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Old 12-05-2017, 09:32 PM
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Ridiculous. You're not getting or keeping any kind of cow. You have no idea what it is to go out and feed them everyday.
Actually, I do. Which is the other reason I won't be getting one, be it ever so miniature, or even ever so good at living off browse.

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You can study a book all day but I won't trade my Daisy for a 32 inch tall cow ever. She is our family cow and you don't seem to understand what that means.
Did I tell you to get rid of your family cow? Of course I didn't. But as you pointed out, if someone is shopping for a miniature cow for a small homestead, it would likely pay them to investigate carefully just how mini what they're looking at is likely to end up, among other breed differences, before it becomes Daisy, a member of our family.
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Old 12-05-2017, 09:35 PM
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Zebus are hard to find here, and some other Indian miniature breeds impossible, but there are several of those that are true minis. I've seen pics of them full grown with their owners.

Average one is 35 inches tall, 290 pounds, and gives 3 quarts of milk a day. Now that's a miniature cow. And it's an old, old breed.

But I won't be getting any of them. Even the Highland minis only shared the house with their owners in the winter.
For singles or couples there is also dwarf *****ian goats. Their milk is supposed to be the richest of the goat milk varieties at 1-3 quarts per day. Not really practical to make butter out of it but it can make cheese, yogurt, etc...

Plus they are small and goats are so much fun (I don't like the idea of getting knocked around by livestock). I could see goats that size running in the same yard as dogs and probably having a blast doing it. And they are so easy to feed! Can even clear weeds.
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Old 12-05-2017, 10:38 PM
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I was searching for recipes online and found this recipe for oatcakes:

https://pennysrecipes.com/7324/recip...ional-oatcakes

They use oatmeal, butter, baking soda, salt, and water. Now I am going to have to try it.

Recently, I made a pretty good cheese & onion pie with a basic crust recipe like this: https://www.thespruce.com/easy-oil-p...-recipe-304979

Flour, oil, and salt. That is it. I topped it with cheese and diced onions, put in the oven, and it actually tasted pretty good. Yeah, you can jazz it up by adding more veggies or seasonings, or make a pizza out of it, but for 5 ingredients that most people would have, it makes several servings. Not too shabby.
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Old 12-05-2017, 11:23 PM
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I was searching for recipes online and found this recipe for oatcakes:

https://pennysrecipes.com/7324/recip...ional-oatcakes

They use oatmeal, butter, baking soda, salt, and water. Now I am going to have to try it.
Another fine old Scots staple.

Oatcakes are delicious with cheese and with nut butters, can be turned into instant cobblers crumbled up with some fruit and sugar and optionally topped with a bit of cream, made into a graham cracker-style unbaked pie crust, and make an excellent replacement for breakfast toast--oatmeal you can eat with your hands for breakfast on the go. I always have some around.

It's unfortunate they are so little known in the US. Nairn also makes them in cheese and pumpkin seed versions as well these days, but just plain oats is the original.

Even the baking soda is optional (it's a modern addition), and you can use any oil/fat and in a smaller quantity. Although the traditional ones are made with Scottish oatmeal, which is ground, not rolled oats, ground-up American rolled-oat oatmeal will work. You just get a somewhat different texture.
https://www.theguardian.com How to Cook Perfect Oatcakes

A good ol' traditional recipe favored in my family--probably because it had oats to keep the Scot happy and bacon drippings to keep the Virginian happy. (A Scot would be as likely to have beef or lamb drippings as pork drippings. Use what you have. Tallow makes a longer-keeping oat cake than lard, and ghee or coconut oil also will give them a longer shelf life than polyunsaturated oils.)

Bannocks (Oatcakes)

4 oz (125g) medium oatmeal (Scottish ground oat meal)
2 t bacon drippings/melted fat
2 pinches baking soda
Pinch of salt
3 to 4 T hot water
Additional oatmeal for kneading

Mix the oatmeal, salt and soda and pour hot melted drippings into the center. Stir well with a wooden spoon and add enough water to make into a stiff paste.
Cover a board with oatmeal and turn the mixture onto this. Work quickly so it doesn't cool and stiffen.
Divide into two and roll one half into a ball and knead with hands covered in oatmeal to stop it sticking. Roll out to around quarter inch thick. Put a plate which is slightly smaller than the size of your cast-iron pan over the flattened mixture and cut round it to make a circular oatcake. Cut into farls (4 wedges) and place in the lightly greased heated pan.
Cook for about 3 minutes, until the edges curl slightly, turn, and cook on other side.
Get the next oatcake ready while the first is being cooked.

You can also bake your bannocks in a 375F/190C oven for about 30 minutes, until brown at the edges.
This makes 2 bannocks about the size of a dessert plate, 8 farls. If you want more, make up a new batch of dough for each 2 bannocks you want.
Store in a tin and reheat in a moderate oven when required.
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Old 12-06-2017, 02:57 AM
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Originally Posted by thyme2bprepped View Post
Ridiculous. You're not getting or keeping any kind of cow. You have no idea what it is to go out and feed them everyday. You can study a book all day but I won't trade my Daisy for a 32 inch tall cow ever. She is our family cow and you don't seem to understand what that means.
Feed?

The cows I Co-own with my buddy just eat grass.

In winter he uses his tractor every so often to drop bale of hay (baled from his property) next to them.

...that's it.


IMHO the only reason to have them.... well 2 is:
1. Natural increase/profit
2. Sustainability.

It's too easy to pick up a cheap cow at auction, or like I've talked about before.... an even cheaper horse.
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Old 12-06-2017, 05:40 AM
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Feed?

The cows I Co-own with my buddy just eat grass.

In winter he uses his tractor every so often to drop bale of hay (baled from his property) next to them.

...that's it.
Except, I assume, for the daily milking, unless they're just pasture decoration.
And in cold northern climates, the usual breeds seen in this country require a bit more upkeep.

But we should probably leave dairy cows at this point and get back to recipes using their milk and butter, since recipes and not farming is supposed to be the subject of this thread.
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Old 12-06-2017, 06:58 AM
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Feed?

The cows I Co-own with my buddy just eat grass.

In winter he uses his tractor every so often to drop bale of hay (baled from his property) next to them.

...that's it.


IMHO the only reason to have them.... well 2 is:
1. Natural increase/profit
2. Sustainability.

It's too easy to pick up a cheap cow at auction, or like I've talked about before.... an even cheaper horse.
You're right Nomad. I don't feed my cattle, they actually feed themselves. I only bring them hay twice a day, and make sure they have water.
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Old 12-06-2017, 09:50 AM
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Ok I will throw a recipe out there. Don't have a name for it and some of you will laugh and others will probably turn green but it's actually pretty good and it's true cupboard scrounging. In fact when you are 23 and single and two days before payday you had money for either beer or food when you come home with beer you find this stuff. Trust me I know

1 potato baked or nuked
1 can of tuna
1 can of corn (creamed or regular)

Mix the tuna and corn and put it on the tater.

Finding a bit af Lawry's knocking around in the cupboard along with some shredded colby jack or chedder that hasn't molded yet really sets this off. Actually it's good enough I still make it a couple times a year although with less questionable ingrediants. Wife and daughter really like it. Son can't stand the smell of tuna. He only eats the bluegills and pike he catches.
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Old 12-06-2017, 10:04 AM
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Actually it's good enough I still make it a couple times a year although with less questionable ingrediants. Wife and daughter really like it. Son can't stand the smell of tuna. He only eats the bluegills and pike he catches.
Tuna is awesome on just about everything, but never thought to try it on a baked potato! I often melt some butter, throw in a tablespoon of flour and a little milk to make sort of a cream sauce, then add the tuna. It is great over pasta or toast (or possibly a baked potato). With pasta it makes for a very warm/filling comfort meal.

Last night it was cream of chicken soup with leftover baked chicken chunks poured over rice. God it was good, I might have licked the plate if the dog's weren't staring at me and silently saying "You better not eat every last bite!". So I had to show restraint and leave a bit for them.
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Old 12-06-2017, 10:36 AM
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Except, I assume, for the daily milking, unless they're just pasture decoration.
And in cold northern climates, the usual breeds seen in this country require a bit more upkeep.

But we should probably leave dairy cows at this point and get back to recipes using their milk and butter, since recipes and not farming is supposed to be the subject of this thread.
No, they are meat cattle.
-feeding 2x/day was mentioned, NOT milking 2x/day!

My Fire chief doesn't even cut hay for the couple cows he milks, but he DOES Give them a bucket of sweet feed when he milks them.
(Nowhere near saturation, it cures on the stem.)

But that's to bribe them to come and stand.

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Originally Posted by thyme2bprepped View Post
You're right Nomad. I don't feed my cattle, they actually feed themselves. I only bring them hay twice a day, and make sure they have water.

You have so many cows they go through a round bale 2x/day!?!!!
Why not bring them 2x as many and only do it 1x/day.

My buddy does it wx/week.

Guess like me and FB you shoulda done this where water wasn't an issue!
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Old 12-06-2017, 11:04 AM
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No, they are meat cattle.
-feeding 2x/day was mentioned, NOT milking 2x/day!

My Fire chief doesn't even cut hay for the couple cows he milks, but he DOES Give them a bucket of sweet feed when he milks them.
(Nowhere near saturation, it cures on the stem.)

But that's to bribe them to come and stand.




You have so many cows they go through a round bale 2x/day!?!!!
Why not bring them 2x as many and only do it 1x/day.

My buddy does it wx/week.

Guess like me and FB you shoulda done this where water wasn't an issue!
You must think I'm far wealthier than I am. We're not rich but we like to feed our animals fresh food daily. We also have loads of water living between two rivers, though the cattle do not know how to use the faucet yet.
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Old 12-06-2017, 11:39 AM
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You must think I'm far wealthier than I am. We're not rich but we like to feed our animals fresh food daily. We also have loads of water living between two rivers, though the cattle do not know how to use the faucet yet.
Ok, I thought it was pretty obvious I was tongue firmly Inbedded in cheek: but your acting serious:

So on a serious tone: why bring them hay 2x/day vs letting them get at a round bale?

Too bad about the faucet. Perhaps you need smarter cows!
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Old 12-06-2017, 11:50 AM
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Ok, I thought it was pretty obvious I was tongue firmly Inbedded in cheek: but your acting serious:

So on a serious tone: why bring them hay 2x/day vs letting them get at a round bale?

Too bad about the faucet. Perhaps you need smarter cows!
I'm not too serious and I do need smarter cows.

I wish we had a tractor, a herd of cattle, a hay field, and a friend to do the work.

We only have the momma and her son. I don't think they could eat that hay fast enough. Plus we usually get ice, snow, and rain, which would deteriorate the quality of the hay. I give 20 lbs in the morning and 20lbs in the evening. If I gave 40 lbs in the morning it would be gone by noon and they would be yelling at me, or worse.
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Old 12-06-2017, 11:52 AM
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I have been using the "Buddha Bowl" formula for a while now. It's a good way to use your pantry and/or fresh food, depending on whatever you have on hand.

Essentially, you cook up a carb like rice or noodles. Add something for protein and a veggie or two. You can mix and match whatever's in your fridge. Top with some hot sauce or soy sauce, and you easily have a meal for 1. You don't have to use the same combos more than once if you don't want to (unless you don't have much else in your pantry). On the weekends, I'll cook up a batch of rice just so I can throw together some meals during week nights when I am more pressed for time.

Also, I recently discovered popovers, which are a great snack if you don't have a lot on hand except some flour, eggs, salt, milk, and butter. Add a little sugar or serve them with jam or peanut butter, and you'd probably make kids happy.

http://www.moderndomestic.com/2009/0...tech-popovers/
Not sure what popovers are, but your Buddha bowl sounds suspiciously like what we do. Take the random leftovers from the fridge throw them in a glass dish and mix in a can of cream of mushroom soup or cream of celery or maybe even cream of chicken.

Round here we call that a casserole
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Old 12-06-2017, 12:14 PM
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A couple of recent threads got me thinking about old recipes designed to make a meal out of almost nothing to make a meal with. Thought it would be fun to ask what people's favorite something-from-nothing recipes might be.
Just in case anyone was wondering what the actual topic of the thread was....




Let's stop arguing about cows please (or start your own thread about them)
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Old 12-06-2017, 01:03 PM
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When my cupboard is bare I grab the toaster, and shake it upside down hoping for crumbs. I can use them as a breading on any small animal that isn't faster than me. Fry it in a pan and bon apetit!
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Old 12-06-2017, 01:16 PM
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Not sure what popovers are, but your Buddha bowl sounds suspiciously like what we do.
Popovers are awesome but can be tricky to bake, they look like muffins but are hollow inside and have a deliciously rich, buttery flavor along with a crispy/chewy crust. Tricky part is getting them to fill up with air while baking, plus they are sort of a delicacy since they should be baked fresh and eaten shortly after.







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Take the random leftovers from the fridge throw them in a glass dish and mix in a can of cream of mushroom soup or cream of celery or maybe even cream of chicken.

Round here we call that a casserole
Haha...reminds me of my "holier than thou" vegetarian brother in law. He used to eat everything in huge bowls all mixed together (mostly sprouts and such). One year we all went up to the cabin and everyone was a bit shocked (including the dogs) to see him happily eating out of a large stainless dog bowl. I guess he found it in the sink and decided it would be the perfect size for one of his "buddah bowl" meals. That was good for a laugh.
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Old 12-06-2017, 01:26 PM
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When my cupboard is bare I grab the toaster, and shake it upside down hoping for crumbs. I can use them as a breading on any small animal that isn't faster than me. Fry it in a pan and bon apetit!
Ah a true Al Bundy trying to live off of toaster leavings. That show was awesome in the 90s.
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Old 12-06-2017, 01:29 PM
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Wow those popovers look awesome! Throw us a recipe?
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Old 12-06-2017, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Potawami II View Post
1 potato baked or nuked
1 can of tuna
1 can of corn (creamed or regular)

Mix the tuna and corn and put it on the tater.

Finding a bit af Lawry's knocking around in the cupboard along with some shredded colby jack or chedder
This will come out very tasty made with some cooked-up dehydrated storage potatoes as well--dices, slices, or hash browns. I'd throw in a little spinach or some canned green chilis/diced bell peppers plus some diced onion and call that a perfect meal. Skip the cheese and mix it with a little homemade mayo or just some salad dressing, and you have a good summer dinner salad.

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I often melt some butter, throw in a tablespoon of flour and a little milk to make sort of a cream sauce,
This is not "sort of" a cream sauce, it is classic cream sauce. Stir flour into butter and cook for a few minutes to cook the raw flavor out and then slowly stir in milk to get the thickness you want. A pinch of salt, a pinch of pepper, a pinch of nutmeg and you have cream sauce. In fact, you have bechamel, sauce 1 of the 5 classic French sauces. (Use broth instead of milk, and you have sauce 2, velouté.) Add some celery, mushrooms, or whatever, perhaps a few pinches of herbs, use a mix of milk and broth, and you have made true cream-of-whatever soup.

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Originally Posted by Potawami II View Post
Not sure what popovers are,
I was just wondering how many people know what popovers are any more, since I've never seen popover mix in a store.

Milk, eggs, flour, salt, and fat baked into a kind of eggy roll souffle. You can add a bit of sugar if you want them sweet instead of savory and/or throw in some additional ingredients, but they're a perfect Mother Hubbard recipe--the plainest of ingredients turned into something delicious and a bit different.
What Makes Perfect Popovers? (with recipes for plain, cinnamon-sugar, and pepper-Jack-and-chive versions



More recipes for basic popovers, from King Arthur flour to Martha Stewart (or just see your Joy of Cooking):
https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/popovers-recipe
https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/f...opovers-351609
https://www.marthastewart.com/326501/perfect-popovers

The British call their version Yorkshire pudding, preferably made with the drippings from a roast, as in roast beef and Yorkshire pudding:
http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2...er-recipe.html
https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/y..._pudding_69240
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