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Old 02-09-2020, 05:00 PM
ebjr1967 ebjr1967 is offline
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Originally Posted by Weedinhoe View Post
Hmmm... what varieties have you tried and when do you plant them out into the garden? I ask because not all varieties have worked for me, including some that others have said grow big heads for them. But not for me!
Timing can usually be the problem. Too hot, and they will bolt. Too cold, and they will button, small heads.
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Old 02-09-2020, 05:15 PM
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I commonly buy a 25# or 50# bag of blackoil sunflower seed and then I lightly disc (till) an area of field and broadcast the sunflower seed out into it and I get a small field of pretty bright yellow sunflower plants on the cheap. I have never actually tried to harvest them I have just always let them grow and later used as a treat for the goats in the late summer and fall. They are also good at keeping goats and deer distracted from a garden.
Oil is something that you really cant stash for very long, so I have done a lot of experimenting with oil production that I can grow. In this climate black oilseed sunflowers is probably been my best bet. I can grow them easy, but like you I haven't got serious about doing anything with them. I have an oil press, but anything I have pressed is a LOT of labor.
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Old 02-13-2020, 07:15 PM
Thesenator223 Thesenator223 is offline
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My 2020 garden plans are for tomatoes, pickling cukes, romaine lettuce and Roma green beans and butternut squash.
I can buy onions, beets, jalepeno peppers and green peppers by the bushel cheaper locally than I can raise them.
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Old 02-24-2020, 04:55 PM
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As the surgery to repair the ACL in my left knee went well and I am actually recovering (!!!) I am planning on plowing up and disking over another area to devote to vegetables to be grown and donated. It's rained yesterday and last night so I'll have to wait a few days before I can plow and disk, but it's about the right time.

I am not planning a lot of variety, instead focusing on ease of growth and nutritional content. So here, that means sweet potatoes, tomatoes and peppers. Maybe cantaloupe instead of peppers, I don't know yet. Ordered more sweet potato slips this morning and have the tomato plants taken care of as well. I will have to make a decision on the peppers/cantaloupe tomorrow.

There is a local church mission that will take all the fruit and vegetables I can grow.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:01 AM
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Plans for the early spring stuff have been totally disrupted by all this rain. Peas should have been planted on the 14th and right now only one bed is in and was planted a couple days ago. I guess I'll find out just how heat tolerant Wando peas really are as they'll come in late.

Still haven't been able to plant potatoes. And the first round of broccoli and cabbage plants should have been in the ground several weeks ago. I might have to put them in pots to keep them from getting rootbound.
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Old 02-26-2020, 03:12 PM
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Plowed and disked today. The ground dried up quicker than I thought it would. Very cold and windy but still a good day for it. I'm going to work disk in some soil activator. I tried it a few years ago and I like it.
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Old 02-26-2020, 03:38 PM
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I have been digging the 6 to 12 inch layers of snow off of my garden after I got all the new water plumbing taken care of. It has gone from swamped all around my planter boxes to doing pretty good, I don't have to wade anymore...

After getting the snow cleared off and the soil thawed I have been adding wheelbarrow loads from another thawed garden area and then re covering over with a layer of leaves or grass to keep the soil from freezing again from the coming snows. Snowed another couple inches this afternoon but with the leaves and grass on there it helps to melt it off pretty quick.

I actually got some garlic and Swiss chard planted this last week. I have leeks, brussels sprouts, garlic, onions, chives, garlic chives and tomatoes starting in the house at the moment.

Hoping to have all the snow removed from the garden in the next 2 to 3 weeks and hopefully our snow will be intermittent and relatively light after that.
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Old 02-26-2020, 04:08 PM
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I couldn't do that. I'm not that diligent anymore. It was in the upper 40s today and a strong north wind and I thought I was going to die from hypothermia out there. Y'all who homestead in the north have my admiration. I couldn't do it.
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Old 02-26-2020, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Mazarine33 View Post
I couldn't do that. I'm not that diligent anymore. It was in the upper 40s today and a strong north wind and I thought I was going to die from hypothermia out there. Y'all who homestead in the north have my admiration. I couldn't do it.
lol... It was in the mid 30's here and I had to strip down to my t shirt a few minutes in... But I got two more planter boxes done and ready to plant today... Not enough gas left in me to gather any leaves or grass to put over it yet, but I can get to that tomorrow...
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Old 02-28-2020, 07:02 PM
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Wow, I had high hopes when I chose this garden spot years ago that the water runoff from the large pond behind my house would help to melt snow off early enough that I could work the garden earlier in the year. That ended up being a double edged sword as it then made the ground to wet to work.

Year before last I started working out how to manage the water flow and raise my growing areas up out of the wet soil and last year I had a heck of a garden. This year I am finally getting the payoff on being able to work it early "and" not having it be too mucky wet to deal with. Here I am the end of Feb and I think I will have my potatoes in this weekend. Never have I ever been able to accomplish something like that before... I am a tad jazzed at the moment... We are supposed to get some snow this weekend, hopefully it won't be enough to derail the potato planting...




I am going to do four 14 foot rows of potatoes about 30 inches wide each. I am going to bring in some good soil and mound it about 12 inches high and maybe a foot wide or so and then cover all of that with about a foot of mulch beside and on top. As the potatoes manage to sprout out of the soil I will add some more mulch to keep them protected for a while. I should have about 6 weeks before the plants are out of the soil and mulch and by then I should be good weather wise. Or so goes the theory anyways... we will see...
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Old 02-28-2020, 08:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Mountain View Post
Here I am the end of Feb and I think I will have my potatoes in this weekend. Never have I ever been able to accomplish something like that before... I am a tad jazzed at the moment... We are supposed to get some snow this weekend, hopefully it won't be enough to derail the potato planting...
I'm planning to get some seed potato in the ground soon too, the Oklahoma State University Ag Extension office says mid-March is the best time to plant. Of course, I am considerably further south than you, so I hope your plans work out!

I used to want to move somewhere further north like where you are. But as I get older, I am not so set on the idea any longer. It's probably just as well to stay where I'm at, I've gotten used to the climate here.
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Old 03-10-2020, 12:12 PM
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I am nearly done with my main garden 2020. I have brought in another 15 yards of material into the garden this year and about 7 1/2 yards left to bring in. I am slowly building it up with organic material and raising the level of the soil over the plumbing I have installed to keep the soil up out of the water. My pond drainage runs through this garden as well as a leak in my dam, so at the moment I have about 6,000 gallons a day running through this area. It has been a bit of a gardening challenge to say the least, but the water seems to help melt off the snow earlier so I can work the garden earlier.

Yesterday I did the basic groundwork for the second to last section of my garden. I should be completely done by the end of this week.



The upper portion has been done for a bit and is already planted in with cold weather crops, beets, turnips, rutabaga, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, leeks, moss parsley, giant red globe radish, white icicle radish, kohlrabi, Swiss chard, peas, nasturtiums, garlic, shallots, bunching onions and potatoes.



This is what my garden area originally looked like 6 years ago...




Tomorrow when in town taking the wife to her two doctors appointments I will go ahead and pick up 20 pounds of ammonium nitrate, some clear plastic, some lettuce seed, celery seed, mustard seed, spinach seed, carrot seed, watercress seed, more leek seed, more peas, more nasturtiums and a 25 pound bag of black oil sunflower to broadcast on a bank and maybe some other areas.

Left to do after getting the garden physically built is to order in my drip tube and get the automatic watering system installed into it.

Then on to some Hugelculture experiments until the snow melts off of the big upper garden area.
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Old 03-22-2020, 05:01 PM
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I have thought for years that I would like to do an automatic garden watering system but I don't have enough water pressure to run much for sprinklers so I was thinking more along the idea of a drip irrigation system. A couple months ago I was watching various Youtube videos on drip irrigation and I saw some systems being installed in India and I really liked the emitters they used, the emitters actually sprayed out tiny streams of water in a 360 degree pattern with a reach of about 6 to 12 inches at fairly low pressure. I searched and searched trying to find those style of emitters and finally found a supply on Ebay. I ordered three 100 piece bags of them for just under $5.00 a bag and free shipping.

I finally received them a few days ago and started getting more serious about looking at what kind of deal I could get on some 1/2 inch drip tubing. With all of this Coronavirus stuff and delayed and even suspended shipping I wasn't sure I would even be able to buy my tubing at this point. I have a "lot" of old garden hose that has leaks and whatnot, but I thought I might give that a test and see if the emitters can be installed into the old garden hose.... It worked great, I just sharpened the end of one of my old chainsaw files to put the holes in the hose and with just a little work I am able to insert the emitters just fine. The emitters then sprayed out great, a little too great at the moment, but the pressure should reduce as I add 296 more emitters into the system. They were spraying out about a 6 foot diameter from the emitter with just four of them installed. I had some issues with algae in the hose blocking up the emitters so I will have to clean out the hose before finishing this off. I have quite of bit of chlorine mixed up from the pool tablets I bought the other day to clean my well and house pipes with, I currently have about 100 feet of hose with chlorine water in it sitting there breaking loose and killing off the algae. After I get all the rest of the hose together I will go ahead and do some more treatment and clear all of it as well. Run the hoses until they run nice and clear and start the long process of installing all 300 emitters into it...





I still have to section all the pieces of old hose together yet, but I have more than enough to get the job done. Now that I don't have to spend $100 on drip tubing I got permission from the wife to buy a couple "new" 100 foot garden hoses when we are in town next week..



These drip tube systems are handy with the low pressure requirements, just about any old junk garden hose could be used to put one of these in if need be. I am sure I will have plenty of little leaks in these pieces of hose, but that is actually kind of the idea in drip tube irrigation... lol... I love the fact that I can adjust the flow rate of each of these emitters and dial them in to where I need them. This should allow me to do a pretty dang long run and dial back the emitters at the beginning of the run and open them up at the end of the run to balance out my flow rate. Now to get all this together and look through the hundred or so old transformers I have and find one of appropriate voltage to run the water controller out there by the garden and have my automatic watering system up and running in the garden...
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Old 03-23-2020, 10:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountain View Post
I don't know what you have for a tiller, but tilling in small circles would be a bit of a trick. Especially with my mammoth tiller, I have a ten horse hydraulic commercial tiller weighing in at around 650 to 700 pounds or so.

You might find it easier to till a straight line and then hand till the fertilizer and whatnot into your circles.

Last year I raised all of my garden up as I was getting too much moisture from a small leak in my dam. That allowed the water to stand in the ditches between my planter boxes and with the tops of the beds 14 inches above the standing water level in the ditches I had an awesome garden. I am still using the squash/ zucchini and pumpkin from last years garden. I just picked up a hog a couple weeks ago and I have been feeding all the squash and whatnot that was starting to turn a bit.

I have been collecting all of my seed from the squash, zucchini and pumpkins and this next year I want to try and grow them under my pine and fir trees in my southern forest.
I just finnished soil prep for my round 3 sisters gardens. I used a Mantis Tiller which worked very well, even when I got to the center.
I no longer own a large tiller. I own field tractors and a disk.
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Old 03-23-2020, 11:42 AM
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Default Planting early: Plant covers.

Last frost date here is April 20, but we are down in a valley, it's really at least 2 weeks later for us most years.

One year I tried 1/2 a plastic barrel to sit over the plants... worked well.
Next year tried to plant tomatoes and peppers 2 weeks early, did well. I started with one's that had a top I could put on or take off (see photo), but after forgetting several times, I figured out there is not need to open them up at all until the plant get's too big for the 1/2 barrel.

I will plant a month early (now) a few that I put jugs of water in.

I will plant the rest 2 weeks before out last frost date, including the 1/2 barrel halfs that even have open bungs.
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Old 03-23-2020, 11:54 AM
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I plant in May after the last full moon, which is the 7th, no frost danger after that.

I'm adding another small plot so I can plant cukes and squash. Overall, adding more soil and dry-composted cow manure to enrich the soil. Bringing the height up a little to make it easier to tend.
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Old 03-23-2020, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Iamfarticus View Post
I plant in May after the last full moon, which is the 7th, no frost danger after that.

I'm adding another small plot so I can plant cukes and squash. Overall, adding more soil and dry-composted cow manure to enrich the soil. Bringing the height up a little to make it easier to tend.
Our average last frost is May 15th here... I only have frost tolerant and cold hardy things planted at the moment. I will plant my warmer weather crops the beginning of June hopefully, if it is warm enough anyways. Three years ago we were having overnight lows of high teens and lows 20's the first week of July so one has to play by it by ear here...
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Old 03-23-2020, 11:26 PM
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Our average last frost date is March 28, which is coming up this weekend. But I usually don't plant the warm-weather stuff for another month or so after that.
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