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Old 06-24-2016, 06:41 PM
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Sorry I missed out...looks like it was a reall good time. Sadly, other things get in the way :-(
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Old 06-24-2016, 06:46 PM
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Originally Posted by KHos View Post
But I think you came to a good conclusion, never take on livestock until you're 100% ready to care for them. I have a feeling you can work and get a good price on the meat as you suggested. Good luck!
Thanks for the advice.
I always try to look (sometimes more than twice) before I leap.
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Old 07-21-2016, 05:13 PM
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Keep in mind that cattle, cattle prices, cattle needs, cattle prices etc. are highly dependent and regulated by region, season and all kinds of things. Making all the preps you can, barns, sheds, pastures, winter feed, tanks, etc. before the cattle arrive will make the day to day bs headaches easier to deal with. The biggest prep a new cattle rancher can make is to first tap into the knowledge of your neighbors and find the best vet you can, which goes back to tapping into your neighbors. The next thing would be to learn every inch of your property and what it realistically can do. I can support 1 bull and 2 pairs of Scottish highland stock on my property, whereas the guy to the north of me can support 1 bull and 6 pairs on the same amount of property and the guy to the south can barely support 1 steer. I care less about popular breeds or what sells best and concentrate more on what will grow the best beef with the ground I have to work with and without neglecting the rest of the property. Remember one thing, the worst day cowboyin is still better than the best day doin anything else.
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Old 07-25-2016, 05:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Tex View Post

We even had quite a few cowgirls show up. I figured out a long time ago, if I invite a bunch of cute girls to our brandings, the cowboys will show up.


One of the cowboys dragging one in to be branded.


Two guys on the muggin' crew flipping one over.



Tex

Great pictures. But why not just head and heal them . Instead of healing and fatassing them ?

Just asking
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Old 07-25-2016, 05:52 PM
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Red Angus with some kind of Scottish cattle bred into them is what he has.
I think about 70 head (plus a few milk cows) on almost 600 acre ranch + some free ranging along the adjoining river bank area.
(Patented homestead & Taylor Grazing Act patented land)
We buy two ready to butcher 2 year old steers from him every year for cash.
Fair price & great meat.

Amazing how he does it. He uses a tape measure to take a couple measurements & calculates weight by those measurements. Then he pulls the current 100 weight price up on his phone, runs the numbers, shows me the end result, take it or leave it. 1st year we did that, I ran them over the scales & he wasn't far off. After than I have always taken his word & handshake.

Our little pasture set up was originally intended for a milk cow. But, decided the daily grind with a milk cow would be to much for our getting elderly BOL caretaker couple. Plus, without the whole family BOL group there would produce far more milk than they could use.

Given to get to optimal weight would require overwintering, I think I am going to decline his offer for a couple reasons. I would have to buy grain from the local co-op, + hay from him, + haul & store for winter feed & care/feeding might also overwhelm the caretaker couple.

For those reasons, I will probably counter offer @ $100 an hour for the backhoe time & deduct the amount due from the price of 2 ready to butcher 2 Y/O steers this fall.

He is a good guy & I don't keep a stop watch on the backhoe time or charge for the transport time either (as most locally do). + we barter a little of my DIY bottled wine & brandy to him for the use his big boar to knock up our sow every year. We also bought our milk/meat goats from him + have an agreement with him if/when some extended shtf occurs to purchase (barter gold/silver) for a milk cow & hay from him.

You might look into it think about a nurse cow. Breed her every year and buy one or two of his leppy calves . Then you can have a calf or two to eat and to sell.
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Old 10-16-2016, 08:53 PM
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I bought a new milking system for our milk cow. Used it today and Milker worked fine. The pump put out a lot of oily mist from the exhaust. Is that normal?
We had to remove the brass connections from the pump to size it for the hose to the Milker, I've read about the need for a check valve, hopefully the valve was not in the fittings. Do I need one from the pump to the milk tank? It's about 5 feet of hose. Not sure if I need to post this in another area?

Below is links to the pump and milker

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...k_ql_qh_dp_hza

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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Old 11-02-2016, 04:17 PM
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I just posted this in the farming forum before I saw this cattle thred, so I'll ask here too. We have two dexter cows, used for breeding for meat. We would like to try to tame them so we can also milk them. Right now, they let us get about a foot away, will hesitantly eat out of our hands but they run off if we touch them. Any advice on getting them used to touching to the point of being able to milk them?
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Old 11-02-2016, 04:35 PM
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Keep Feeding them and Touching them... After a while they just get USED to you. The neighbors cattle literally come running to you at the sight of a white bucket Thats what he feeds them grain out of.

Get some "sweet mix" to keep them interested in you.

Keep Feeding/"Taming" them where you will be milking them.
Go slow and keep adding "touches" (halter, rope, milking, ect) every week as you feed/ interact with them several times a day.
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Old 11-04-2016, 05:00 PM
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I just posted this in the farming forum before I saw this cattle thred, so I'll ask here too. We have two dexter cows, used for breeding for meat. We would like to try to tame them so we can also milk them. Right now, they let us get about a foot away, will hesitantly eat out of our hands but they run off if we touch them. Any advice on getting them used to touching to the point of being able to milk them?
You can just game them in a shute , grab there head tie the near side leg back and start milking. Sounds like they are already quiet so they want mind that treatment to much and it will actually make them quieter.

To quiet them down to milk without restraints, put them in a small yard and use a long stick to rub them down with so they can get used to being touched without you being to close. As they relax, hold the stick short and continue until you are close enough that you can rub them down with your hand. Take it slow.

Weight till the cow has just calved, separate the calf from the cow (after a day or 2) for a few hrs or over night so its hungry, let the calf in with the cow in a small yard. As the calf is sucking sneak in and strip some milk out. by hand. First couple of times I keep the young calf in between me and the cow, but watch the back legs, she still may try to kick, but usually only half heartedly. After a few days I can usually let the calf suck one side while I milk the other. In the early days I don't feed the cow while I'm doing all this as she tends to walk all over her feed, I feed her some hay after I have finished and separated the calf again. ( first week or 2 I keep the calf in and do the above twice a day).
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Old 11-04-2016, 08:53 PM
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Are they mulie or horned ?

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Old 11-05-2016, 08:36 AM
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Are they mulie or horned ?
Y
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Horned. And one of them likes to throw her head around too....I'm thinking we may need to get a chute in order for them to get milked.
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Old 11-05-2016, 10:22 AM
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Do you have a good stout post ? Drop a rope over her horns and tie her head to the post. Grain her there and only there and only when her head is tied. Very soon she will be standing at the post waiting for you

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Old 11-11-2016, 07:18 PM
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Old 04-14-2017, 08:01 PM
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What are the cattle prices like in your part of the world. Here in Australia cattle prices are at all time high. Sold my weaner stears last week for a top of $1270 ea or about 420c/kg (Australian Dollars = about 75cent US) My rough calculations would make that about $950us ea or about 150cUS/ pound Australian farm gate cattle prices have always been about the lowest in the western world but we have never seen prices any were near this high. How we doing here in OZ, we still getting ripped off? Are cattle going up or down in other places in the world.

If your not concerned about Australian cattle prices or world wide cattle prices you should be. Australia and the US have a free trade agreement and Australia is about the biggest beef exporter in the world, (changes from year to year with Australia, Brazil and strangly enouth India viaing for top beef exporter). Cheap cattle in Australia will force prices down in America. Infact the reason we are finally getting good prices is largly because of trade deals with US, China, Japan etc.
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Old 04-15-2017, 09:23 AM
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Not as good as they were a few years ago when I was forced to sell mine. I was actually very lucky that I had to sell when I did...I got good money for them. Prices are lower now but since I'm not running cattle any more I haven't watched the prices as closely
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Old 05-29-2017, 12:27 PM
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Calves a looking good this year

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Old 06-12-2017, 07:03 PM
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Horned. And one of them likes to throw her head around too....I'm thinking we may need to get a chute in order for them to get milked.


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Old 07-18-2018, 08:48 PM
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I am thinking about cross fencing my place and am looking at MINI- BREEDS OF CATTLE reason being some of them are not much bigger than very large goats and maybe even crossbreeding them some the ones I like are Dexter , Scottish Highland , ZEBU , low line Angus , Hereford and Belted Galloway. I may try and find a dairy farm that uses Jerseys I know a lot of them breed their first calf heifers to small Angus bulls and Bottle raise some heifer calves. My reason being is smaller cattle do less damage to the land and from what I have read these breeds are great foragers and do well as grass fed beef. And in a SHTF butchering a weaned calf would have less waste in warm months. And each of these breeds bring something unique to the table as well. Just something I am thinking about. I like goat meat , lamb as well has chicken , but i really like beef.
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Old 07-18-2018, 08:56 PM
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Originally Posted by TENNGRIZZ View Post
I am thinking about cross fencing my place and am looking at MINI- BREEDS OF CATTLE reason being some of them are not much bigger than very large goats and maybe even crossbreeding them some the ones I like are Dexter , Scottish Highland , ZEBU , low line Angus , Hereford and Belted Galloway. I may try and find a dairy farm that uses Jerseys I know a lot of them breed their first calf heifers to small Angus bulls and Bottle raise some heifer calves. My reason being is smaller cattle do less damage to the land and from what I have read these breeds are great foragers and do well as grass fed beef. And in a SHTF butchering a weaned calf would have less waste in warm months. And each of these breeds bring something unique to the table as well. Just something I am thinking about. I like goat meat , lamb as well has chicken , but i really like beef.
I can attest that the Dexter's are very easy to handle. You can milk them, eat them, and if shtf use them as oxen. You can easily breed up or down in size with the Dexter's. Which makes it nice, if your wanting bigger or smaller just pick your bull.

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Old 07-18-2018, 09:09 PM
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It's been years since I started this thread, and I still love our Dexters even though they are bigger than goats. Grass fed Dexter beef is excellent, better than any beef I've ever bought from the store. One sacrificed animal lasts a very long time. They are very mild mannered for the most part. Castration of a bull calf proved difficult, mostly trying to catch him. After he was caught he was ok to deal with, and we're newbs still.

Try to get them without horns or they may learn to wreak havoc on a fence.
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