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Old 08-13-2019, 06:42 AM
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I use field corn as fish bait... It takes about 90 minutes of boiling to make it soft enough for a hook. After maybe 60 minutes it is probably edidble. I only keep 50# in my storage because it would require a lot of fuel to make edible. Grinding by hand is said to be way more difficult than popcorn kernels. Now that I am looking into making ethenol, maybe I will store more corn.
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Old 08-13-2019, 06:51 AM
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Originally Posted by nicktide View Post
I use field corn as fish bait... It takes about 90 minutes of boiling to make it soft enough for a hook. After maybe 60 minutes it is probably edidble. I only keep 50# in my storage because it would require a lot of fuel to make edible. Grinding by hand is said to be way more difficult than popcorn kernels. Now that I am looking into making ethenol, maybe I will store more corn.
If you first parch the corn kernels they are much,MUCH easier to grind: https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...42&postcount=4
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Old 08-13-2019, 07:43 AM
wldwsel wldwsel is offline
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I have about 1000 acres of farm fields within site of my house. 1 year, he plants field corn, next year cotton, next year soybeans, next year he plants peanuts. They don't plant the same crop each year because it depletes the soil of minerals the plant needs. Same with tomatoes - you need to change the location every 3-4 years or they get leggy and don't put on as much fruit regardless of the fertilizer you put on them plus if you get any plants with disease, it stays in the ground and future tomatoes will suffer. Onions, however don't seem to care how long you plant them in the same soil.

When he plants corn, it's very likely field corn, which stays on the stalk until it's completely dry. If you pick some early, while the shuck is still green, it's perfectly edible, although chewy. If you were going to can it, you would need to blanch it to stop the enzymes from doing their enzyme thing while it's in the jar. Sweet corn is the same, as, I believe, other vegetables are.

Having said all that, before I went into a farmer's field and started picking his corn, I'd get with him and ask, probably proposing a trade of something for something. Otherwise you might get a butt full of rock salt. Rather than taking his crop, why don't you start gardening in your yard? You won't do too well the first 3-4 years, but as you learn, you'll get better at it. Do it now, rather than when SHTF comes.

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Old 08-13-2019, 08:17 AM
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Nixtamalisation works well.
Here's a video that shows how to process field corn into masa then tortillas.
Pretty much the same process I use.

https://youtu.be/nKwCv9PyPyc
Thanks for that video. I'd thought about how to use field corn and this is just perfect. How long does lime store for? Some of what I found was that it will start to break down.
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Old 08-13-2019, 08:49 AM
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Thanks for that video. I'd thought about how to use field corn and this is just perfect. How long does lime store for? Some of what I found was that it will start to break down.
From what I've read, if it's stored in an air tight container, indefinite storage life.
I use new metal gallon paint cans from Home Depot and keep 3 of them down cellar.

I've also read that the Injuns used steeped wood ash but I have never tried it.

Zeke would probably be the one to answer this, he does a lot more research than I do.
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Old 08-13-2019, 10:06 AM
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Thanks for that video. I'd thought about how to use field corn and this is just perfect. How long does lime store for? Some of what I found was that it will start to break down.
Hydrated lime can go bad if exposed to air. I had a bag in the basement that was open and after about a year it took more and more of it to get the shell of the corn. After about 18 months it didn't work at all even if I went 50:50/corn:lime

My understanding is the hydrated lime absorbes co2 from the air and turns it back into lime stone. In theory you could heat it again to turn it back into hydrated lime.

This video explained the lime cycle.
You can also make your own hydrated lime by collecting mussel/clam shells then heating them over and extremely hot fire. They should turn to powder and now be quick lime, mix it with water and it will produce A LOT of heat and now it is slaked lime or hydrated lime.
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Old 08-13-2019, 04:54 PM
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I've also read that the Injuns used steeped wood ash but I have never tried it.

Zeke would probably be the one to answer this, he does a lot more research than I do.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixtamalization#History

How nixtamalization was discovered is not known, but one possibility may have been through the use of hot stones (see Pot boiler) to boil maize in early cultures which did not have cooking vessels robust enough to put directly on fire or coals. In limestone regions like those in Guatemala and southern Mexico, heated chunks of limestone would naturally be used, and experiments show that hot limestone makes the cooking water sufficiently alkaline to cause nixtamalization. Archaeological evidence supporting this possibility has been found in southern Utah, United States.

The Aztec and Mayan civilizations developed nixtamalization using slaked lime (calcium hydroxide) and ash (potassium hydroxide) to create alkaline solutions. The Chibcha people to the north of the ancient Inca also used calcium hydroxide (also known as "cal"), while the tribes of North America used naturally occurring sodium carbonate or ash.

The nixtamalization process was very important in the early Mesoamerican diet, as unprocessed maize is deficient in free niacin. A population that depends on untreated maize as a staple food risks malnourishment and is more likely to develop deficiency diseases such as pellagra, niacin deficiency, or kwashiorkor, the absence of certain amino acids that maize is deficient in. Maize cooked with lime or other alkali provided niacin to Mesoamericans. Beans provided the otherwise missing amino acids required to balance maize for complete protein.

The spread of maize cultivation in the Americas was accompanied by the adoption of the nixtamalization process. Traditional and contemporary regional cuisines (including Maya cuisine, Aztec cuisine, and Mexican cuisine) included, and still include, foods based on nixtamalized maize.

The process has not substantially declined in usage in the Mesoamerican region, though there has been a decline in North America. Many North American Native American tribes, such as the Huron, no longer use the process. In some Mesoamerican and North American regions, dishes are still made from nixtamalized maize prepared by traditional techniques. The Hopi obtain the necessary alkali from ashes of various native plants and trees. Some contemporary Maya use the ashes of burnt mussel shells, while other Maya cook maize with small pieces of limestone.


Unless you are in a region where you can get limestone readily then you'll have to make an alkali solution from wood ash. You can look online on how to make soap from wood ashes and the alkali water you would mix with the fat would also be useful for nixtamalization. So you get two handy uses from running the water through your fire ash.

Of course it is just easier to have slaked lime on hand, but I was referring to when supplies are gone. For your lime storage I suggest storing it in 5gal plastic buckets with an o-ring seal so it doesn't have fresh air constantly mixing with it.
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Old 08-13-2019, 05:16 PM
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As itís just me and my wife, we simple dry both dent and flint (for hominy) on the cob till it lets loose by hand twisting the cob. A little more drying in the greenhouse, then winnow it & toss it in gallon big mouth jars. All set for bread, muffins, tamales, pancake, any recipe calling form corn meal.
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Old 08-13-2019, 06:29 PM
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For seed you just want it dry and safe from bugs and rodents. Same for chicken and turkey feed, but it should be cracked first. Old farmers had a hammer mill for this. Deer, goats and larger livestock can eat it uncracked. For Tamales and grits you want a rough grind. For tortillas and cornbread etc. you want a fine flour grind. Dried corn and dry beans are very hard on a flour mill meant for wheat so either get a tough one, or extra grinding plates. Soaked corn can be ground much easier in a table-top meat grinder.
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Old 08-13-2019, 06:32 PM
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixtamalization#History
Of course it is just easier to have slaked lime on hand, but I was referring to when supplies are gone. For your lime storage I suggest storing it in 5gal plastic buckets with an o-ring seal so it doesn't have fresh air constantly mixing with it.
How does corn bread get around the nixtamalization issue?
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Old 08-13-2019, 06:44 PM
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How does corn bread get around the nixtamalization issue?
There's no connection at all.
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Old 08-13-2019, 06:58 PM
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How does corn bread get around the nixtamalization issue?
It doesn't. If your entire diet is corn bread you will get pellagra. Corn meal is gritty and kind of sand like, it doesn't stick together well and you can't really make a dough of it, more a batter. Nixtamilized corn is much stickier and holds together much better, that is why you can make tortillas from it. Although it isn't nearly as sticky or holds together as well as a wheat flour.
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Old 08-13-2019, 07:40 PM
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How does corn bread get around the nixtamalization issue?
^^^^What they said.
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Old 08-14-2019, 09:49 PM
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field corn makes a reasonable roastanear if picked early,as a youngster i would pick the ears when they was about size of your finger and eat them raw cob and all,they are pretty sweet at that stage,once ready for harvest and dry,throw the kernals in a big hot cast iron skillet with just a smear of lard or bacon grease intill browned,stir constantly, then rough grind,you can eat that way or boil until semi soft tastes a lot like grits boiled and is very filling..
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Old 08-19-2019, 05:17 AM
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Free corn!
During the harvesting process, some corn gets knocked down, and farmers will let you scavenge what is left.
Look at the end of the rows, where the machine turns around.
Also look for crows, they can spot the downed corn for you.
Last year I easily picked up enough to feed 1 cob a day to the wildlife.
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Old 08-30-2019, 03:43 PM
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Another think to keep in mind to avoid getting shot by a trigger happy farmer is to figure out who owns the field and talk to them before you harvest any. I am sure if it was a shtf situation you could work out a deal with them for some of the corn you harvest. I.E I'll give you 50% of the corn I harvest since as payment since you dont have any equipment to harvest it. Also harvesting by hand also goes best when done by a group so in that situation you could get a group together to process the corn and split it up.
Also corn shellers make life a lot easier!
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Old 08-31-2019, 12:25 PM
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You can can fresh corn and it preserves well. But, first you need to know what kind of corn is planted in that field. These days not all corn is suitable for human consumption with the first kimf coming to mind is corn used to make ethanol. It's not the same animal..
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Old 09-06-2019, 04:25 PM
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In Mexico I read the people eat field corn on a regular basis.

I also just read you need to use Food Grade Diotomaceous Earth to store dried corn. Do not use the pool grade filter DE. Health food stores sell food grade DE.

You don't need to "pack the corn" in the DE". A sparse dusting will do it. Then recycle the rest into another bin again and again.

Pool grade DE is bad for you.....
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Old 09-06-2019, 05:15 PM
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Field corn is what is used for cornmeal or for masa if it is nixtilimized.

I tried making cornbread with dried masa meal but it didn't turn out well. I did it just the once though.

If you enter corn sheller on amazon they have a surprising variety, from hand ones for less than $5 to cast iron crank for <$50 to fully mechanized power ones for over $1,000. No idea as to quality or longevity.

Hadn't heard of ethanol specific corn. It seems to have genetically added enzymes to help the conversion process. It can be fed to livestock, possibly for contractural reasons? Possibly not for human consumption because not thru regulatory process?
http://www.agweek.com/business/agric...learning-curve
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Old 09-12-2019, 04:13 AM
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whole grain cornmeal does not keep nearly as well as unground corn. I actually keep it in the fridge or freezer. Buying it in 25 lb bags is much cheaper. Bobs red mill cornmeal at cash and carry is about $18/ 25 lb bag, thats not on sale price. A 20 ounce bag is around $3 at grocery.
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