All About Coffee - Page 3 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Food and water Discussion on food and water storage, water purification and related topics.

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-27-2019, 06:56 PM
jfountain2's Avatar
jfountain2 jfountain2 is offline
I was young 50 years ago
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: over yonder
Posts: 21,564
Thanks: 11,630
Thanked 32,779 Times in 12,356 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Firearms Post 
Total Awards: 1
Default



Advertise Here

In my GHB I have a supply of freeze dried espresso with cream and sugar that is actually pretty tasty.

Got it for Christmas a few years ago from my baby sister.

Maxpresso Instant Coffee, Espresso, 50 sticks (Pack of 2) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01G4LWFKG..._cmCzDbVZJ4DTK

One stick (it’s not a stick it’s a damn foil pack) will make a 4oz cup so I usually use about 4 packs per morning when I’m camping.
__________________
Read the rules. Follow the rules. Be nice to each other.
Post in the proper section. Stay on topic. Post useful accurate info.
Send me all your unsigned, not cashed in, winning lottery tickets
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to jfountain2 For This Useful Post:
Old 08-27-2019, 06:58 PM
GatorFL GatorFL is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 111
Thanks: 50
Thanked 250 Times in 84 Posts
Default

I'm a coffee geek I could go for days. I've tried just about everything and have settled on a few things.

For daily espresso I use a LaSpaziale Mini Vivaldi II and a MACAP M4 grinder. I typically go through 4lbs of espresso beans per month. As I stated earlier I typically buy from Lisbeth at Ethos Coffee. She grew up around coffee farms and travels to remote farms to source for her roastery. I highly recommend her shop, she's as good as or better than all the big boutique roasters.

I travel enough so whenever I am in a new town I'll find the best roaster and get a pound or two. It's a fun way to try new stuff.

Other than espresso, I love my French Press. I always keep a pound on hand for an occasional press. I think this is the purest form of coffee drinking. I am partial to Espro French Presses vs the glass ones.

I also have a Chemex. A Chemex is the smoothest coffee out there. It's a glass carafe and proprietary filter. It's a nice changeup especially when you have non-espresso drinking house guests over.

One neat thing I keep on hand is cascara. Its the cherry that comes off the coffee bean and dried. Makes a high caffeinated tea, it sort of tastes like raisins or even a tawny port when sweetened. It's hard to find in the USA, so when I find it I buy a big bag. 12oz is a huge bag and lasts a long time. I make it in the Chemex or a teapot. If I had to bug out I'd probably take the cascara, super easy to make and nice caffeine punch and it keeps much better than coffee since it's dried, not roasted.

Backpacking best i've tried is Starbucks Via. The weight savings is just too much vs anything else out there. I'm doing some of the Florida Trail this winter, I may take the cascara instead.
Quick reply to this message
Old 08-27-2019, 07:33 PM
IamZeke's Avatar
IamZeke IamZeke is offline
Beer Truck Door Gunner
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 26,483
Thanks: 27,720
Thanked 54,864 Times in 19,120 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jfountain2 View Post
One stick (itís not a stick itís a damn foil pack)
Another name for these tiny pouches is called a straw for some reason.

Why the industry wants to give them a nonsense nickname is beyond me.

Pouch or pack seems fine with me, but the drink industry can't help themselves.
__________________
Need more info? Try this:

Search using Google, type "site:survivalistboards.com" in Google's search box, followed by the search parameters. You can use all normal conventions, limit searches by date, etc. Works quite well and beats the native search function.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to IamZeke For This Useful Post:
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-27-2019, 10:36 PM
357 Magnum 357 Magnum is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 63
Thanks: 3
Thanked 142 Times in 52 Posts
Default

Use any coffee you like and cold brew it in County Line Cold Brew jar this is the smoothest strong coffee I’ve ever had the cold brew takes out the bitter edge try it you’ll probably like it
Quick reply to this message
Old 08-27-2019, 11:18 PM
~Black.Dog~ ~Black.Dog~ is online now
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,691
Thanks: 1,268
Thanked 3,987 Times in 1,235 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GatorFL View Post
I'm a coffee geek I could go for days. I've tried just about everything and have settled on a few things.

For daily espresso I use a LaSpaziale Mini Vivaldi II and a MACAP M4 grinder. I typically go through 4lbs of espresso beans per month. As I stated earlier I typically buy from Lisbeth at Ethos Coffee. She grew up around coffee farms and travels to remote farms to source for her roastery. I highly recommend her shop, she's as good as or better than all the big boutique roasters.

I travel enough so whenever I am in a new town I'll find the best roaster and get a pound or two. It's a fun way to try new stuff.

Other than espresso, I love my French Press. I always keep a pound on hand for an occasional press. I think this is the purest form of coffee drinking. I am partial to Espro French Presses vs the glass ones.

I also have a Chemex. A Chemex is the smoothest coffee out there. It's a glass carafe and proprietary filter. It's a nice changeup especially when you have non-espresso drinking house guests over.

One neat thing I keep on hand is cascara. Its the cherry that comes off the coffee bean and dried. Makes a high caffeinated tea, it sort of tastes like raisins or even a tawny port when sweetened. It's hard to find in the USA, so when I find it I buy a big bag. 12oz is a huge bag and lasts a long time. I make it in the Chemex or a teapot. If I had to bug out I'd probably take the cascara, super easy to make and nice caffeine punch and it keeps much better than coffee since it's dried, not roasted.

Backpacking best i've tried is Starbucks Via. The weight savings is just too much vs anything else out there. I'm doing some of the Florida Trail this winter, I may take the cascara instead.
Cascara is good stuff and very unique. I tripped the line between hobby and mental illness on coffee years ago.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to ~Black.Dog~ For This Useful Post:
Old 08-27-2019, 11:25 PM
~Black.Dog~ ~Black.Dog~ is online now
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,691
Thanks: 1,268
Thanked 3,987 Times in 1,235 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 357 Magnum View Post
Use any coffee you like and cold brew it in County Line Cold Brew jar this is the smoothest strong coffee Iíve ever had the cold brew takes out the bitter edge try it youíll probably like it
I do some cold brew as well but I use the Filtron brand. I have found that the fiber filter they use produces a better end product than others I've tried. I will check out your suggestion.
A cool thing about cold brew is that with the proper water/coffee ratio you can make a strong concentrate. It keeps for weeks (although I've never kept it around that long) and is kind of like having a liquid instant coffee on hand. It can be reconstituted hot or cold. As you said, great flavor and very smooth.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
Quick reply to this message
Old 08-28-2019, 12:30 AM
Eddie_T's Avatar
Eddie_T Eddie_T is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Southern mtns near eastern continental divide
Posts: 2,003
Thanks: 3,293
Thanked 2,381 Times in 1,265 Posts
Default

What makes the difference between brands of coffee?
Quick reply to this message
Old 08-28-2019, 01:00 AM
IamZeke's Avatar
IamZeke IamZeke is offline
Beer Truck Door Gunner
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 26,483
Thanks: 27,720
Thanked 54,864 Times in 19,120 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
What makes the difference between brands of coffee?
The blend, the source, and the degree of roasted beans.

With dozens of bean origins, the amount of each in what degree, and the different levels of roast the combinations are almost limitless.

It's as complicated as tea or wine. But there is much less snobbery involved.
__________________
Need more info? Try this:

Search using Google, type "site:survivalistboards.com" in Google's search box, followed by the search parameters. You can use all normal conventions, limit searches by date, etc. Works quite well and beats the native search function.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to IamZeke For This Useful Post:
Old 08-28-2019, 01:43 AM
~Black.Dog~ ~Black.Dog~ is online now
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,691
Thanks: 1,268
Thanked 3,987 Times in 1,235 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
What makes the difference between brands of coffee?
Mostly it's the quality of coffee they start with.
Most of the traditional big names that you see in the grocery store (Maxwell House and the like) use what we call Commodity coffee. Meaning that it is literally what is bought and sold on the world commodity markets. This is low quality stuff. Much of this is Arabica coffee, which is good but it's still lower tier. Then, many big roasters will blend in some of the even cheaper Robusta beans. Robusta is high yield, pest resistsnt, high caffeine coffee that will produce well at lower elevations. Much of it is grown in Thailand and Viet Nam. It doesnt taste too good so is used as a cheap filler and caffeine booster. What makes the big name brands taste different is the blends of coffee from different countries that they use. Different cultivars, soils, weather, elevation, fertilizers and methods of processing after harvest makes distinguishable differences between countries of origin.
What we have been seeing the past few decades is the rise of Specialty Grade coffee. Specialty coffee is grown with more care and so costs more to produce. It accounts for only the top 10% or so of all coffee grown in the world.
In the past, there have always been smaller roasters using Specialty Grade coffee but most people weren't aware of them. Starbucks actually gets the credit for changing that. Their meteoric rise made people aware of specialty coffee and began to educate them about things like the fact that coffee actually comes from places like Sumatra. Kenya, Costa Rica, Panama, Ethiopia and others. Before, the average Joe (see what I did there? lol) was only familiar with national brand names. Thanks to The Colombian Coffee Federation's Juan Valdez, some became aware that Colombia grows a lot of coffee, but other than that it just wasn't on our radar.
Now, small, local Specialty coffee roasters and shops are popping up all over. Most are offering Single Origin coffees as opposed to blends. Again, there are distinct differences between coffee grown in Guatemala as opposed to Yemen, for instance. The idea is to enjoy all the different tastes that coffee has to offer instead of trying to make blends that always taste the same. That's not to say that blends can't be great. Some combinations, like Mokha-Java are fantastic. Sine others not so good.
Once we get into using better beans and understand that coffee from different countries and even regions and farms within each country produce profoundly different flavors there are still many factors that can affect what we are tasting.
Different roasting methods (drum, fluid air bed), types of heat (electric, gas) produce different results. Roasting styles (dark, medium, light) naturally affect the flavor. And let's not forget the skill of the person doing the roasting. With the explosion of Specialty coffee there are a lot of new kids on the block. Some are artistic geniuses. Some, well...not so much.
The last, but perhaps one of the most important factors is freshness. Coffee is not considered a perishable product. It does not harbor bacteria and can be drunk years after it is roasted with no ill effect. It just may not taste all that great if you are used to better, fresher stuff. It will still taste like coffee and if you are used to canned brand names it will taste pretty much the same as you are used to.
In its green state coffee can be stored in its sack for a year or two before the flavors begin to noticeably degrade. Much longer if stored in an oxygen free, temperature controlled environment. Once it's roasted, however, the clock begins ticking. Coffee is at its peak of flavor within the first two weeks after roasting. It's amazing and once you start drinking fresh roasted coffee it is difficult to turn back.
I hope this has helped answer your question!


Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
Quick reply to this message
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to ~Black.Dog~ For This Useful Post:
Old 08-28-2019, 01:57 AM
IamZeke's Avatar
IamZeke IamZeke is offline
Beer Truck Door Gunner
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 26,483
Thanks: 27,720
Thanked 54,864 Times in 19,120 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Black.Dog~ View Post
I hope this has helped answer your question!
LOL. I tried to answer his question short and fast but I knew he asked the wrong question here.

Someone was bound to start laying it all out.

But hey, I was expecting about 4 times what you wrote. Good restraint.
__________________
Need more info? Try this:

Search using Google, type "site:survivalistboards.com" in Google's search box, followed by the search parameters. You can use all normal conventions, limit searches by date, etc. Works quite well and beats the native search function.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to IamZeke For This Useful Post:
Old 08-28-2019, 02:37 AM
johnclaire0198 johnclaire0198 is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

same here! haha i used to drink 4-7 cups a day but i limited it to 1-2 cups a day because of my GERD
Quick reply to this message
Old 08-28-2019, 05:07 AM
Justme11's Avatar
Justme11 Justme11 is offline
French Prometheus unbound
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Houston
Posts: 27,334
Thanks: 30,004
Thanked 65,187 Times in 20,028 Posts
Default

Basic coffee is made from a blend of peat moss, dried mouse turds and pencil shavings. (and sometimes comes from the rear end of a cat to improve its flavor).

Fine coffee grows from high equatorial mountains, is sung to by angels while it is growing, and is harvested, dried and roasted by a monastic order of priests that have been given this calling and this sacred trust to serve man for countless millennia, (well, 2 actually).

Then more angels fly it to our towns where sects of artisan monk-baristas create their steamy expressions of joy. Bold, rich, smooth, complex and deeply moving. A brew that rewards us for our having lived another day, and urges us ever forward in our journey toward enlightenment.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Justme11 For This Useful Post:
Old 08-28-2019, 05:58 AM
Henrykjr Henrykjr is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 850
Thanks: 11
Thanked 1,412 Times in 445 Posts
Default

I do all of my coffee out of a French Press and Expresso from a Nespresso.

Coffee:
Melita Medium Roast good well rounded coffee
LaVazza Oro: Very good tasting coffee light to medium in taste
Illy: I would drink this stuff everyday if it were not $22/pound best tasting mass produced coffee hands down.
Other great brands imported from Germany: Tchibo Exclusive (robust), Dallmeyer (mild) Jacobs Knonumg( Medium)

Expresso for Nespresso:
Lavazza 8, 10, 12
Nespresso Purple and Black Capsules

While growing regions have some influence on coffee taste.......it not really as important as when the cherry is harvested. The more ripe the cherry the less bitter it tends to be.

How an cherry is roasted is very important and this is where you get the very wide variation on taste for the same bean.

Lastly...storage of coffee before use has a HUGE impact on flavor. Here is why ILLY is so good: https://www.illy.com/en-us/company/c...ycaffe-history

HK
Quick reply to this message
Old 08-28-2019, 06:52 PM
GatorFL GatorFL is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 111
Thanks: 50
Thanked 250 Times in 84 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Henrykjr View Post
I do all of my coffee out of a French Press and Expresso from a Nespresso.

Coffee:
Melita Medium Roast good well rounded coffee
LaVazza Oro: Very good tasting coffee light to medium in taste
Illy: I would drink this stuff everyday if it were not $22/pound best tasting mass produced coffee hands down.
Other great brands imported from Germany: Tchibo Exclusive (robust), Dallmeyer (mild) Jacobs Knonumg( Medium)

Expresso for Nespresso:
Lavazza 8, 10, 12
Nespresso Purple and Black Capsules

While growing regions have some influence on coffee taste.......it not really as important as when the cherry is harvested. The more ripe the cherry the less bitter it tends to be.

How an cherry is roasted is very important and this is where you get the very wide variation on taste for the same bean.

Lastly...storage of coffee before use has a HUGE impact on flavor. Here is why ILLY is so good: https://www.illy.com/en-us/company/c...ycaffe-history

HK
Sorry, I have to disagree with the bolded points.

Regions are critical to coffee cultivation, it is the same thing with grapes for wine. Terroir. It needs altitude and moderate rain. You want a small coffee bean, this means the coffee bush was stressed. If the bean is large, it means it was not stressed. Last year we went to Costa Rica and did a coffee plantation tour. They had their beans from the lowlands and the highlands. The lowlands beans (maybe 75 miles away) were much smaller because it didn't rain very much. Up in the highlands by the Arenal, it rains all the time. Beans were huge. Same type of plant too. When we roasted, ground and brewed them the difference was stunning. Like drinking a Bud Light vs a Goose Island IPA.

All you guys drinking Nespresso, Illy, Starbucks, etc don't know what you're missing. Roasted coffee beans oxidize, doesn't matter how they are stored. It's a natural decay and the older the coffee after a roast the less flavor it has. Find a good craft roaster and try a pound, the difference is stunning.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to GatorFL For This Useful Post:
Old 08-28-2019, 11:17 PM
~Black.Dog~ ~Black.Dog~ is online now
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,691
Thanks: 1,268
Thanked 3,987 Times in 1,235 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GatorFL View Post
Sorry, I have to disagree with the bolded points.



Regions are critical to coffee cultivation, it is the same thing with grapes for wine. Terroir. It needs altitude and moderate rain. You want a small coffee bean, this means the coffee bush was stressed. If the bean is large, it means it was not stressed. Last year we went to Costa Rica and did a coffee plantation tour. They had their beans from the lowlands and the highlands. The lowlands beans (maybe 75 miles away) were much smaller because it didn't rain very much. Up in the highlands by the Arenal, it rains all the time. Beans were huge. Same type of plant too. When we roasted, ground and brewed them the difference was stunning. Like drinking a Bud Light vs a Goose Island IPA.



All you guys drinking Nespresso, Illy, Starbucks, etc don't know what you're missing. Roasted coffee beans oxidize, doesn't matter how they are stored. It's a natural decay and the older the coffee after a roast the less flavor it has. Find a good craft roaster and try a pound, the difference is stunning.
This man speaks the truth.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to ~Black.Dog~ For This Useful Post:
Old 08-29-2019, 07:41 AM
Eddie_T's Avatar
Eddie_T Eddie_T is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Southern mtns near eastern continental divide
Posts: 2,003
Thanks: 3,293
Thanked 2,381 Times in 1,265 Posts
Default

Could something like the Emeril Lagasse Power AirFryer 360 Plus (convection oven) be used to roast beans? Normal scenario rather than SHTF.
Quick reply to this message
Old 08-29-2019, 08:04 AM
GatorFL GatorFL is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 111
Thanks: 50
Thanked 250 Times in 84 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
Could something like the Emeril Lagasse Power AirFryer 360 Plus (convection oven) be used to roast beans? Normal scenario rather than SHTF.
I have never roasted but I've looked into it multiple times. Most people start roasting with a popcorn popper. It makes a lot of smoke and you have to check the beans as they roast. I would think an air fryer is overkill.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to GatorFL For This Useful Post:
Old 08-29-2019, 09:41 AM
~Black.Dog~ ~Black.Dog~ is online now
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,691
Thanks: 1,268
Thanked 3,987 Times in 1,235 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
Could something like the Emeril Lagasse Power AirFryer 360 Plus (convection oven) be used to roast beans? Normal scenario rather than SHTF.
I'm not familiar with that Machine. Temperature-wise probably so. But does it provide motion?
It takes heat and motion to roast coffee. In the case of an air popcorn popper, the airflow is strong enough to bounce the beans around the same way it does popcorn. The movement allows the beans to absorb heat evenly so the roast process can kick in. It's actually a chemical chain reaction taking place.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to ~Black.Dog~ For This Useful Post:
Old 09-02-2019, 06:48 PM
browningv308 browningv308 is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,138
Thanks: 44
Thanked 1,064 Times in 523 Posts
Default

Black Rifle CAF and Gunship then occasionally I'll suffer and get some Dunkin Donuts or Mc Donalds brand. I make mine with an electric kettle and an American press because I'm an American When outside trout fishing, hunting or camping I'll use the Kelly Kettle and a small travel press.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to browningv308 For This Useful Post:
Old 09-02-2019, 10:47 PM
randolphrowzeebragg randolphrowzeebragg is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 1,396
Thanks: 240
Thanked 1,695 Times in 791 Posts
Default

I like the cheap, instant, off-brand crap that is sold at Dollar Stores and other outlets. It bites when you drink it, and it's got lots of caffeine. I found a jar in an old backpack that I haven't used in at least ten years and it had solidified into a big black chunk. It was so hard that I couldn't chip a piece out with my hunting knife, so I poured a cup of boiling water into the jar, swished it around, and poured it back into the cup and it tasted like it always did. Woke me up and tasted great with bacon and eggs cooked over a fire.
Now That's Coffee!
Quick reply to this message
Reply

Bookmarks



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:47 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net