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Old 11-21-2017, 05:47 PM
mygunisjammed mygunisjammed is offline
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Default Is 146.520 a Ham Radio thing?



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I saw a post in my facebook feed that said "when shtf, tune in to 146.520 every three hours for three minutes". I've never had a ham radio, but is this what this is a reference too?
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Old 11-21-2017, 06:10 PM
Hunter Don Hunter Don is offline
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Default Is 146.520 a Ham Radio thing?

That's the 'calling frequency' for the 2Meter band. Lots of folks monitor it currently.
when I travel I can typically raise someone on that frequency while going through cities/towns


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Old 11-21-2017, 06:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mygunisjammed View Post
I saw a post in my facebook feed that said "when shtf, tune in to 146.520 every three hours for three minutes". I've never had a ham radio, but is this what this is a reference too?
This sounds like part of the Channel 3 project, which was to use channel 3 (CB, FRS, GMRS, MURS) in the event of disaster. Originally it was 3-3-3; use Channel 3, try to transmit for 3 minutes, try again in 3 hours (on the hour) in order to preserve battery life. Now it's 3-2-1; Channel 3, try for 2 minutes, try again in 1 hour (on the hour). The frequency of contact was changed because three hours was felt to be too long to get urgent traffic through. People will probably use it on the 2m and 7cm calling frequencies, too. You'll find both 3-3-3 and 3-2-1 around the web. As long as you're doing it on the hour, eventually you'll hit someone using either.
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Old 11-21-2017, 06:49 PM
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146.52 is the "channel 19" of amateur radio. When I travel on the highway I monitor that frequency at all times.

Interestingly, if there is a serious wreck on the interstate and traffic is backing up, I can often give a call and make contact with a fellow ham going in the opposite way. It reminds me of CB in the 60's when people were civil on the radio.
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Old 11-21-2017, 06:54 PM
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That's 146.52 megahertz FM. The National Call Channel. It's a simplex, or direct radio-to-radio channel. No repeaters or tones involved. I made a mobile travel contact a week or so ago using my ICOM 2M rig on high power, say 50 Watts. Distance between radios was about 20 miles. Lots of ham radio clubs have their own designated simplex frequencies. Handy in grid down situations for local communications if the repeaters lose power.
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Old 11-21-2017, 07:14 PM
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Yes, 146.52 is the National Simplex Calling frequency. You might Google the keywords "Wilderness Protocol" for an explanation of its proper use. In areas outside repeater coverage stations are encouraged to monitor "52" for five minutes at the top of the hour to listen for, reply to and assist, or relay emergency calls. Non-emergency calls, such as for communication checks and signal reports, to see who is listening should wait until 5 minutes AFTER the top of the hour. The calling channel shpuld not be tied up for idle chit-chat, but may be used to briefly make initial contact before moving off to an appropriate working frequency, in exactly the same manner that VHF ch.16 is used in the coastal and inland marine services.

146.55 is comonly used for mobile-to-mobile simplex on Interstate highways and also for base-to-mobile for traveler's information
146.58 and 147.54 are common, widely used simplex frequencies.

In the 6-meter FM band 52.525 is used for calling and 52.540 for routine chat.
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Old 11-21-2017, 07:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazooka Joe View Post
This sounds like part of the Channel 3 project, which was to use channel 3 (CB, FRS, GMRS, MURS) in the event of disaster. Originally it was 3-3-3; use Channel 3, try to transmit for 3 minutes, try again in 3 hours (on the hour) in order to preserve battery life. Now it's 3-2-1; Channel 3, try for 2 minutes, try again in 1 hour (on the hour). The frequency of contact was changed because three hours was felt to be too long to get urgent traffic through. People will probably use it on the 2m and 7cm calling frequencies, too. You'll find both 3-3-3 and 3-2-1 around the web. As long as you're doing it on the hour, eventually you'll hit someone using either.
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Also more info can be found here.
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Old 11-21-2017, 11:16 PM
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EXCEPT the 146.42 is a TYPO because in the North American Band Plan it is a repeater input.

HERE is the original document from which they mangled theirs:

USA-PREPCOM: A suggested radio coms standard for USA preppers

From Original Concept By R-UK, as Adapted for US Band Plans by KE4SKY

The objective of the USA-PREPCOM is to coordinate between licensed amateur and unlicensed citizens band, Family Radio Service, Multi-Use Radio Service and other USA based survivor radio stations following a major disaster in which conventional telecommunications have ceased.

For easy mnemonics the standard is the RULE OF 3S
3 is the important number. Remember it!
The 3 parts to the Standard are:

• 1/3:WHEN (Time coordination so we all know WHEN to call and listen)
• 2/3:WHERE (Frequency coordination so we all know WHERE to call and Listen)
• 3/3:HOW (Radio set-up so that everyone’s transmissions are compatible)

What’s this document for?

It is intended that this document be printed and stored in a water and light-proof pouch which is to be kept with stored radio equipment intended for disaster communications.

PART 1/3 =WHEN
Everybody looking to communicate needs to coordinate the time at which to do so.
By coordinating times and limiting operational time window precious electrical power will be conserved

Rule of 3s again:
Start communication sessions On the hour
Every 3 hours (starting 00.00h)
For 3 minutes calling and listening, if nothing heard, close the station and try again at next scheduled time.


Note, if a contact is made it is good practice to move communications to another channel / frequency so that the emergency calling channel is freed for other users
There is no requirement to end it after the magic 3 minutes, it can continue as long as required, but bear in mind power consumption.

PART 2 =WHERE
Where relates to Frequency coordination so that everyone is also communicating on compatible frequencies, failure to coordinate frequency is like not knowing the direction in which to flash a torch to signal to someone at night. We need to know exactly where to send and where to look.

Rule 2 is broken into two parts 2a for simple License-free transceivers (CB, FRS and MURS walkie-talkies), whereas 2b Ham is a full version incorporating both license-free and USA Ham frequencies.

PART 2a =WHERE License free
So for license free, the RULE of 3 continues. Set your radio to one of the following:

• AM only US CBs = Channel 03 26.985 Mhz AM US band
• SSB capable CBs = Channel 33 27.335 MHz USB
• FRS and GMRS = Channel 03 462.6125 MHz FM- NB (CTCSS/ DCS code turned OFF)

• FM-NB only MURS = Channel 03 151.92 MHz FM-NB MHz (US band)

PART 2b/3=WHERE Full version

USA Emergency Frequencies: From ARRL Net Directory

3723 MHz CW Emergency Response Communications Net CW
3883 MHz LSB Emergency Response Communications Net SSB
3907 MHz LSB Coastal Carolina Emergency, Missionary Radio Service
3935 MHz LSB Central Gulf Coast Hurricane Net
3940 MHz LSB Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Net
3950 MHz LSB National Hurricane Center
7.137 MHz CW Emergency Response Communications Net CW
7.238 MHz LSB Mobile Emergency and County Hunters Net
7.240 MHz LSB Eastern Region NTS Traffic
7.244 MHz LSB Tahoe Interstate Emergency Net
7.251 MHz LSB North States ARS, South Coast ARS
7.255 MHz LSB East Coast ARS
7.258 MHz LSB Midwest ARS
7.260 MHz LSB Baptist Disaster Relief Net
7.265MHz LSB Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Net
7.284 MHz LSB Good Sam RV Radio Network
7.292 MHz LSB Emergency Response Communications Net SSB
14.244 MHz USB Emergency Response Communications Net SSB
14.260 MHz USB Baptist Disaster Relief Net
14.265MHz USB Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Net
14.280 MHz USB International Mission Radio Net
14.300MHz USB Maritime Mobile Service, INTERCON Traffic, Pacific Seafarer’s Net
14.303 MHz USB International Emergency Assistance and Traffic Net
14.315 MHz USB Pacific Islands Disaster Net
14.325 MHz USB Hurricane Watch Net
14.336 MHz USB Mobile Emergency Assistance and County Hunters Net
14.340 MHz USB California-Hawaii Traffic and Emergency
26.985 MHz US AM CB Ch 03 Prepper Emergency Channel*
27.065 MHz US AM CB Ch. 09 – Motorist Emergency Calling
27.185 MHz US AM CB Ch. 19 – Highway Traffic Advisory
27.555MHz USB CB FREEBAND ( Illegal frequency) but well populated.
27.335MHz USB CB Ch 33 Emergency Channel*
462.5625 MHz FM FRS Ch.1 – unofficial calling channel
462.6125 MHz FM FRS Ch3 Prepper emergency channel***
462.675 MHz FM GMRS Ch. 6 Unofficial Travelers Information /Repeater input 467.675 PL 141.3
================================================== ===
* License free: Rule of 3s = CB Ch 03 FM every 3 hours, on the hour for 3 minutes (staring 00.00h)

** License free: Rule of 3s = CB Ch 33 USB every 3 hours, on the hour for 3 minutes (staring 00.00h)

*** License free: Rule of 3s = PMR446 Ch3 (CTCSS/DTS OFF) every 3 hours, on the hour for 3 minutes (staring 00.00h)
================================================== ==
PART 3/3=HOW to set up the radio and transmitting antenna

3.1 Identifying and setting the operating MODE of your radio

In all descriptions there are annotations FM/USB/LSB/FM NB. These are the different TYPES/ FORMATS/MODES of signal that radios can transmit.

It is essential that sending and receiving stations are using identical transmission TYPES otherwise they will not be able to hear one another even if transmitting and receiving on the same frequency at the same time.

Look at your radio: If it has a MODE knob it will allow you to select the modes required. If it does not have a mode knob and it’s a CB it will almost certainly be FM only. This should be confirmable by looking for a label or stamp of conformity on which the letters FM will be shown.

FRS equipment is only manufactured in FM variety so no choices to make.

3.2 POLARITY of your antenna.
For CB the antennas must be vertical
For FRS and GMRS antennas must be vertical
For Ham frequencies below 28MHz antennas must be HORIZONTAL
For Ham frequencies used in FM mode above 28MHz antennas must be VERTICAL
For Ham Frequencies used in LSB/USB mode above 28 MHz antennas must be HORIZONTAL
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Old 11-21-2017, 11:25 PM
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have no comment other than to say thanks! I learnt summin today
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Old 11-22-2017, 07:22 AM
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+1 for 146.520. Another frequency to monitor if you are a HAM and have a dual band radio is 446.000. This is the 70cm national calling frequency. Often in major metropolitan areas if 146.520 is crowded or noise levels are high 446.000 with be clear and quiet.
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Old 11-22-2017, 07:26 AM
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I have been trying to get someone on the national calling 2m for quite a few weeks with my mobile 65w and 30ft height antenna and havnt got a single person. Mean while the local repeaters could be blowing up. Idk mabe people dont monitor it much here.
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Old 11-22-2017, 09:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Outpost75 View Post
EXCEPT the 146.42 is a TYPO because in the North American Band Plan it is a repeater input.
Repeater inputs stop at 146.37

Simplex is 146.40 to .58

Unless im reading that wrong.
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Old 11-22-2017, 10:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k0diak314 View Post
Repeater inputs stop at 146.37

Simplex is 146.40 to .58

Unless im reading that wrong.
Not on the east coast, especially PA, NJ, MD, WV, VA, both SERA and T-MARC coordination areas.
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Old 11-22-2017, 10:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brettny View Post
I have been trying to get someone on the national calling 2m for quite a few weeks with my mobile 65w and 30ft height antenna and havnt got a single person. Mean while the local repeaters could be blowing up. Idk mabe people dont monitor it much here.
Most people operating on 2m simply monitor their favorite repeater. I don't think I've ever monitored 146.520.

Once contact is made with somebody I want to talk to, we often switch over to an unused simplex frequency if we are within simplex range. Which is why it pays to have that 50 watts and big antenna handy. No sense tying up a popular repeater when you don't need to.
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Old 11-22-2017, 11:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Outpost75 View Post
Not on the east coast, especially PA, NJ, MD, WV, VA, both SERA and T-MARC coordination areas.
T-MARC doenst have any with 146.420 on the inputs or outputs.

Link

SERA doesnt list their database online. PA doesnt have any (my QTH).

There is a simplex repeater listed in Dumfries, Virginia...N4LRA.

Im just doing my own research...not trying to pick a fight
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Old 11-22-2017, 11:45 AM
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T-MARC lists Ashton, MD 146.700- with no PL, which is 146.40 input.

PA has several using odd splits with inputs in this range because I hear them ID from my WV QTH.

And like you say, SERA doesn't list theirs publicly.

Not trying to start a fight either, just asking people to check local band plans and use good operating practice so as not to cause adjacent channel interference.
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Old 11-22-2017, 12:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lagnar View Post
Most people operating on 2m simply monitor their favorite repeater. I don't think I've ever monitored 146.520.

Once contact is made with somebody I want to talk to, we often switch over to an unused simplex frequency if we are within simplex range. Which is why it pays to have that 50 watts and big antenna handy. No sense tying up a popular repeater when you don't need to.
I have one of the old Kenwood 12 channel crystal units that serves as a dedicated 52 radio. It made 8 contacts in the past year.
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Old 11-22-2017, 02:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k0diak314 View Post
Like this?



Also more info can be found here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Outpost75 View Post
EXCEPT the 146.42 is a TYPO because in the North American Band Plan it is a repeater input.
146.42 isn't a typo on the image. But that frequency is specifically for amrron/taprn members/affiliates. They wanted to move their group comms slightly away from the general call freqs so as not to hog those.
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Old 11-26-2017, 01:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lagnar View Post
Most people operating on 2m simply monitor their favorite repeater. I don't think I've ever monitored 146.520.

Once contact is made with somebody I want to talk to, we often switch over to an unused simplex frequency if we are within simplex range. Which is why it pays to have that 50 watts and big antenna handy. No sense tying up a popular repeater when you don't need to.
I've made these same moves and for the same reasons. I'm KW5STW.

Just prognosticating, but I think in time of widespread repeater failure, 146.52 would be the simplex frequency hams would next migrate to if they were using two meters.
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Old 11-28-2017, 08:39 AM
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I constantly monitor 146.520. Anytime I am in my truck my radio is tuned to it. And when I travel it is on that freq. Even my handheld is tuned to that freq.
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