it's capability teaches you to push on. Experiencing that struggle to push forward, Continual Forward Progress. Now I strength train, so I'm not as lightweight/fast anymore, but I still have that mindset to endure.

2) Shelter: In this case that would be outdoor clothing, water proof, wind proof, breathable, warm/cool depending on climate. Building a shelter is counter productive to your primary goal of movement. You should be able to walk a marathon in < 10 hours. You can easily go without sleep for one night. Endure it.

3) Water: Just enough, plus a little extra, to get home. For me that's about a liter or two for a full day of hiking. Endurance training taught me to regulate my water consumption, small sips every 15 minutes. Chugging water leaves you bloated. If I had to stretch another day, I could. Keeping a water bladder to fill up at work if needed, and a lightweight filter system. Fill up with snow in winter and keep near body to melt.

4) Food: candy bar or two? Snickers bars work quite well for curbing hunger. Your goal is to get home, where you have food. That is a strong motivator.

5) IFAK: just in case, always in the car. Currently updating.

6) Defense: I'm not allowed to carry at work, but good option if you can.

7) EDC: multitool/knife, flashlight, etc, always there anyways.


Writing out these lists is a good way to update and review your systems.

Edit: I do keep a wool blanket, and 2 survival blankets in the car. Sleeping in my car is actually quite common for me... way cheaper than a hotel!
I agree - it is a Get Home Bag and it should be kept to a minimum.

However a few issues:

a) Not everybody is in the best of health. I used to be - not so much anymore. Hell I did my first century on a bicycle before most people on this forum were born. I used to be able to go for a day or two without food or sleep. I've hiked a good distance per day too. Can't do that anymore. I've suffered some injuries and health problems in my 6+ decades and I've been sick the last couple of months - if I had to walk more than a single mile tomorrow I would probably keel over. I am getting better - I was just out chopping and stacking firewood for the first time in months, but I have to take breaks ever 20 minutes or so. A few weeks ago I would be lying on the ground if I tried to do that.

b) Food is important. Even the strongest most healthy person will start to drag after a day without food. You mentioned movement, preferably fast movement. I agree - hence the minimal items, and the lightest weight items a person can find and afford. That is why I am willing to pay a penny a calorie to have lightweight freeze dried food in my GHB instead of a tenth that cost for 3 times the weight.

c) The most direct route from my home (BOL) to my workplace is 30 miles. Given the shape I usually am in, I doubt I could make more than ten miles a day walking, and it is quite probable that if I had to walk home it would be because of an earthquake, which would mean I would be walking at least 40 to 50 miles quite possibly 60+ miles, to get around obstructions, and that doesn't count the creeks and rivers I would have to cross.

That means I would be walking at least 3 days if I am lucky, quite possibly as much as a week, to get home. After the first day, I am definitely going to need more than a candy bar to keep me going. It is possible that I could find food along the way as I would be passing through an urban/suburban area the first couple of days and I would have cash, but I would not want to depend on it.
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Old 02-12-2017, 06:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Heretic View Post
I agree - it is a Get Home Bag and it should be kept to a minimum.

However a few issues:
That means I would be walking at least 3 days if I am lucky, quite possibly as much as a week, to get home. After the first day, I am definitely going to need more than a candy bar to keep me going. It is possible that I could find food along the way as I would be passing through an urban/suburban area the first couple of days and I would have cash, but I would not want to depend on it.
Thank you for your feedback! This helps me understand why peoples GHB are so different. Not just distance but also health and abilities. This helps me think of all angles.
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Old 02-12-2017, 09:11 PM
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There are a lot of things to consider when deciding on the contents of a BOB, GHB, 3 day or whatever we want to call them.Not trying to sound negative but it boils down to a sack of supplies for the task at hand.
All of the replies on this thread are good. Carrying everything for a broad range of "events" is almost impossible, you have to be creative. If you have immediate family members to rendezvous with because with my luck they will not be at home just hanging out, where will they be at the exact moment the "event" happened? Will you have to go from location to location to retrieve them? Work on a emergency plan with them now so you may have a little "piece of mind" during all of the chaos. I can't stress enough how much difference "keeping your head" makes in a stressful situation.
Another point to focus on is to what degree will you be willing to help others during your journey? I'm sure that this could be a touchy subject in itself. Not just whether your willing but the ramifications if you do or don't.
I've found that I do some of my best work when I ask a lot of questions instead of a few.
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Old 02-12-2017, 09:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Heretic View Post
I agree - it is a Get Home Bag and it should be kept to a minimum.

However a few issues:...
Very true. Physical condition plays a role, but you can plan for that as well. Sounds like you're already making progress chopping wood! Start small and work your way back, there's always progress to be made.

I know I can make it home in a single day, so I know I can get by with minimal food. (I've done 12 hour races on sugar water: gatorade, and salt) No doubt I'll be hungry when I get there. I may throw in an MRE, 1 meal doesn't really add much weight.

Terrain will change your plans too. I have many routes to get home, they are all roughly the same distance, and they are all boringly flat.
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Old 02-13-2017, 12:27 AM
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I noticed that Wal-Mart is selling 3 day survival bags. I think the food packs inside were rated for five years. If I keep one of these in my vehicle year round, will the extreme temps reduce that? Does anyone know who makes their food packs and what length of time they are normally rated for? If I swapped them out for Mountain House, how many years could I expect with the seasonal temp extremes?
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Old 02-13-2017, 09:01 AM
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My GHB doubles as my EDC, it's pretty small and weights around 10 lbs (not counting my work laptop). Basically it's built to get my from center city philly to my home in the burbs.

Pistol and extra mag - I work in the city, getting home might get hairy
Leatherman - Having this tool is just common sense for the size and weight
Silcock Key - Route is through city/residential area so this tool gets me access to water
Small Flashlight - Who knows when it happens, maybe I'm working late, or the power goes out in my building.
Light Raincoat - Because getting wet sucks
Prana Pants - Not really needed, but my bag has the room
Base Layers - Because being cold sucks
Extra Wool Socks - Your feet might get wet, you will need a backup
Trail Runners - Walking home in dress shoes is doable, but rather not
Water Bladder - So I can stay hydrated
Iodine Crystals - Not really needed in the city, but worth the size and weight
Lighter - Sometimes you just have to start a fire, cauterize a wound, start a distraction, etc
Trauma Kit - Duct Tape, Gauze, TQ, Bacitracin so you don't bleed out if wounded
Leather Gloves w/wool inserts - Gloves just come in handy, no pun intended
Small Power Cell - Extra juice for the phone
Compass & Map - I know my area, but these are always good to have, low weight & size

Winter Addon - Small synthetic fleece for another layer of warmth

I have a pair of hiking boots in my office too.
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Old 02-13-2017, 09:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by souldier66 View Post
My GHB doubles as my EDC, it's pretty small and weights around 10 lbs (not counting my work laptop). Basically it's built to get my from center city philly to my home in the burbs.

Pistol and extra mag - I work in the city, getting home might get hairy
Leatherman - Having this tool is just common sense for the size and weight
Silcock Key - Route is through city/residential area so this tool gets me access to water
Small Flashlight - Who knows when it happens, maybe I'm working late, or the power goes out in my building.
Light Raincoat - Because getting wet sucks
Prana Pants - Not really needed, but my bag has the room
Base Layers - Because being cold sucks
Extra Wool Socks - Your feet might get wet, you will need a backup
Trail Runners - Walking home in dress shoes is doable, but rather not
Water Bladder - So I can stay hydrated
Iodine Crystals - Not really needed in the city, but worth the size and weight
Lighter - Sometimes you just have to start a fire, cauterize a wound, start a distraction, etc
Trauma Kit - Duct Tape, Gauze, TQ, Bacitracin so you don't bleed out if wounded
Leather Gloves w/wool inserts - Gloves just come in handy, no pun intended
Small Power Cell - Extra juice for the phone
Compass & Map - I know my area, but these are always good to have, low weight & size

Winter Addon - Small synthetic fleece for another layer of warmth

I have a pair of hiking boots in my office too.


Soldier66 this is very similar to what I've been thinking. I think the one advantage I have is that I can keep some of this in my vehicle. Which would help me keep the actual pack size and weight down. Do you mind sharing what bag you are using?


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Old 02-13-2017, 09:24 AM
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Sure, I use a tactical tailor operator pack, it's around 1200 cubic inches if I remember correctly and with everything in it the bag is pretty much full.

The shoes are the bulkiest item in the bag and while I could probably just keep them in the office that won't help me if I'm on the train and it breaks down.
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Old 02-13-2017, 09:45 AM
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"What are some of the reasons you selected gear for your bag?"

My "GHB" is my work laptop bag, thus the stuff I have in it is all office-friendly. I don't think there is one specific "survival" item in it. It's all stuff that has actual everyday use. And it's all stuff that could assist someone in an odd outlier situation. I have a small bag of stuff in my vehicle if I need to toss something more specific in the bag, but I don't carry that stuff everywhere. No really need to.

I could type up a gear listing with a "why" beside each item, but everyone has different lives and different needs. And I think most posted lists are for vanity and are way too large for anything reasonable for myself.

"EDC" / "GHB"... for most professionals it depends on their office environment and commute. Justification isn't required.
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Old 02-16-2017, 05:13 PM
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Justify what you NEED not what you want. Youll be walking, so the heavier the pack the slower and more tired you will be and it will take you longer to get home. It should be built on weather, terrain and distance. IMHO if you live less than 20 miles from home you almost don't need one but its still not a bad idea. My GHB for my 10 mile trek to work also goes with me when I go into the city.

Main stuff I keep in it is as follows:

-Glock 43 with spare mag
-multitool
-headlamp
-granola bars
-lighter
-med kit(bandaids, antibiotic, TQ, chapstick, tweezers, moleskin, alcohol preps etc...nothing crazy)
-water bottle
-jacket
-small pair of binos
-beanie or baseball cap depending on year. Also gloves if its winter
-map of the city
-rite in rain notepad and pens and sharpie
-couple of Silver Eagles and some cash
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Old 02-16-2017, 06:03 PM
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I noticed most (not all) of you guys forgot to put something in your GHB...

TOILET PAPER!

Nobody likes the alternative.
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Old 02-16-2017, 06:47 PM
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I noticed most (not all) of you guys forgot to put something in your GHB...

TOILET PAPER!

Nobody likes the alternative.
That's why you keep a pack of wet wipes in the IFAK!
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Old 02-16-2017, 08:08 PM
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I don't like wet on my bum

(Especially if it's freezing out!)
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