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Old 10-04-2012, 01:02 PM
equinelover equinelover is offline
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Default berries in pic what are they ?



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i have about 15 of these bushes with berries. what are they ? are they poisonous ? if they are not poisonous what can be made with them ?
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:46 PM
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Wild Cherries?

That's all I got, lol.
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:54 PM
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Viewing on my phone, so it is a little tough to tell, but they look like chokecherries. Have you smashed one and taken a whiff? If you find out that they ARE FOR SURE CHOKECHERRIES, they make good jelly and wine.
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:27 PM
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Take a sample to your local County Extension office. They should be able to tell you or find out.
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by equinelover View Post
i have about 15 of these bushes with berries. what are they ? are they poisonous ? if they are not poisonous what can be made with them ?
They almost look like a huckleberry, but those are some huge clusters. There are differnt types of chokeberrys because it's kind of a generic name. What state do you live in?
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:38 PM
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Old 10-05-2012, 07:32 AM
equinelover equinelover is offline
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have no idea what they are.

Quote:
Take a sample to your local County Extension office.
good idea i might do that.

made a little pot still with a coiled copper tube coming from the top but that did not do a very good job of distilling. like the wine idea a lot.
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Old 10-07-2012, 09:56 PM
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Greetings All,

I believe that the berries in your photo could be autumn olives, Elaeagnus umbellata, in the Russian olive family, the Elaeagnaceae. If you look closely, and see minute bronze scales spaced across the skin of the berries, similar to ones you could also notice on the cuticle of the underside of the leaves, or the richly rust-colored new twigs, then I could be correct. Each berry would also have a single, spindle-shaped ridged seed, soft enough to not ruin the impression of the berries. If true, then these delicious fruit (best when large and deep red in color) are great raw, but if you strain out the seeds they make exquisite jam.

Now, for the bad news. These delicious bushes if allowed, will take over everywhere until there is nothing but these bushes. Distributed by the birds, who also love them as food, they could soon be virtually ubiquitous in your area. This Asian species is probably the most successful invasive woody bush in North America. The pitiful thing is that when they get so thick they have choked out virtually every other plant, they virtually stop making berries.

Get back to us when you find out [or post a larger, closer photo]. Thanks for your picture.

Thanks for reading,

edibleplantguy
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Old 10-08-2012, 11:04 AM
equinelover equinelover is offline
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when you say olives i think olive oil. could olive oil be extracted from these little red berries ?

that sounds exactly like their behavior. will get better pictures when it is sunny.
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Old 10-08-2012, 08:30 PM
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Greetings equinelover,

This species is in the same family as the tree we call a Russian olive, Elaeagnus angustifolia. As far as the real olive family, Oleaceae, I don't know, off the top of my head, whether they were ever considered the same family.

I have never heard of any member of the Russian olive (or oleander) family being considered an oil plant per se. The red pigments in the berries are high in forms of Vitamin A, including lycopene, and they are oil-soluble vitamins, but I have yet to learn of someone extracting oil from it.

Thank you for attempting more pictures.

edibleplantguy
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Old 10-09-2012, 03:27 PM
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this is as close as the camera would go before it gets blurry.
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Old 10-10-2012, 11:46 PM
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Greetings equinelover,

Your middle shot (DSC00525) certainly captured in excellent detail the little 'bronze scales' that dot the cuticle of these autumn olive berries, Elaeagnus umbellata. Clearly your bushes are young enough to make great berries (and spread like crazy).

Try them. I think you will like them.

Thanks for taking the time to get detailed pictures; it made the ID a sure thing. Thanks for reading,

edibleplantguy

Last edited by edibleplantguy; 10-12-2012 at 07:55 AM.. Reason: Fixed spelling of 'umbellata'
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Old 10-10-2012, 11:58 PM
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Edibleplantguy, can those bushes survive the winter in northern states/southern Canada?
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Old 10-12-2012, 07:58 AM
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Greetings Steve28,

Yes, these plants are already hugely invasive in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Ontario and elsewhere. Clearly, they have lots of spreading possible in the future. I believe they are winter hardy from zones 3 or 4 to 8.

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Old 10-12-2012, 08:40 AM
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I have them all over my property. Difficult to get rid of.
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Old 10-12-2012, 08:46 AM
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I have them all over my property. Difficult to get rid of.


I'm thinking of introducing them here. There's way too much growing in Nova Scotia that we can't eat.
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Old 10-12-2012, 11:59 PM
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Greetings Steve28,

I would point out that there are quite a selection of edibles in Nova Scotia's native vegetation. If this Elaeagnus gets traction in your area, you will lose a lot more food than you gain. [And wildlife, birds, and flowers as well.]

Thanks for reading.

edibleplantguy
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Old 10-24-2012, 05:44 PM
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after picking them i got 2 gallons of berries. decided what i am going to do with them. ethanol. to make e85 or use in the alcohol stoves i make. with only 2 gallons of berries i expect maybe a quart of alcohol. more like a cup full. read the pdf "art of making whisky" and gin. bought some yeast to start the process.
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Old 10-25-2012, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edibleplantguy View Post
Greetings Steve28,

Yes, these plants are already hugely invasive in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Ontario and elsewhere. Clearly, they have lots of spreading possible in the future. I believe they are winter hardy from zones 3 or 4 to 8.

edibleplantguy
I'm fairly certain I have at least one of these behind the house. I'll have to verify at lunch.. if the past few frosts haven't knocked all the berries off
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Old 10-26-2012, 02:47 PM
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berries crushed. hot water added. yeast added. now the waiting. i figure about 3 weeks. fuel.

which type of yeast ? picked up a pack of each. used the redstar wine makers yeast. some said wine other said champaign but saw nothing that said ethanol.

it is going to get real cold and i do not have a fermenting building. so what ever happens....
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