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Old 08-28-2019, 07:21 PM
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Default SO AS a prepper, do you take these natural disasters into consideration?



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DIDN'T want to pirate the Dorian thread.

SO..
you live in a state where shi... er..a big weather events happens..
Do you take them into consideration for your preps as just the course of doing business
or
are they so rare an event that you really don't think about.. "OK how do I prepare for TSHTF AND a Cat 4 hurricane at the same time?" After all they do present different issues to deal with.

What happens to your preps if you live in tornado alley and well, while the world is coming to an end a cold front starts causing tornadoes to sprout?

Just curious.

I live in northern Mich so even without the world ending we have to prepare for blizzards that take out power and stop everything anyway. You get almost 4 feet of snow from a single event and you know you aren't going anywhere for a while and power staying on is a real luxury.

Just curious about you folks who might get nature at its worst.
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Old 08-28-2019, 07:28 PM
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Wildfire is the only one I face here,

And yes, it's a major preparation. There is a relatively high chance of facing it sometime during normal times, and I think a 100% chance of it when SHTF.
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Old 08-28-2019, 07:42 PM
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You prep for a Cat 5 Hurricane first which preps you for the SHTF i.e. you see you weak points, get an ideal of how to cope [think like going camping]. Fix your weak points then plan how to amp up past Cat 5 to SHTF. Essentially, if you can't manage 5 days or 2 weeks or 6 weeks then you fix things -- see how things are extended.

I'd say it is the same as Financial prepping. You deal clean up your debt, decide upon a level of 'cash on hand' and whether you are going the silver/gold route. In praticallity you are prepping for a 'job loss'/recession; food stockpiles, gardens, alternate income sources [sideline jobs, stock income]. Then you think about the next worse case financial scenario Major Depression and SHTF. It is a concept of 'I've got enough to pay the bills and not starve for 6 weeks, 6 months, and so on'. Utilizing cost cutting [gardens, food stockpiles, minimal debt, solar?, etc.] and income input [gardens, skills others might want etc.]

If you think medical SHTF you practice a bit of both, with more medical supplies and more self-training. Thus you got enough to deal with everyone in the house coming down with a normal flu at the same time, see your weaknesses, and amp up for a more major pandemic sort of thing. Learn more home cures, how keep the family healthy, etc.
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Old 08-28-2019, 07:47 PM
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Not too much you can do when a tornado wants to clean your clock. I've seen basements sucked right out of the ground.
We gear up to be tossed and hope for the best.
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Old 08-28-2019, 08:47 PM
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I’m concerned about flooding. One thing people may not realize is that post SHTF dams may break. Nobody will be able to control them.
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Old 08-28-2019, 09:01 PM
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`

Into consideration? They are the main reason I prep & was raised as a prepper, even though it wasn't called it back then. We frequently have blizzards, snow/ice storms, wind storms, hail, etc. etc. You can be snowed in for days in a real bad one, even in town. Then if the power goes out, especially if it's -40 & there's wind chill on top of that, it can get real sporty inside. Even in the summer when the power goes out, you have to worry about food going bad & can be no fun without AC. Luckily in the summer the longest we've been without power is about 10-12hrs IIRC. Luckily we have a gas stove so once we get that lit (have to light by hand when power is out) & plug a small fan into a battery pack it can keep fairly warm in the kitchen, dining room & living room area. Most everything else I prep for is what could or might happen.

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Old 08-28-2019, 09:16 PM
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We have earthquakes and wildfires. I was in the Loma Prieta earthquake and that made me realize how important it is to be prepared. We sat with two kids in front of a 4” battery tv and watched people panic. We didn’t have power, communication (except for a CB radio) or water. I decided then I wouldn’t ever feel that helpless again.
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Old 08-29-2019, 04:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NW GUY View Post
DIDN'T want to pirate the Dorian thread.

SO..
you live in a state where shi... er..a big weather events happens..
Do you take them into consideration for your preps as just the course of doing business
or
are they so rare an event that you really don't think about..
Everyone should spend some time and do a threat assessment for their region and what could impact them. I think weather-related conditions are the most prominent, followed by natural disasters; last are man-made threat vectors (excluding the planning for financial SHTF, injury-illness SHTF, etc.).

A house fire is always a real possibly and the first thing I point to for preparation; having a go-bag even if to escape to a hotel or family/friend's house to work through the insurance SHTF.

After that, asses your most common seasonal threats:

Wild fires
Blizzards
Hail Storms
Ice storms
Tornados/high winds
Hurricanes
Flooding
Droughts
Heat waves
Mud slides

All the above are frequent/seasonal occurrences for some regions. Even if you haven't seen a flood in 40 years, you should know if you're in a flood plane.

After those are the less frequent but potentially damaging natural disasters, such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis. Add in some of the pandemic threat vectors we've seen in the past.

Last are the potential man-made/caused disasters and those could include everything from civil unrest to a regional nuclear plant failure. Add in some that have occurred such as bio/chemical plants accidents/carriers such as trains derailing and spilling toxic material; toxic ground water, financial collapse. I think another one that is a serious threat and caused by man are the resurgence of disease due to serious lapses in city management and poor sanitation practices.

Back to the original question. I think you need to incorporate preps as just a part of doing business in those regions when it comes to natural weather threat vectors; however, they should also be used as the foundation of your preparations.

ROCK6
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Old 08-29-2019, 05:09 AM
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I certainly prep for snow, wildfire and drought. Most wildfires in Alaska are caused by lightning strikes, so I suppose we can classify wildfires as a weather event. Wildfires are perhaps my biggest weather related threat.
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Old 08-29-2019, 05:53 AM
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It seems we are either burning or flooding.
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:05 AM
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Here in Maine snow and long winters are really only natural disasters. Kind of hard to prep for snow short of having snow shoes.
Moving to a place with way less snow but did take a lot of consideration into natural disasters in it has NONE.
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:23 AM
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If for some reason that communications has broken down the effect of natural weather events can be magnified. We tend to take for granted checking the weather forecasts every day in order to plan. Is it going to rain, be ungodly hot? Is a hurricane, tornado heading our way? Many natural disasters can be ameliorated by knowing that they are heading our way. If by nothing else than hunkering down and riding out the storm.

News (information gathering) in a society wide breakdown is prep tool that will be missed.

Many years back my area suffered a major ice storm that took out power to my home for almost 3 weeks. I recall how in the dark (from lack of knowing what was going on) that it felt. It was especially so because I live remote and my only news source became a small FM radio and all the stations I could get were commercial syndicated ones with no local news.
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Old 08-29-2019, 12:49 PM
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Quote:
"OK how do I prepare for TSHTF AND a Cat 4 hurricane at the same time?"
You prepare to both survive and be relatively comfortable.
You don't just prepare for any specific "event".

Some events may require specific preparations, such as tying down loose items before a windstorm, but basic preparations are the same for all events, and those "specific" preparations are merely a part of trying to be prepared for anything that may happen.

Calling it "SHTF" is pointless because the term has no concrete definition.

Just try to imagine all the likely possibilities, and then figure out a way to handle them.

Right now for me, that means making sure the generator is working properly and that I have sufficient fuel for when Dorian shows up for a visit.
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Old 08-29-2019, 01:50 PM
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My degree is in Emergency Mgmt and includes risk assessment.

I took everything short of little green men into account.
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Old 08-29-2019, 02:12 PM
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Yes. We take them into consideration as part of preps. Illness and accident too. Job loss, family emergency, dog emergency, car breaking down, household issues. Prep for every situation you can think up. Have alternative backups,a nd then make those backups redundant yet again with more alternatives.
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Old 08-29-2019, 03:02 PM
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I think thats pretty much step one.
I live in the Chesapeake area. I can count on one or two blizzards each winter and hurricane action most summers, some direct hits, most minor effects.
I can expect closed roads for a day and usually the power out up to a day or two.
radio with batteries and some PBJs gets me through most stuff.

my wild card would be fire. I live near some woods and sometimes we get the hot dry summers that can breed fires. I had a few trees taken down near the house.
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Old 08-29-2019, 03:58 PM
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Blizzards happen, but so far that's never been a show stopper.

Tornadoes are possible. I have a (relatively) hardened basement room.
Never tested. Couple of years ago a huge tree blew down 150 feet
to the back. Otherwise there was damage around town and
out in the county, so it's an obvious risk.
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Old 08-30-2019, 11:24 AM
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I absolutely prepare for weather. Have already lived through two major hurricanes. In the first one, only a good bugout bag would've helped, but that was many years ago and I didn't know *anything* about storms. Was reasonably prepped for Katrina and it made a huge difference. Unfortunately we are also prone to tornadoes and can't do much about those beyond preparing for power outages. I figure my storm preps will help with a lot of other scenarios, so I focus on the most immediate and likely threat.

Last edited by Monique; 08-30-2019 at 11:34 AM.. Reason: typos, as usual
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Old 08-30-2019, 01:37 PM
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Hurricane prep and dealing with the aftermath is what got me into all of this. So to answer the OP's question, yes.
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Old 08-30-2019, 05:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jojo View Post
Not too much you can do when a tornado wants to clean your clock. I've seen basements sucked right out of the ground.
We gear up to be tossed and hope for the best.
Pretty sure my basement is not going to get sucked out of the ground by a tornado. I put several thousand lbs of rebar and four trucks loads of concrete in the footings, and four more truck loads in the walls. Then back filled the walls with eight ft of dirt and clay.

If folks are concerned about tornados, winter storms, extreme weather, or forest fires, they should consider insulated concrete form walls, and a steel roof.
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