How do you justify the contents of your GHB? - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Disaster Preparedness General Discussion Anything Disaster Preparedness or Survival Related

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
GHB: The Winter Package merlinfire Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 64 11-08-2017 04:04 PM
Opinions on my BOB/ INCH bag contents 88horizon5speed Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 60 12-12-2016 09:36 AM
Add a hacksaw blade to your GHB farmboyJD Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 20 12-06-2016 09:06 PM
GHB Drink Mix Mark S Food and water 11 11-12-2016 04:02 PM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-11-2017, 01:26 PM
StayFrosty StayFrosty is offline
Bourbon Slayer
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: PNW
Posts: 155
Thanks: 552
Thanked 234 Times in 84 Posts
Default How do you justify the contents of your GHB?



Advertise Here

Happy Saturday Friends -

I was at Cabelas last night and picked up a Red Rock pack. Nothing fancy just something I wanted to throw in my truck to have some basic get home supplies. I work no more than 10 miles from home and generally never travel more than 20 miles away from home.

My thoughts around this pack was a light weight GHB. As I start looking at threads where others make suggestions for their GHB's I started wondering if I am looking at the usefulness of my bag. This is I am sure a very personal view of what should go into a GHB.

From your perspective as you think about what you have in your GHB. What are some of the reasons you selected gear for your bag? For example. I see a lot of people who suggest putting the mylar survival blanket in a GHB. Would you find it justifiable to put that in a bag such as mine? What criteria did you use to select it? 550 cord is often something that is added but what value would it offer?

I am hopeful your responses will help me and others to apply some reasoning into their bags and not try to throw the kitchen sink into the bag.

Thanks and StayFrosty.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to StayFrosty For This Useful Post:
Old 02-11-2017, 02:20 PM
Justme11's Avatar
Justme11 Justme11 is online now
French Prometheus unbound
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Houston
Posts: 28,218
Thanks: 31,248
Thanked 67,792 Times in 20,722 Posts
Default

For 10 miles, I would just pack a pair of Speedos and some running shoes.

but for longer distances, imagine scenarios that are possible and prepare as you wish.
Train wreck spewing toxic gas, respirator and goggles might be nice.
Skeeters and flies around? DEET and Head net
Riots? Self defense options as permitted by law.
Cold? Wind? rain? Poncho, Bivvy, tarp, rain suit would be nice.
Always have fire, water and some snacks. Water purification equipment for long walks. lighter, big knife or small hatchet. canteen cup and some coffee.
Compass and map to navigate.
Cell charger.
Do you travel in clothing for dress rather than weather? then maybe need some good boots, gloves, tougher pants and shirt.

Think you might get hurt, heat exhausted, tired? SWAT tournequet, a few bandages, caffeine pills, rehydrating salts.

Need a date? Duct tape, paracord. (kidding).
Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2017, 02:28 PM
Hick Industries's Avatar
Hick Industries Hick Industries is offline
Live Secret, Live Happy
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Eastern Oklahoma
Posts: 14,320
Thanks: 17,777
Thanked 34,955 Times in 9,784 Posts
Default

I keep the stuff I want to walk home for 2-3 days, packed in my Jeep.

A old pair of hiking boots, a warm jacket, 2 liters of water in a hydration bag, two MREs, a military poncho, and a poncho liner. Beyond that, I carry a knife, a multi tool, flashlight, and some first aid items.

I carry a handgun, cell phone, and a tactical folding knife on my person.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Hick Industries For This Useful Post:
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-11-2017, 02:51 PM
40cal's Avatar
40cal 40cal is offline
Somewhere on a ranch...
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: The greatest country in the world... Texas
Posts: 1,944
Thanks: 1,834
Thanked 5,114 Times in 1,411 Posts
Default

My travel is very similar to yours - I work less than 20 miles from home.

That being said, my philosophy is to pack enough to get me home if I was a three day's walk away.

The reason is that it is possible I'm further from home. It's also possible I might have other people with me. Three days of supplies for me is one day of supplies for three people.

If I know I'm traveling outside of that range, I'll add to my bag. If I'm traveling with others for a significant distance, you can add a second GHB to your vehicle with another three day's supplies. Doing this allows you to split the load with someone else so one person isn't lugging 50 pounds around!

Not to get off topic, but to continue along this train of thought - if vacationing, I could be 400 miles away. That is a completely different ballgame, and I usually pack more self-sustaining items like filters instead of bottled water. The mindset is different - it's like a cross-country hike. In that case, you need a bag for each person that they can travel for weeks with.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to 40cal For This Useful Post:
Old 02-11-2017, 03:01 PM
jayclimber's Avatar
jayclimber jayclimber is offline
Sheepdog
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Ohio
Posts: 668
Thanks: 3,832
Thanked 2,654 Times in 606 Posts
Default

Always think of the 10 essentials:

1. Water
2. Food
3. Firestarter w/tinder
4. Warm/dry clothes
5. Pocket knife/multitool
6. Map/compass
7. First aid
8. Shelter
9. Paracord 50 ft
10. Headlamp/flashlight

Your GHB can be as simple as a sling bag or a larger daypack depending on your AO, the distance needed to travel, and time of year. Consider what you may need/want for your unexpected journey.

*Water to drink so that you stave of dehydration and replace fluids lost while making the several mile walk!
*Food, a couple of energy/granola bars if you only have a few miles to go but maybe extra rations if your walk will take longer. Always plan for a worst case scenario!
*Firestarter. What if your journey starts late in the day and you have to hunker down for the night? Would be nice to keep the cold away, maybe for a morale booster, or for signaling!
*Warm and dry clothes, this can be a sweater or rain jacket! The weather isn't always going to cooperate when you need it too, be prepared for the unexpected. This may change depending on the time of year and your AO.
*Pocket knife or multitool. Countless uses!
*Map and compass! You need to know where you are going! What if there is a roadblock, a large group of protestors, a natural disaster that has you normal route blocked... You need to know where you are going and how to get there!
*First aid kit! From minor boo-boos to insect bites, maybe a sprained ankle, headache from angry snowflakes yelling at you as you walk by, etc... Or maybe even worse, you need to be able to take care of your immediate needs!
*Shelter! This can be a simple mylar blanket or survival tarp! Use it to put a temporary roof over your head or to wrap up in to get through a cold night!
*Paracord! Hundreds of uses! Rigging up your survival tarp, replacement boot laces, tying a splint up, makeshift belt, fixing a broken pack strap, etc... 50 feet will suit just about any need!
*Headlamp/flashlight! What if you need to travel at night during a power outage? You need to be able to see where you are going or who is coming towards you! Plus for signaling law enforcement for help! You never know...

Last I would definitely include your concealed carry sidearm (where legal of course) During a time of crisis, anyone and everyone is to be looked at as a possible foe. You want to be able to make it home to your family, so you had better be prepared!

Hope this was some of the advice you were looking for!
Quick reply to this message
The Following 13 Users Say Thank You to jayclimber For This Useful Post:
Old 02-11-2017, 03:34 PM
Just Jeff's Avatar
Just Jeff Just Jeff is offline
Stop YOLOing
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,749
Thanks: 10,071
Thanked 7,433 Times in 2,079 Posts
Default

Pack like you're going camping for 2-3 days, and you'll have everything you need. Then figure out if there are a few extras that would be good for this specific purpose. Don't forget to add a pair of old boots or shoes that you can walk a long way in, just in case you're wearing dress shoes or flip flops when <insert situation here> happens.

One thing I add is a silcock key. This will let me open faucets that have the handle removed.

Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2017-02-11 at 3.32.49 PM.png
Views:	56
Size:	402.2 KB
ID:	188801

https://www.amazon.com/Cobra-Product...dp/B0002YVMEM/

And a more hefty first aid kit than what I use when backpacking.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Just Jeff For This Useful Post:
Old 02-11-2017, 03:49 PM
StayFrosty StayFrosty is offline
Bourbon Slayer
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: PNW
Posts: 155
Thanks: 552
Thanked 234 Times in 84 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jayclimber View Post
Always think of the 10 essentials:

1. Water
2. Food
3. Firestarter w/tinder
4. Warm/dry clothes
5. Pocket knife/multitool
6. Map/compass
7. First aid
8. Shelter
9. Paracord 50 ft
10. Headlamp/flashlight

Your GHB can be as simple as a sling bag or a larger daypack depending on your AO, the distance needed to travel, and time of year. Consider what you may need/want for your unexpected journey.

*Water to drink so that you stave of dehydration and replace fluids lost while making the several mile walk!
*Food, a couple of energy/granola bars if you only have a few miles to go but maybe extra rations if your walk will take longer. Always plan for a worst case scenario!
*Firestarter. What if your journey starts late in the day and you have to hunker down for the night? Would be nice to keep the cold away, maybe for a morale booster, or for signaling!
*Warm and dry clothes, this can be a sweater or rain jacket! The weather isn't always going to cooperate when you need it too, be prepared for the unexpected. This may change depending on the time of year and your AO.
*Pocket knife or multitool. Countless uses!
*Map and compass! You need to know where you are going! What if there is a roadblock, a large group of protestors, a natural disaster that has you normal route blocked... You need to know where you are going and how to get there!
*First aid kit! From minor boo-boos to insect bites, maybe a sprained ankle, headache from angry snowflakes yelling at you as you walk by, etc... Or maybe even worse, you need to be able to take care of your immediate needs!
*Shelter! This can be a simple mylar blanket or survival tarp! Use it to put a temporary roof over your head or to wrap up in to get through a cold night!
*Paracord! Hundreds of uses! Rigging up your survival tarp, replacement boot laces, tying a splint up, makeshift belt, fixing a broken pack strap, etc... 50 feet will suit just about any need!
*Headlamp/flashlight! What if you need to travel at night during a power outage? You need to be able to see where you are going or who is coming towards you! Plus for signaling law enforcement for help! You never know...

Last I would definitely include your concealed carry sidearm (where legal of course) During a time of crisis, anyone and everyone is to be looked at as a possible foe. You want to be able to make it home to your family, so you had better be prepared!

Hope this was some of the advice you were looking for!
Your post was helpful and has me thinking about a few things you mention. You have map & compass. Not that they are big items by any means. Would you carry them even if you are familiar with the town you live in? Again my travel from home to work / home to local stores etc wouldn't normally require me to carry a map or compass.

I think in my mind I am torn. 90% of my time I think the bag with essentials would be fine. Maybe where I am struggling is that I don't typically travel to areas I am not familiar with or feel I would need to stay overnight. I'm now thinking I need to come up with a base kit and have add on kits in the truck. Then again as I think of that then I think why not just have it all in one kit. LOL. Damn my thinking. Maybe it isn't rationalizing the kit?

Thank you Jayclimber!
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to StayFrosty For This Useful Post:
Old 02-11-2017, 03:51 PM
Borrowed time Borrowed time is offline
I love this forum
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Age: 50
Posts: 3,000
Thanks: 6,602
Thanked 6,289 Times in 1,958 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Jeff View Post
One thing I add is a silcock key. This will let me open faucets that have the handle removed.

Attachment 188801

https://www.amazon.com/Cobra-Product...dp/B0002YVMEM/
Plus 1 on the silcock key! i bought one 2 years ago or less due to it being mentioned here. Took the family camping last summer up in the mountains. didnt fill the water container cause we were going to a place with plenty of water. got there & it was full. looked for a camp to stay, landed at a free one but it had no water. Looked all over the area, didnt want to buy too much bottled water, just enough for night & morning. next day went into town. local grocery/gas store had a faucet outside but didnt have the key to open. i pulled it out & he said take what you need as long as you got the key. saved us from an expensive water supply purchase for the trip!
Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2017, 04:03 PM
Borrowed time Borrowed time is offline
I love this forum
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Age: 50
Posts: 3,000
Thanks: 6,602
Thanked 6,289 Times in 1,958 Posts
Default

My bag is full of tools to make what i need, scrounge what i need or E & E back home with some few "life support" items.

TOOLS
Knives
leatherman with bit kit
silcock key
Gerber Milspec Concertina wire Cutters (to E&E thru fences/barbed wire)
folding saw
zip ties
paracord

LIFE SUPPORT
Fire building kit - at least 3 ways plus lighter fluid
Saywer filter
poncho & liner
cooking gear
FAK (beyond the boo-boo kit)

FOOD PROCUREMENT
fishing kit (small take-down rod/reel, speed hooks/yo-yo reels, powerbait etc)
snares
Pistol/Ammo
wild food recognition pamphlet

SECURITY
10X40 Monocular to make sure the way is clear
again, pistol/ammo
fishing line to use with soda cans/rocks if alarm needed

This isnt the full list, but it covers the essentials. My BOB & INCH bags are far larger & more complete.
Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2017, 04:22 PM
Woodswalker Woodswalker is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: MA.
Posts: 4,086
Thanks: 8,275
Thanked 10,109 Times in 2,682 Posts
Default

My usual distance to get home is about 7 miles . For that distance I don't need much other than what I already have on me - my edc
Water some energy snacks and a rain poncho is really all that's necessary for a 7 mile get home . I could survive without a ghb for that distance but I do always have a ghb in my truck .
My ghb is geared for the possibility of it taking a few days to get home but also keeping gear and weight to a minimum .

In my ghb ;
Food (various freeze dried foods/snacks , tea + coffee bags , honey packets) , water , canteen + cup , esbit and Trangia stove , compass , fire starters/tinder , first aid kit , mini sawyer filter , some paracord , Mora knife with fire steel , TP , hand sanitizer , moist wipes , spork , bandana , fishing line and hooks
For shelter - large trash bag , plastic painters tarp , military style poncho , heavy duty space blanket and fleece blanket . A wool blanket would be better but weight is a concern .
Anything extra that I might need is in my truck and could be added depending on the circumstances and time of year .
Quick reply to this message
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Woodswalker For This Useful Post:
Old 02-11-2017, 06:10 PM
jayclimber's Avatar
jayclimber jayclimber is offline
Sheepdog
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Ohio
Posts: 668
Thanks: 3,832
Thanked 2,654 Times in 606 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by StayFrosty View Post
Your post was helpful and has me thinking about a few things you mention. You have map & compass. Not that they are big items by any means. Would you carry them even if you are familiar with the town you live in? Again my travel from home to work / home to local stores etc wouldn't normally require me to carry a map or compass.
My though with the map and compass it that I have many alternative routes marked as well as having info readily available in case I need to get off the beaten path and head into the woods or river valley to take the long way home!

Quote:
Originally Posted by StayFrosty View Post
I think in my mind I am torn. 90% of my time I think the bag with essentials would be fine. Maybe where I am struggling is that I don't typically travel to areas I am not familiar with or feel I would need to stay overnight. I'm now thinking I need to come up with a base kit and have add on kits in the truck. Then again as I think of that then I think why not just have it all in one kit. LOL. Damn my thinking. Maybe it isn't rationalizing the kit?

Thank you Jayclimber!
Better to have it and not need it, than to need it and wished you had it!

What if that bridge you have to cross to get home is barricaded off by police or National Guard? The only other way home is a detour that takes you through an unfamiliar side of town or into the river valley or farm land that you haven't been through and it starts to get dark. You hear a lot of sirens in the distance and aren't sure what to do next. Be prepared my friend!



Sent from my SM-G360T using Tapatalk
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to jayclimber For This Useful Post:
Old 02-11-2017, 06:39 PM
JabbaNoBother's Avatar
JabbaNoBother JabbaNoBother is offline
EdgeCrusher
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
Posts: 727
Thanks: 548
Thanked 870 Times in 387 Posts
Default

Because you never know

Click image for larger version

Name:	EN_0129_Strassmann_640x360.jpg
Views:	113
Size:	55.8 KB
ID:	188825
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to JabbaNoBother For This Useful Post:
Old 02-11-2017, 06:54 PM
Writer's Block Writer's Block is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Victoria BC, Canada.
Posts: 6,874
Thanks: 10,901
Thanked 8,971 Times in 3,817 Posts
Default

You justify the contents of a GHB with the plan. What ever route or routes you may take, to get home for where ever you have good odds of being when SHTF, will tell you the time, conditions, special terrain, and odds of conflict as well as every other element of the plan to safely reach home from there.

The needs, based on those elements, you will have must be met in order to successfully return home.

Those needs must be provided for or aided by the pack and its contents in order to assist you in succeeding.

Each person is going to have some common things to their GHB, but there is going to be some particular to the specific terrain and conditions you will have that need to be thought about and addressed by you.



Also, I am curious... I use several different Red Rock packs myself, including for my own GHB I take to work. Which specific one did you get?

You can see one I turned into an "Urban BOB" in this thread; it might give you some ideas (NOT a GHB, but some similar concerns):

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...=388111&page=3
Quick reply to this message
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Writer's Block For This Useful Post:
Old 02-11-2017, 08:39 PM
Jerry D Young's Avatar
Jerry D Young Jerry D Young is offline
www.jerrydyoung.com

 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Reno, NV
Age: 66
Posts: 12,059
Thanks: 15,103
Thanked 62,609 Times in 8,963 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Thread 
Total Awards: 1
Default

I justify what is in my GHB by considering worst case scenarios.

In the OP's particular case, you are ten miles from home. But if you cannot get home the ten mile route. You have to go forty miles the other way, head for another route, and circle back around. One hundred miles. On foot. With only the GHB. What if you are injured in whatever caused the need to head for home? Or your loved ones are not at home but have been evacuated to a different location fifty miles away? Or travel restrictions are put in place with harsh penalties for breaking them and you have to delay for 24 to 72 hours or so?

The 'normal' or the 'easy' route simply might not be the route you have to take. Or other things can happen. As been said, better to have than not have, and my own 'I want options'.

Just my opini
on.
__________________
Jerry D Young
Quick reply to this message
The Following 12 Users Say Thank You to Jerry D Young For This Useful Post:
Old 02-12-2017, 12:18 AM
StayFrosty StayFrosty is offline
Bourbon Slayer
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: PNW
Posts: 155
Thanks: 552
Thanked 234 Times in 84 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Writer's Block View Post
You justify the contents of a GHB with the plan. What ever route or routes you may take, to get home for where ever you have good odds of being when SHTF, will tell you the time, conditions, special terrain, and odds of conflict as well as every other element of the plan to safely reach home from there.

The needs, based on those elements, you will have must be met in order to successfully return home.

Those needs must be provided for or aided by the pack and its contents in order to assist you in succeeding.

Each person is going to have some common things to their GHB, but there is going to be some particular to the specific terrain and conditions you will have that need to be thought about and addressed by you.



Also, I am curious... I use several different Red Rock packs myself, including for my own GHB I take to work. Which specific one did you get?

You can see one I turned into an "Urban BOB" in this thread; it might give you some ideas (NOT a GHB, but some similar concerns):

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...=388111&page=3
That's the bag I found. $35. Although today I purchased a water bladder for $28 so I don't know how much of a deal it actually was. I did manage to pickup a leatherman from the local pawn shop to include with it for $20. I was also able to get a headlamp that was sent to me via a box thing my son got me for a birthday. So it is quickly coming together. Looking for medkit.

thanks for the replies. You don't know how helpful it has been!
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to StayFrosty For This Useful Post:
Old 02-12-2017, 02:48 AM
fci1998 fci1998 is offline
BOHICA
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: North Central Florida
Posts: 471
Thanks: 3,285
Thanked 473 Times in 268 Posts
Default

I always plan for worst case scenario. Even where I live in North Florida, it can be 70s during the day and down to the 20s at night during winter. Summer can be bright and sunny mid 90s down to freezing thunderstorms.

So my GHB has many items. My heaviest items are boots and shoes.
Also extra socks, get caught in a rainstorm and get saturated, your feet will not like you, especially if you aren't used to walking. 7 miles for some is a breeze some others It's killer. The thing about having shoes or boots. You can leave what ever in your vehicle/work that you don't need Gives you a choice. Like many items people mentioned before are just basic. TP and Army/Military parka!!!! The parka has a snorkel hood which allows you to build a small fire to cook/warmth. I have the very thin type material thermal underwear that I use as a replacement for a sleeping bag in conjunction with a thermal blanket. My get home is very close to my bugout and changes by the seasons.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to fci1998 For This Useful Post:
Old 02-12-2017, 06:45 AM
Carlos Murphy Carlos Murphy is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Gardnerville, Nv.
Posts: 605
Thanks: 4
Thanked 622 Times in 307 Posts
Default Cabela's

Quote:
Originally Posted by StayFrosty View Post
Happy Saturday Friends -

I was at Cabelas last night and picked up a Red Rock pack. Nothing fancy just something I wanted to throw in my truck to have some basic get home supplies. I work no more than 10 miles from home and generally never travel more than 20 miles away from home.

My thoughts around this pack was a light weight GHB. As I start looking at threads where others make suggestions for their GHB's I started wondering if I am looking at the usefulness of my bag. This is I am sure a very personal view of what should go into a GHB.

From your perspective as you think about what you have in your GHB. What are some of the reasons you selected gear for your bag? For example. I see a lot of people who suggest putting the mylar survival blanket in a GHB. Would you find it justifiable to put that in a bag such as mine? What criteria did you use to select it? 550 cord is often something that is added but what value would it offer?

I am hopeful your responses will help me and others to apply some reasoning into their bags and not try to throw the kitchen sink into the bag.

Thanks and StayFrosty.
Speaking of Cabela's, their having a sale on the Taurus PT111 Millennium Pro G2 9mm hand guns, $249.99, I paid 100 bucks more local purchase last year, great carry gun.
Check them out on youtube, hickok45
Quick reply to this message
Old 02-12-2017, 09:34 AM
ReadyAPR ReadyAPR is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Colorado
Posts: 45
Thanks: 6
Thanked 74 Times in 27 Posts
Default

OCD

Really, my GHB is overpacked. My truck is overpacked as well. The reason I have for it is, at least it is with me at the start. I can always dump stuff as needed or give away as needed. I may stay with my truck for a bit and "work from it".
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to ReadyAPR For This Useful Post:
Old 02-12-2017, 10:30 AM
ROCK6's Avatar
ROCK6 ROCK6 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Georgia/Virginia
Posts: 5,736
Thanks: 6,540
Thanked 13,007 Times in 4,227 Posts
Default

Somebody already mentioned that straight-line road distance may not be applicable. Having lived in the PNW, some areas around the Puget Sound can leave you 5 miles across the Sound, but 30-40 miles if you have to drive around.

You do need to build your get-home bag around your situation, location and season. But don't just think about walking home from point-A to point-B. There could be any number of situations from a complete bugout instead of trying to get home to just getting locked in at work to surviving an accident where emergency services won't make it to you in a day or two. A space blanket is pretty light and compact; however, it may be the only item to help another accident victim from getting hypothermia before an ambulance arrives. I don't necessarily mean to plan on assisting others, but the likelihood that your bug-home bag or 72-hour bag is used for other-than-catastrophic SHTF is far more likely.

ROCK6
Quick reply to this message
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to ROCK6 For This Useful Post:
Old 02-12-2017, 10:32 AM
DesertDawn DesertDawn is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Southwest US
Posts: 298
Thanks: 296
Thanked 422 Times in 184 Posts
Default

Ten miles on foot in adverse conditions could be a long walk home, so I'd be inclined to think long and light. My primary GHB weighs about 20 lbs, minus water. It does have a silcock key, small multi tool, the tent, heavier weight space blanket, 2 mylar blankets, MRE components and Datex bar, metal canteen cup and cook stand, 3 types of fire starter w/ Vaseline cotton balls and 2 tea lights (in case of wind, light one in the canteen cup to preserve other fire starters), small FAK, small katadyn water filter, Larry light and Black Diamond mini lantern, and the usual personal sanitation gear. EDC includes knife, firearm w/xtra mag, 2 oz silver, lighter and flashlight.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to DesertDawn For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net