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Old 12-10-2015, 09:43 AM
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Wasn't Snooki a Jersey cow with a bad attitude. We needed some light humor.
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Old 12-11-2015, 03:17 PM
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For years I used angus/jersey cross bulls over my heifers with good results. I bred those bulls from a couple of crazy jersey cows that I bought to milk but could never break in. Those 2 girls were crazy and quiet dangerous, but I'm confident I could have broken them in if I really needed to but I didn't need the experience.

Any way I used them to breed my heifer bulls. The bulls were probably quieter than there mums. No worse than a lot of Angus or other breeds of bull I have delt with other the years. Not what you would call quiet or calm but easy enough to handle if you gave them the due respect any bull should have.

As heifer bull they worked well in breeding small calves that were easy on the hiefers, Out of the literally hundreds of calves they sired I probably only pulled a couple. The down side was that they were pretty ordinary looking calves and didn't sell very well.

For the first time this year I used a Wagu bull over my heifers. Wagus are the Japanese breed that supposedly produce the best beef in the world but are one of the ugliest looking breed of cattle you would see. They are usually black with horns, big in the shoulder and drop right away in the rump and are narrow when looking from the front or back. Exactly the type of cattle we have been culling for the last 100yrs. But they are ment to calve really easy and the Angus Wagu cross calves are worth nearly double, by weight of a regular angus calf.

So my first lot of heifer are in calf to the Wagu bull and by this time next year I will have a bit of a idear if this experiment will work. Stay tuned for updates.
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Old 12-11-2015, 03:26 PM
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As for he Angus breed in general, In the last 20yrs or so my weaning weights have risen by nearly 100kg. Most of my calves were only around the 200 to 250kg live weight at weaning time(8 to 10ths) with the odd good calf going a bit over 300kg. Today most of my calves would average over 300kg with the better calves going about 420kgs. The only change has been genetics. I think I have done the easy genetic gains now, might be able to up those weaning weights a little through breeding but not by a lot. Time to start concentrating more on the nutrion side of the equation now.
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Old 03-01-2016, 03:52 PM
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I'm a long time reader and a new member on the board. I was born and raised on a wheat farm and cattle ranch. We run 60 cows and around 4-500 stocker steers I'm usually pretty handy at medical advice on cattle for most minor problems. Feel free to message me if you need advice on anything. Glad to find this thread!
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Old 03-01-2016, 04:02 PM
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There are several around here with quite a bit of experience. We'd love to hear about your operation and what all you have going on.



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Old 03-02-2016, 10:54 AM
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Well like I said we run around 60 black baldy cows with some angus bulls, and run around 500 stocker steers, mostly black and red angus. Usually run the steers on wheat pasture to get them up around 800lb. We also run a small scale slaughter operation that provides our family and several customers with beef.
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Old 03-02-2016, 12:41 PM
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When you say, "we", are you referring to you and your wife, or your folks and the place you grew up on?
Are you in NW Oklahoma?
Do you own the steers, run them for a feedlot, or private individual?
If you own them, do you do your own order buying?
Do you guys have a preference as to which part of the country you get steers from?
At what weight do you prefer to buy steers?
How long does it usually take to reach the 800# target weight?
How long do you keep the steers up close backgrounding them before you turn them out on wheat?

What is your opinion on the beef market outlook for this year? Oil is projected to remain low for the foreseeable future and with way the cattle market always follows oil, it doesn't look too good, yet we are facing a nationwide herd shortage due to drought in different regions which throws a whole new dynamic into the mix. With your experience, what do you project for the cow/calf producers going into the shipping season this fall?



Tex
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Old 03-02-2016, 09:54 PM
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The main problem I have is the language barrier. We all speak English, but here on the cattle thread most of you guys speak north American cow boy, were as I speak Aussie cowboy. I gotta work hard to work out what you fellas are on about sometimes, and if I typed about cattle the way I talk about cattle many of you wouldn't know what I'm saying.
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Old 03-02-2016, 10:09 PM
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What is your opinion on the beef market outlook for this year? Oil is projected to remain low for the foreseeable future and with way the cattle market always follows oil, it doesn't look too good, yet we are facing a nationwide herd shortage due to drought in different regions which throws a whole new dynamic into the mix. With your experience, what do you project for the cow/calf producers going into the shipping season this fall?



Tex
Cattle market is booming here this side of the Pacific. We were a late comer to the currant cattle market boom due to drought and political reasons I want go into. Australian market is export focused, we got more cattle than people over here, and all the signs are that high prices for us at least are her to stay at least for the short to medium term. China has entered the market in a big way and our exports are growing exponentially into that market. Female cattle are being killed at a unsustainable level over here.

Australia jostles with Brazil as the top exporting beef producer. The US is both one of our biggest markets for our exported beef (you guys take most of our low grade grinding beef for the hamburger trade) and one of our biggest competitors in the north Asia (Korea and Japan) high value export markets. The sell of of our cow herd can only be a good thing for prices to stay good in the international market for at least awhile yet. (and we all sell on the international market even if you don't realise it)
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Old 03-03-2016, 12:50 PM
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I say "we" because it is a family operation in NW OK, we own all the cattle and buy them by doing a mixture of our own buying and a order buyer. Normally we purchase cattle from Missouri at about 500lbs and we keep them in lots for 2 weeks or so after we run them through and castrate, vaccinate for BRD/Blackleg, and give antibiotics to any calf showing symptoms. At the end of those 2 weeks if everyone looks health eye kick them out onto the wheat where they usually gain 3-4lbs a day if the wheat is good. As for the cattle market I've spent my whole life trying to figure it out and your guess is as good as mine. It has as much to do with what the futures commentators say as to what is actually happening in the real world.
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Old 03-14-2016, 12:56 PM
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Does anyone know what has happened with the OP's two calves? Did it work out for her? I can't find any newer posts

We are going to start a small farm this year and I would like some sort of milk producing animal. I don't know where to start. I have milked and fed cows as a kid but that's the only experience I have, husband has none. We have the land, but not sure what to do next.
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Old 03-14-2016, 01:07 PM
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Does anyone know what has happened with the OP's two calves? Did it work out for her? I can't find any newer posts

We are going to start a small farm this year and I would like some sort of milk producing animal. I don't know where to start. I have milked and fed cows as a kid but that's the only experience I have, husband has none. We have the land, but not sure what to do next.
Depending on how small you're talking you may want to think about milk-producing goats rather than cattle. Easier and cheaper to feed, keep and milk in general.
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Old 03-14-2016, 06:07 PM
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Depending on how small you're talking you may want to think about milk-producing goats rather than cattle. Easier and cheaper to feed, keep and milk in general.
The problems with that is taste. I have never had goat milk and have no idea what it tastes like. I have had goat cheese, but there seems to be only 1 type and it has a funny after taste. Where can you get goat milk?
Would 1 small cow give too much milk for a family to use up? ( assuming we make cheese, butter , yoghurt and feed some to the other animals)
Can you make things like cheddar out of goat milk?

Does 1 cow get lonely, or would it be ok, as long as there are other animals around?

I am not worried about feeding her, we have about 50 acres and it is currently rented to a farmer that has usually about 6 cows and their calves on it, but some of it is hayfield which he just uses for hay not pasture.
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Old 03-15-2016, 08:59 AM
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The problems with that is taste. I have never had goat milk and have no idea what it tastes like. I have had goat cheese, but there seems to be only 1 type and it has a funny after taste. Where can you get goat milk?
Would 1 small cow give too much milk for a family to use up? ( assuming we make cheese, butter , yoghurt and feed some to the other animals)
Can you make things like cheddar out of goat milk?

Does 1 cow get lonely, or would it be ok, as long as there are other animals around?

I am not worried about feeding her, we have about 50 acres and it is currently rented to a farmer that has usually about 6 cows and their calves on it, but some of it is hayfield which he just uses for hay not pasture.
With 50 acres, you'd be fine with 1-2 cows. I was thinking small farm, as in under 10 acres which might be okay for 1, depending on where you live. Cows do well with other cows, goats and horses in the same pasture...see it all the time here.

I've never had goat's milk either...but then again I dislike all milk. You should be able to buy it at any health food store.

Tex can probably give milk cow suggestions better than I but jerseys and holsteins are the best known.
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Old 03-16-2016, 09:43 AM
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I looked up some info on cows, and have found a way around not being able to sell milk ( if we have a lot extra) legally: you can sell a cow share, or you can sell it as pet food
Plus they have some miniature cows that give less milk, eat less and are easier to handle
( but I am a little concerned with them being able to give birth without problems)

But I will look for goat milk at a health food store. I looked online and only found dry goat milk at Walmart so far. Dry milk from cows is generally nasty tasting and mostly good for cooking, so I don't suppose goat milk is any different
Plus one more point against goats: we have good enough fencing for cows now, with goats, we would need to put up better fencing, plus they are smaller and easier to get attacked by some other animal
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Old 03-18-2016, 09:53 AM
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I bought a carton of goats milk from the super market once, and it tasted like a sheep smells, not to my likeing at all, but plenty of people drink it so what I tasted might have been a bad batch.

Takeing on milking a cow is a big undertakeing and not to be entered into lightly. If you can find a cow that's already broken in and nice and quiet would be a big help. I recon it would be really hard to learn how to milk and handle a cow at the same time as trying to break her in. Not imposible just hard.

Dairy breeds of cattle are really good at dying. For hundreds of years they have been bred to produce as much milk as possible at the expense of there toughness and vigour. I grew up mainly milking Friesian cows as house cows but the modern Friesian, as a rule, produces far to much milk out of small hard teats that are more suited resisting mastitis and being milked by a machine than to be milked by hand. Most comercailly milked cows want really suit as a house cow these days for the same reasons. There are still some out there that will suit, but buyer beware.

Any cow can be milked, I would choose a quiet cow, what ever her breed over a more traditional dairy breed that's wild. I milked a Herford cow once for a few months, she gave plenty of milk, enough for our needs at least, and was easy enough to milk but her milk was to creamy, so creamy that it was nearly undrinkable. I have also milked a lot of cross bred cows, half beef and half dairy breed and they often make really good house cows give enough milk for a family, at least for a few months at the start of there lactation and are a lot tougher than a straight bred dairy breed.

Another thing to look for in a prospective house cow is dark coloured teats. White teats are fare more prone to cracking than white teats. A cracked teat hurts and the cow want like you milking it and try to kick you, but a cracked teat still either needs a calf to suck it out or be milked out. If you leave the calf on the cow(which I would recommend) a calf sucking a cracked teat is harder on her than being milked by hand.
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Old 03-18-2016, 12:42 PM
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For years I used angus/jersey cross bulls over my heifers with good results. I bred those bulls from a couple of crazy jersey cows that I bought to milk but could never break in. Those 2 girls were crazy and quiet dangerous, but I'm confident I could have broken them in if I really needed to but I didn't need the experience.

Any way I used them to breed my heifer bulls. The bulls were probably quieter than there mums. No worse than a lot of Angus or other breeds of bull I have delt with other the years. Not what you would call quiet or calm but easy enough to handle if you gave them the due respect any bull should have.

As heifer bull they worked well in breeding small calves that were easy on the hiefers, Out of the literally hundreds of calves they sired I probably only pulled a couple. The down side was that they were pretty ordinary looking calves and didn't sell very well.

For the first time this year I used a Wagu bull over my heifers. Wagus are the Japanese breed that supposedly produce the best beef in the world but are one of the ugliest looking breed of cattle you would see. They are usually black with horns, big in the shoulder and drop right away in the rump and are narrow when looking from the front or back. Exactly the type of cattle we have been culling for the last 100yrs. But they are ment to calve really easy and the Angus Wagu cross calves are worth nearly double, by weight of a regular angus calf.

So my first lot of heifer are in calf to the Wagu bull and by this time next year I will have a bit of a idear if this experiment will work. Stay tuned for updates.
WHAT is a heifer bull??
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Old 03-18-2016, 12:58 PM
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WHAT is a heifer bull??
Ha ha, I caught that the first time I read it too...but forgot to comment!
I'm curious too
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Old 03-18-2016, 01:12 PM
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A "heifer bull" is a bull with low-birthweight EPDs that cattlemen use to breed to heifers so the heifers will not have as many calving problems (hopefully).
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Old 03-18-2016, 01:21 PM
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A "heifer bull" is a bull with low-birthweight EPDs that cattlemen use to breed to heifers so the heifers will not have as many calving problems (hopefully).
Makes sense, just never heard them called that....sounded strange
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