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Old 09-12-2013, 08:33 PM
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Old birds have a richer flavor?
Absolutely. None of the explanations "why" are very convincing, but I've found that an old rooster makes much richer broth than a younger bird. I suppose the same connective tissue, etc, that makes him tougher makes him richer -- kind of the way tenderloin is tender, but smooth, and chuck roast is tough,but flavorful.

I've read that some expensive chefs go to a lot of effort to source old roosters for coq au vin, as that's what the dish was designed for.

Which reminds me -- always take the time to clean the feet and throw them in the stock pot. There's lot of gelatin, collagen and magic in them.
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:39 PM
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Absolutely. None of the explanations "why" are very convincing, but I've found that an old rooster makes much richer broth than a younger bird. I suppose the same connective tissue, etc, that makes him tougher makes him richer -- kind of the way tenderloin is tender, but smooth, and chuck roast is tough,but flavorful.

I've read that some expensive chefs go to a lot of effort to source old roosters for coq au vin, as that's what the dish was designed for.

Which reminds me -- always take the time to clean the feet and throw them in the stock pot. There's lot of gelatin, collagen and magic in them.
I tasted the broth before I canned it. It was quite yummy.

I ought to leave the feet in the soup when I can it; just as a joke. LOL
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:42 PM
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Years ago my Mom told me when she was a kid their were some neighborhood Mexican kids who when their Mom processed a chicken would cook the feet and give it to them. They would walk around chewing on them. LOL
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:53 PM
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I can't get past the part where they walk around and step in their own poop...ewww on the chicken feet.
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Old 09-12-2013, 11:54 PM
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I can't get past the part where they walk around and step in their own poop...ewww on the chicken feet.
Well;eggs come out of their butt.

Just seeing the feet in the soup would gross me out. It isn't the dirtiness; just something about it. LOL

Hey maybe that would be a trick to gross out raiders. Can a few with beaks and feet and put them in the front.LOL
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Old 09-13-2013, 06:47 AM
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Years ago my Mom told me when she was a kid their were some neighborhood Mexican kids who when their Mom processed a chicken would cook the feet and give it to them. They would walk around chewing on them. LOL
I've seen them served in dim sum restaurants. Not for me -- they make me think of monkey paws. But my CHinese friends seemed to think they were yummy.

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I can't get past the part where they walk around and step in their own poop...ewww on the chicken feet.
There's a tough outer membrane that you peel off, then what's left is nice clean chicken skin.

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Well;eggs come out of their butt.

Just seeing the feet in the soup would gross me out. It isn't the dirtiness; just something about it. LOL
Well, you do strain them out...

Processing chickens might be a good object lesson for the future. In the US, we've had two or three generations who could afford to be squeamish and wasteful about food. I think we're looking at the end of that period.
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Old 09-13-2013, 07:41 AM
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<snip>
Processing chickens might be a good object lesson for the future. In the US, we've had two or three generations who could afford to be squeamish and wasteful about food. I think we're looking at the end of that period.
I agree. When I process birds I waste NOTHING. After I fillet the breasts off and cut off the wings and leg quarters, what's left goes into a pot to simmer for 45 minutes to an hour. We remove the carcass and pick off all remaining meat, that gets canned in half pints. We use the broth to cover any other chicken we're canning that day and then can the remaining broth for use in other dishes.

When I'm done there's nothing left but bones.....
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Old 09-13-2013, 08:03 AM
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I am new to processing home raised chickens.

We butchered a year old rooster (Mr. Rooster), last summer then froze him. He had rigor mortise. His legs stuck straight out. I left him in the fridge for several days hoping that would go away but it didn't. I didn't want to leave him longer to spoil. You should have seen me trying to wrap this bird in Saran wrap. LOL

Now I have cut up store bought chickens for many years now but, never a year old rooster.

That is the toughest meat I have ever seen. I cut him up raw and that was a job in itself. I even cut my thumb on a bone wrestling with it.

Then I put the pieces in a pot of water salted and boiled for 15 minutes. I then removed the pieces to cool so I could de-bone the meat and make soup to can. I planned on cooking the deboned meat longer and add spices, veggies and stuff. I could not even get the meat off the bone and frustrated I put all the pieces back in the pot to deal w/ tomorrow because it is late.

For experienced chicken people out there; what is the best way to go about this? Do I boil it till tender then debone it? Would pressure cooking it make it happen quicker and easier or should I crock pot it till tender?

What do you do to process a tough ole rooster for canning.
Don't know about canning, although I would imagine it would be similar, but we always boiled hens up in a pot with a good splash of vinegar 'to suck the flavour out of the bones' - Mum.

Salt inhibits this (mum again) and gets added after the simmering process of approx 2 hrs when the pot is emptied into a bowl through a colander, chicken is picked off and returned to the stock. That's when we'd add the onions and so forth. I imagine you could get the meat off after an hour but for a tough animal I'd let it go the full 2 hrs. So much goodies you get out of the bones, all the gristle dissolves, it's a beautiful thing.

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Old 09-13-2013, 08:11 AM
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Others have given their advice about cooking. But for future reference, 1 year old roosters will always be tough. Roosters, if not used for breeding purposes, should be killed at 6 months. Now, olders hens you can eat, but you have to cook them longer, like for soup, dumpling, or roast them.
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Old 09-13-2013, 01:53 PM
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Others have given their advice about cooking. But for future reference, 1 year old roosters will always be tough. Roosters, if not used for breeding purposes, should be killed at 6 months. Now, olders hens you can eat, but you have to cook them longer, like for soup, dumpling, or roast them.
Yeah; The only reason I was processing a tough rooster is, lat year I did not know how to tell a young rooster from a hen. LOL (I do now).

I ended up w/ 2 roosters and Mr.Rooster was unduly mean to the hens and had to go.

Now I look for the little spur buds on the legs.

I think all my chicks are roosters. They will be ready for processing in a month or so.
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Old 09-13-2013, 10:08 PM
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Well;eggs come out of their butt.
Yea, I know they come out the butt, but there is that outer shell that protects the contents inside
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Old 09-13-2013, 10:49 PM
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Years ago my Mom told me when she was a kid their were some neighborhood Mexican kids who when their Mom processed a chicken would cook the feet and give it to them. They would walk around chewing on them. LOL
Deep fried chicken feet are sold in some Filipino restaurants.
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Old 09-14-2013, 01:01 AM
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Deep fried chicken feet are sold in some Filipino restaurants.
I had a Chinese flatmate once who did the most astonishing hen's feet soup. It was fantastic.
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Old 09-14-2013, 01:07 AM
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I had a Chinese flatmate once who did the most astonishing hen's feet soup. It was fantastic.
Yep. We have alot of people from Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, and Cambodia here. You would be amazed at some of the things they eat. The fleshy skin from a Muskovy ducks face is considered a treat.

One of my friends sent me some dried Ube. Another friend who lives here had his wife to make Ube cake and pies with it. Purple cake and purple pies. Looked strange but tasted delicious.

Edit: Probably didnt taste as good as fresh Ube, though.
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Old 09-14-2013, 01:14 AM
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Deep fried chicken feet are sold in some Filipino restaurants.
When I was in the Philippines, my soon to be wife asked me if I wanted some BBQ chicken and I readily agreed and she sent one of her many cousins to get some. As dusk was approaching we were sitting there talking when the BBQ'd chicken arrived and it was on skewers and wrapped in wax paper. About my second or third stick of chicken I start pulling it off to eat and it was more like bacon if you can imagine what bacon on a stick might be like accordion style. As I about finish off this skewer of chicken I told her that I never have had chicken like this and was in doubt that it was indeed chicken. She told me that it really was chicken and that was the intestines of the chicken!

True story......
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Old 09-14-2013, 01:18 AM
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Yep. We have alot of people from Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, and Cambodia here. You would be amazed at some of the things they eat. The fleshy skin from a Muskovy ducks face is considered a treat.

One of my friends sent me some dried Ube. Another friend who lives here had his wife to make Ube cake and pies with it. Purple cake and purple pies. Looked strange but tasted delicious.

Edit: Probably didnt taste as good as fresh Ube, though.
Like a purple sweet potato, huh? I have eaten so many unknown foods but Muscovy duck it the best eating duck hands down.
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Old 09-14-2013, 01:39 AM
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When I was in the Philippines, my soon to be wife asked me if I wanted some BBQ chicken and I readily agreed and she sent one of her many cousins to get some. As dusk was approaching we were sitting there talking when the BBQ'd chicken arrived and it was on skewers and wrapped in wax paper. About my second or third stick of chicken I start pulling it off to eat and it was more like bacon if you can imagine what bacon on a stick might be like accordion style. As I about finish off this skewer of chicken I told her that I never have had chicken like this and was in doubt that it was indeed chicken. She told me that it really was chicken and that was the intestines of the chicken!

True story......
Ive eaten fried chitlins. Very tasty.

Edit: My friend had a similar story. His wife's aunt owned a chicken restaurant on Cebu. After they were married, they went by there and she went into the kitchen. She came out with a brown paper bag that had grease stains on it. As they walked back to her parents house, she would occasionally reach into the bag, turn her head, and when he saw her face again, she was chewing. He finally asked what she was eating and at first she wouldnt answer. Finally, she told him about the chicken feet. She said she had heard that Americans didnt like eating things like that and she didnt want to "make his tummy upset". He asked for a taste, he ate some, and told her it wasnt bad. The next day, his final day there, he tried Balut. He said, once you got past the smell, it wasnt too bad with vinegar. He retired from the military and they moved there a few years ago.
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Old 09-14-2013, 01:40 AM
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Like a purple sweet potato, huh? I have eaten so many unknown foods but Muscovy duck it the best eating duck hands down.
Exactly. Ube is a "purple yam".

I agree. The "wrinkly" face is a bit chewy, though. Of course, Ive eaten dog and cat before, so things like that dont bother me.
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Old 09-14-2013, 02:26 AM
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Oh yuck!

I have a very sensitive gag reflex. If something grosses me out; has the wrong texture or what ever;it will not get past my gag reflex.

People say if you get hungry enough you'll eat anything?Not this girl.

If I had to eat duck face or chicken intestines to survive; I would starve to death.
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Old 09-14-2013, 02:29 AM
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Oh yuck!

I have a very sensitive gag reflex. If something grosses me out; has the wrong texture or what ever;it will not get past my gag reflex.

People say if you get hungry enough you'll eat anything?Not this girl.

If I had to eat duck face or chicken intestines to survive; I would starve to death.
Not me. My mother used to say, "He'll eat anything that cant outrun him".

Its actually true.
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