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Old 07-23-2019, 04:36 PM
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I didn't ask for advice, TH. I have studied a lot of nutrition and have had a hospital nutrition professional tell me she WISHED they could feed my husband as well as I was doing.

Now, if I win the lotto I will absolutely hire a houskeeper/house staff who will be schooled in what I consider to be "proper" nutrition, minimally processed, whole, fresh, foods (I think we can agree on that), things so delicious it's hard to decide which to eat. Absolutely will do that. I will eat an omelette for breakfast every morning,bursting with meats, delicious cheeses, and vegetables. I will drink organic decaf green tea and fresh squeezed lemonade.

In the meantime I am looking at a Walmart package of peeled hard boiled eggs for dinner. He ate earlier and doesn't want anything. I have a headache and don't want the turkey leg.

That's another one we can agree on, a nice smoked turkey leg.
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Old 08-26-2019, 01:15 PM
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I like salt and pepper sprinkled on a fresh picked tomato. Am I in doing it wrong?
Sea salt and pepper are fine and I enjoy spicing my tomato slices the same way. Pepper used in conjunction with turmeric has some good health benefits.
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Old 08-29-2019, 03:59 AM
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I started this on 8/12. Lost 11 lbs so far. If you are missing bread, look up chaffles. It is a new craze in the keto world. Chaffles are waffles made with egg and cheese on a mini waffle iron. There are a bazillion recipes and if you add almond flour and baking power, they turn into bread for a sandwich.
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Old 08-29-2019, 04:48 AM
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My 2 Cents:

Keto/Low Carb diets work. So do many other diet programs. But the real problem with any of them is staying to it long term. No easy solution to that.

If you want to lose weight a Keto diet is probably one of the easiest least painful (no need to go hungry) and reliable ways to do it. For a while it is even fun as you invest more time into cooking and eating new foods. But don't think it is a long term magic bullet. Eventually 99% chance you will give it up and gain again, so enjoy that skinny body while you can and be prepared for more battles ahead.

PS. My wife and I are going to start again dieting in a couple of weeks (when kids summer vacation is over). I will do low carb as it has worked for me well in the past. I don't do it for looks, but I owe it to my kids to be as healthy as possible, and to my family/work to have best possible energy levels and I can already start to feel both are in decline as my weight has been increasing again.
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Old 08-29-2019, 05:42 AM
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For me, the chaffles are a game changer. I can make sandwiches again. I am determined to make this a long term way of life. Already I have more energy and my back doesn't hurt quite as bad after work.
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Old 09-01-2019, 02:45 PM
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I got some P3 for a couple of reasons.

Vending is facing a "healthy eating" lobby that wants to dictate what we sell.
Variety
Good price point
Tasty, according to my husband (I can't eat nuts).

The other day I was stocking them and thought about how you guys could actually eat them. I didn't get them for that but I will say someone is buying them as fast as I can stock.

I also do the balanced breaks in the food machine but they have fruit in them. Still healthy, though.
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Old 01-22-2020, 05:03 PM
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I'm not going to argue with you. If you're happy then I'm happy. I'm just going to say this:

The body needs fuel to function. There are two primary fuels the body will burn. Carbs or Ketones (primarily from fats). When given a choice, the body will run to the carbs and leave the fat alone. So whatever fat you may consume on a high carb diet will get stored somewhere in your body. When carbs are removed from the body then it has to seek a new fuel source. That source is the fat stored in the body.

So the purpose of adding fat to our diet (in conjunction with intermittent fasting) will train the body to burn fat instead of carbs. When we're fasting and not introducing more fat into our system the body will start burning the body's stored fat.

And ... fat is NOT fat. There are definitely good, healthy fats and horrible fats. That's a fact!!!

Also, a good, healthy diet will help curb allergies.
Very well explained! So very simple yet so many don't even try to understand it!
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Old 01-22-2020, 05:06 PM
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I started this on 8/12. Lost 11 lbs so far. If you are missing bread, look up chaffles. It is a new craze in the keto world. Chaffles are waffles made with egg and cheese on a mini waffle iron. There are a bazillion recipes and if you add almond flour and baking power, they turn into bread for a sandwich.
Started on my wife's b-day!
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Started on my wife's b-day!



LOL. And now I'm down 52 lbs.
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Old 01-23-2020, 05:31 PM
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That is awesome, I started after Thanksgiving and dropped 20+ lbs first month alone!
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That is awesome, I started after Thanksgiving and dropped 20+ lbs first month alone!
Excellent!

Have you made chaffles yet?
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Old 01-24-2020, 07:40 AM
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I have not, though I have been thinking of trying some
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Old 01-24-2020, 07:46 AM
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Not trying argue
But in a constructive way,
Why do the experts rank Keto as the "worst diet" ???????
You can lose weight faster on other diets and long-term you are screwed.
Long term and short term, it is the worst according to the experts
I just do not get it
Why not go in the best direction for your short and long term health ?????
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Considering the "experts" have given us, heart disease, high blood pressure and an epidemic in type two diabetes, I'm not really interested in what they try to claim. The "experts" gave us the SAD, the worst possible way of eating, sold out to big business at the expense of American's health.

I don't agree long term is an issue, plenty of folks have managed for decades and our ancestors lived their lives eating that way .

The "experts" should realize it's a way of eating and not "some fad diet" , LOL
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Considering the "experts" have given us, heart disease, high blood pressure and an epidemic in type two diabetes, I'm not really interested in what they try to claim. The "experts" gave us the SAD, the worst possible way of eating, sold out to big business at the expense of American's health.

I don't agree long term is an issue, plenty of folks have managed for decades and our ancestors lived their lives eating that way .

The "experts" should realize it's a way of eating and not "some fad diet" , LOL
Why gloss-over human history with a simplistic "that is how our ancestors" lived meme ?????
So they lived 35 years. Not my goal.

What could possibly go wrong with a high fat and highly inflamatory diet ?????

I will consider the opinions of PhDs, MDs, and RDs who have concluded that both the SAD and Keto blow and keep on blowing. You think that experts from Harvard, Yale, et al want to put out nonsense ????? No, they do not. Just trying to keep it real.
Want to lose weight faster, go on a meth-diet.

"The keto diet is the worst diet for healthy eating, according to new rankings"


"Every year, US News & World Report ranks the best (and worst) diets for the year ahead. This year, the ketogenic diet was once again ranked among the worst in several categories, despite its continuing popularity...
But US News' panel of nutritionists and specialists in diabetes, heart health, and weight loss ranked keto the worst for healthy eating and the second to last overall."
https://www.insider.com/keto-diet-wo...us-news-2020-1


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I stopped reading at "high inflammatory" which told me all I needed to know.........

Also a low average age is caused by infant deaths, IF one made it to an adult they lived far longer than you're suggesting (I think you realize this) childhood diseases caused many infant deaths, then we include warfare, infections IOW many things have changed for a higher average age today.

But I'm not selling anything, eat all the carbs & sugars you wish, many of us have learned better.
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You see that is your problem, ignoring reality.
Purposeful ignorance will not serve you well

Harvard Health

"Foods that fight inflammation
Doctors are learning that one of the best ways to reduce inflammation lies not in the medicine cabinet, but in the refrigerator. By following an anti-inflammatory diet you can fight off inflammation for good.


Updated: November 7, 2018Published: June, 2014
What does an anti-inflammatory diet do? Your immune system becomes activated when your body recognizes anything that is foreign—such as an invading microbe, plant pollen, or chemical. This often triggers a process called inflammation. Intermittent bouts of inflammation directed at truly threatening invaders protect your health.

However, sometimes inflammation persists, day in and day out, even when you are not threatened by a foreign invader. That's when inflammation can become your enemy. Many major diseases that plague us—including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, depression, and Alzheimer's—have been linked to chronic inflammation.

One of the most powerful tools to combat inflammation comes not from the pharmacy, but from the grocery store. "Many experimental studies have shown that components of foods or beverages may have anti-inflammatory effects," says Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology in the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Choose the right anti-inflammatory foods, and you may be able to reduce your risk of illness. Consistently pick the wrong ones, and you could accelerate the inflammatory disease process.

Foods that cause inflammation
Try to avoid or limit these foods as much as possible:

refined carbohydrates, such as white bread and pastries

French fries and other fried foods

soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages

red meat (burgers, steaks) and processed meat (hot dogs, sausage)

margarine, shortening, and lard


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The health risks of inflammatory foods
Not surprisingly, the same foods on an inflammation diet are generally considered bad for our health, including sodas and refined carbohydrates, as well as red meat and processed meats.

"Some of the foods that have been associated with an increased risk for chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease are also associated with excess inflammation," Dr. Hu says. "It's not surprising, since inflammation is an important underlying mechanism for the development of these diseases."

Unhealthy foods also contribute to weight gain, which is itself a risk factor for inflammation. Yet in several studies, even after researchers took obesity into account, the link between foods and inflammation remained, which suggests weight gain isn't the sole driver. "Some of the food components or ingredients may have independent effects on inflammation over and above increased caloric intake," Dr. Hu says.

Anti-inflammatory foods
An anti-inflammatory diet should include these foods:

tomatoes

olive oil

green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, kale, and collards

nuts like almonds and walnuts

fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, tuna, and sardines

fruits such as strawberries, blueberries, cherries, and oranges

Benefits of anti-inflammatory foods
On the flip side are beverages and foods that reduce inflammation, and with it, chronic disease, says Dr. Hu. He notes in particular fruits and vegetables such as blueberries, apples, and leafy greens that are high in natural antioxidants and polyphenols—protective compounds found in plants.

Studies have also associated nuts with reduced markers of inflammation and a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Coffee, which contains polyphenols and other anti-inflammatory compounds, may protect against inflammation, as well.

Anti-inflammatory diet
To reduce levels of inflammation, aim for an overall healthy diet. If you're looking for an eating plan that closely follows the tenets of anti-inflammatory eating, consider the Mediterranean diet, which is high in fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, fish, and healthy oils.

In addition to lowering inflammation, a more natural, less processed diet can have noticeable effects on your physical and emotional health. "A healthy diet is beneficial not only for reducing the risk of chronic diseases, but also for improving mood and overall quality of life," Dr. Hu says.



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As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content. Please note the date of last review on all articles. No content on this site, regardless of date, should ever be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinician.
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Old 01-24-2020, 12:04 PM
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5313038

This scientific paper is chock-full of insights.
Quote:
"Ketone body oxidation becomes a significant contributor to overall energy mammalian metabolism within extrahepatic ["outside of the liver"] tissues in a myriad of physiological states, including fasting, starvation, the neonatal period, post-exercise, pregnancy, and adherence to low carbohydrate diets."
The liver producing elevated ketones during the neonatal period and pregnancy are especially notable, IMO; these are the two periods in which the brain of the child is most rapidly growing (before birth and while breastfeeding). Ketones have been shown to be a much more efficient fuel for the brain so it makes sense that ketone levels would be elevated during this period:

Quote:
"The predominant fate of liver derived ketones is... extrahepatic oxidation. However, AcAc [acetoacetate] can be exported from mitochondria and utilized in anabolic ["growth"] pathways via conversion to AcAc-CoA by an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by cytoplasmic acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase. This pathway is active during brain development and in lactating mammary gland..."
This tells me that being in ketosis and eating a ketogenic diet while pregnant and breastfeeding is preferable over utilizing glucose for energy due to the ketone bodies effects on brain development.

This is further supported by the evolutionary process that brought about the ability for us to efficiently produce and use ketones:
Quote:
"The divergence of a mitochondrial from the gene encoding cytosolic HMGCS occurred early in vertebrate evolution due to the need to support hepatic ketogenesis in species with higher brain to body weight ratios."

"Similarly, hepatic Bdh1 [the gene that enhances ketone production] exhibits a developmental expression pattern, increasing from birth to weaning, and is also induced by ketogenic diet."
In addition to being a highly efficient energy substrate, ketones act as signaling molecules which induces oxidative stress protection.
Quote:
"For example, βOHB inhibits Class I HDACs, which increases histone acetylation and thereby induces the expression of genes that curtail oxidative stress."
With regards to oxidative stress, ketones, themselves, also act as antioxidants - especially protecting the central nervous system and the heart:
Quote:
"Antioxidant and oxidative stress mitigating roles of ketone bodies have been widely described both in vitro and in vivo, particularly in the context of neuroprotection. As most neurons do not effectively generate high-energy phosphates from fatty acids, but do oxidize ketone bodies when carbohydrates are in short supply, neuroprotective effects of ketone bodies are especially important ... Ketone bodies decrease the grades of cellular damage, injury, death and lower apoptosis in neurons and cardiomyocytes [heart muscle cells]."

"Ketogenic diet... exert neuroprotection in models of ischemic stroke; Parkinson’s disease; central nervous system oxygen toxicity seizure; epileptic spasms; mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like (MELAS) episodes syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease."

"Taken together, most reports link βOHB to attenuation of oxidative stress, as its administration inhibits ROS/superoxide production, prevents lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, increases antioxidant protein levels, and improves mitochondrial respiration and ATP production."
With regards to heart health, ketone bodies are extremely important to maintain cardiovascular function:
Quote:
"With a metabolic rate exceeding 400 kcal/kg/day, and a turnover of 6–35 kg ATP/day, the heart is the organ with the highest energy expenditure and oxidative demandThe vast majority of myocardial energy turnover resides within mitochondria, and 70% of this supply originates from FAO."

"Under physiological conditions normal hearts oxidize ketone bodies in proportion to their delivery, at the expense of fatty acid and glucose oxidation, and myocardium is the highest ketone body consumer per unit mass."

"Preliminary interventional and observational studies indicate a potential salutary role of ketone bodies in the heart. In the experimental ischemia/reperfusion injury context, ketone bodies conferred potential cardioprotective effects."

"Compared to fatty acid oxidation, ketone bodies are more energetically efficient, yielding more energy available for ATP synthesis per molecule of oxygen invested (P/O ratio)."
Note that the more fat oxidation occurring in your body, the higher your ketone levels will be: "Ketogenesis occurs primarily in hepatic mitochondrial matrix at rates proportional to total fat oxidation."
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Old 01-24-2020, 12:51 PM
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Then there is the science
Low carb = fail
Keto = fail
Keto = inflamation
No wonder the science says it is the worst diet
Good luck with a high fat low carb diet
Seriously, I hope keto drones have success in spite of the science
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Old 01-24-2020, 12:55 PM
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Ok Jack , you're not a fan, we get that; this is a thread for people doing the keto way of eating (or those interested in it) .

In case you didn't know it , many of the preferred foods for anti inflammatory are Keto ; despite my "willful ignorance" .

I researched/studied this way of eating for well over 2 years along with many others before deciding on Keto way of eating FWIW

ANY list that would list Weight watchers above eating real food cannot be trusted, and it's not secret that big Ag has pushed for what is now SAD etc. My guess is it might be ironic to see who paid for these "studies" & lists ....

Feel free to start your own thread on "your preferred diet" , but I think we've de-railed this one enough.
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