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Old 02-02-2020, 01:21 AM
Hilltopper Hilltopper is offline
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Mazzarine33 when my ducks get into my garden they are menaces too, banana leafs, kale beet tops, lettuce, spinach devoured like locusts . From what I have read if you say plant things like a patch of potatoes , where the ducks have access, they are good at getting rid of slugs and geese are weeders but you cannot let them into the general garden from my experience either . That is why I am planning to grow my potatoes in my orchard eventually in rotating plots , where ducks and geese will have access and there is a small pong I will develop in a few years when I can . I am forgetting, there are few more crops you can rotate them into , like corn once it is already maturing in stalk height , and a few other things .
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Old 02-02-2020, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Freja View Post
Did you do anything special on the terraces to keep the water in place like French drains or???
I’ve been watching U-tube until I’m practically catatonic and still haven’t found any information that makes me feel like I’m ready to get started on a “practical & functional” project.
On my terraces I made them about 6 feet wide running the tiller on the upper side a couple times and then one time next lower bit and rake out and repeat etc.

I designed mine so that the back of the terrace was lower than the front of the terrace "sloped back". Then I dug a small ditch on the back of the terrace to guide water through if it rained heavily. So I ended up with about an 8 inch wide by 6 inch deep ditch at the back of terrace with a slight up slope over the next just over five feet. I left the back 16 inches of the terrace open for a walking path and planted on the front 4 1/2 feet of the terraces. The front of the terrace was about 4 inches higher than the back of the terraces.

At the ends of the terraces where it began a new row I curved the ditch around and down to the next row headed back the other direction. We do not get a lot of rain at any one given time here so that worked well for me. In a rainier climate you might have to do a bit more for water control.
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Old 02-03-2020, 02:04 PM
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I have four 4'x20', two 1'x20', and 1 4'x80' foot raised beds. Two of the 4'x20' beds have a 8ft T-Post trellis that run the length of them. 80% of it is composed of sawdust and sand with a ratio or about 3:1 sawdust, the rest is compost, ashes, peat-moss. PVC pipe irrigation running the length of the beds, similar to many mittleider gardening videos.

This year i'll grow about 80 tomato plants. 50 Opalka for canning the rest being black beauty, brad's atomic grape, barry's crazy cherry, black cherry, solar flare, and cherokee purple. I do red potatoes, Beauregard sweet potatoes, some black beauty zuchinni, and lemon squash. Probably some more stuff i'm forgetting.

Brand new this year we will be trying Luffa, mammoth sunflowers, flour corn and china jade cucumbers.
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Old 02-06-2020, 04:18 PM
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This year I'm adding Jerusalem artichokes but I haven't figured out yet where to put them. Probably in several spots around the place.

There are a few more things I want to try in the never ending battle with root knot nematodes.
If you have a spot with clay...
In my previous garden... I grew good sun chokes... Here in the sand? Poor, poor, poor.

I don't know if it's the nematodes or what... where I had a decent stand... leaving them too long, resulted in rotted tubers... and when I potted some up in sand in a planter... they rotted.

I found a pdf file that suggested using walnut husks to foil nematodes...

At my house... they are so bad that I get to garden 2 or three years in a spot... and then clear room for another garden, and plant trees in the previous spot... the veggies... simply refuse to grow... plenty of compost... some things grow in the old spot, but... not food.

This winter digging up new beds... I found poke weed that had root knot nematodes... Before I've even planted anything!

My pink flowered snow peas have finally emerged through the sand... the late planted kale, turnips, and rutabagas... still aren't large enough to eat... but soon, I hope...
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Old 02-06-2020, 05:32 PM
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Starting my leeks today, next week I will be starting my cabbages and Brussels sprouts...

I think I may try some milk jug green housing this year to get an early start outside on my leeks. Do the first three weeks indoors and move out to the covered porch for the next 5 weeks and then to the soil under the trees on the south side with the milk jug left in place atop for the next 3 or 4 weeks or so. That would put me pulling off the milk jugs around mid to late April or so. I might have to do another cover for a while to make sure they don't get too cold in May, but by the end of May for sure I should be safe to have them uncovered.

Has anyone ever had leeks exposed to temps in the low 20's or teens? Do they survive alright or do they have to restart after that? Everything I can find on growing winter leeks is in the UK and they do not actually have a real winter, not like north Idaho anyways..
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Old 02-06-2020, 10:04 PM
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Originally Posted by st0n3 View Post
If you have a spot with clay...
In my previous garden... I grew good sun chokes... Here in the sand? Poor, poor, poor.
Thank you for that as I've never grown these before. The soil varies around this place. In one spot it can be sandy way down and 10' away you hit clay 6" down. This whole region is laced with clay ( kaolin mines) so I'll just have to dig some test holes before the tubers get here.

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I found a pdf file that suggested using walnut husks to foil nematodes...
With all the bad press walnuts get for harming gardens with jugalone, I'm surprised at that. Black or regular walnuts?

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Originally Posted by st0n3 View Post
This winter digging up new beds... I found poke weed that had root knot nematodes... Before I've even planted anything!
You have poke weed growing now? Or are those old dead plants left over from summer? Right now my soil temps are about 50-55. Nematodes don't wake up and get going until 65 so unless these upcoming warm temps trigger them, you should be OK putting in winter type stuff.

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My pink flowered snow peas have finally emerged through the sand... the late planted kale, turnips, and rutabagas... still aren't large enough to eat... but soon, I hope...
I really hope they do well for you. They should if cooler weather holds.
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Old 02-07-2020, 09:02 AM
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These snow peas grew fine last year...

Poke is perennial... the roots are still alive...
and.... lots of poke seedlings coming up in that new bed...

I suggest searching plants that grow in the presence of black walnut... you will find that the list of plants that like black walnut is going to be three or four times as long as the plants that don't like them!

But... Yeah... was black walnut... and... apparently olives too!

I've tried planting datura in the beds that won't grow vegetables any more... get pretty moonflowers... but really need jimpsonweed seeds for that purpose....

Seems like some annual datura would be better for turning under.

I've read that you can graft tomatoes to datura rootstocks in the presence of nematodes... but... some sources suggest that you might get high off those maters! other papers make no mention of that issue.
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Old 02-07-2020, 11:30 AM
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I have a 20' x 8' plot but get a lot of hot peppers out of it. This year adding pickle cukes which will be on a trellis. I need new wood for a border so I'm going to make it deeper and add fresh soil to it, negotiating with a friend for some horse poop that I can lay on top of it for now.
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Old 02-07-2020, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Iamfarticus View Post
I have a 20' x 8' plot but get a lot of hot peppers out of it. This year adding pickle cukes which will be on a trellis. I need new wood for a border so I'm going to make it deeper and add fresh soil to it, negotiating with a friend for some horse poop that I can lay on top of it for now.
Just be careful how hot the horse manure is, 2 years old or more you are good. If it is this years manure you might be careful to keep it a bit away from plants.
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Old 02-07-2020, 06:30 PM
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The drought we've been experiencing in our area of OZ, (Australia, not the Ozarks), destroyed our mandala garden and as it's nearly the end of summer we're replacing it with raised beds. We're using commercially made raised beds produced by Birdies.

I've only got four beds finished so far but eventually there will be 12 beds each 4' x 8' x 3' high and another 8 beds that are only 20" high. It'd take a lot of soil to fill them however I'm filling them half way with logs and wood-chips, sort of like a hugelkulture system.
(A neighbour was clearing his property and we managed to score enough logs to do all the beds.)

Next door neighbour said he'd found a source of horse poop that we could have so we went and got six trailer loads. The lady who owns quite few of the four legged factories that produce the stuff offered it to anyone who wanted it FREE, but as whoever needed it had to bring a shovel she's had no takers. She adds about three wheel-barrow loads every day to the pile and was really happy that my neighbour and I will be taking it away on a regular basis. (We decided to get a good worm-farm going.)

I had four big truckloads of free wood-chips delivered three years ago and they've composted down to the point where, after being passed through the rotary sieve I built, the fines are used to add vegetable matter to the crap "garden soil" that was delivered by a local landscaping company.

It's going to take some time to do as Mrs Bid has a long Honey Do list that also has to be attended to.
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Old 02-08-2020, 06:42 AM
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If you have a spot with clay...
In my previous garden... I grew good sun chokes... Here in the sand? Poor, poor, poor.

.
If you have a cat you can put the litter on the garden to add clay. I make sure the wife buys the unadulterated clay type. I have been spreading it on my pretty sandy soil for several years now. At first I noticed quite an improvement, now not so much. I'll keep adding it for a few more years until I get a more loamy soil and then start spreading it on my grassy areas.
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Old 02-09-2020, 08:00 AM
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Old 02-09-2020, 08:05 AM
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Iím wanting to try black beans but seem to have trouble finding seed. Thinking Iíll just get a bag of them in the grocery aisle and plant those. Any thoughts?
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Old 02-09-2020, 08:09 AM
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Iím wanting to try black beans but seem to have trouble finding seed. Thinking Iíll just get a bag of them in the grocery aisle and plant those. Any thoughts?
been there done it......

works
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Old 02-09-2020, 10:55 AM
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I’m wanting to try black beans but seem to have trouble finding seed. Thinking I’ll just get a bag of them in the grocery aisle and plant those. Any thoughts?
A good portion of my bean stock is from bulk beans sold at the store. I buy a small quantity of what I want to grow and do a test germination and then do a test planting if the germination works out. I have yet to be disappointed. Beans, lentils, mung beans, great northern beans, black beans, black eyed peas, pinto beans, kidney beans, soy beans, canola, garbanzo peas etc.

I even plant some raw whole kernel wheat bought in bulk at the local Winco. In the past I have boughten bulk feed barley, oats, corn and sunflower and used those for planting as well. I commonly buy a 25# or 50# bag of blackoil sunflower seed and then I lightly disc (till) an area of field and broadcast the sunflower seed out into it and I get a small field of pretty bright yellow sunflower plants on the cheap. I have never actually tried to harvest them I have just always let them grow and later used as a treat for the goats in the late summer and fall. They are also good at keeping goats and deer distracted from a garden.
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Old 02-09-2020, 11:09 AM
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We've tried to plant many things, most with failure or a tiny bit of success. I assume it is our 7,500 feet elevation and all the property in heavily covered Pine Trees.

Last year was our first success story with Chili Peppers.

I know we need a little green house to start plants, but just haven't completed that project yet.


......
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Old 02-09-2020, 11:27 AM
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Just started putting seeds in containers indoors to plant out in a month or so. Will work on getting the greenhouse ready to plant stuff next. We need to get everything ready and planted what we can with the weather before the goat kids and lambs are due next month.

Need to get garden tilled. We have 2 huge garden areas, and sell at the farmers market. Things that grow well here: any sort of greens like Kale, lettuce, spinach, cabbage. Zuchini and squash, cucumbers, pumpkins, beans, tomatoes. Things that need a lot of heat or sandy soil generally don't grow as well. Tried eggplant and fennel before and they don't do as well. Peppers don't get ripe until late fall. Sweet potatoes that I always grew in Florida don't seem to work here at all. I can't grow broccoli grrrrr, they only grow leaves, or a tiny head, no matter what I do

Debating on potatoes. They don';t sell well at the market and are a real pain to dig up. Didn't plant any last year but thinking we might plant some again this year
They do grow well here
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Old 02-09-2020, 01:07 PM
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My garden gets too much shade for the good stuff. I'll be going with Asparagus and lettuce.
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Old 02-09-2020, 01:15 PM
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I can't grow broccoli grrrrr, they only grow leaves, or a tiny head, no matter what I do.
Hmmm... what varieties have you tried and when do you plant them out into the garden? I ask because not all varieties have worked for me, including some that others have said grow big heads for them. But not for me!
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Old 02-09-2020, 01:20 PM
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We've tried to plant many things, most with failure or a tiny bit of success. I assume it is our 7,500 feet elevation and all the property in heavily covered Pine Trees.

Last year was our first success story with Chili Peppers.

I know we need a little green house to start plants, but just haven't completed that project yet.


......
That is up there, I live at 3,000 feet in northern Idaho and it is quite a trick planting a garden here most years. Two years ago all was great and then we had 12 days of temps in the low 20's the last week of June and first week of July and that was all she wrote. I still managed to get potatoes and a few other things that survived well enough but that kind of takes the heart right out of you after all that work and everything going great and then wham...

You might have to try some things like I do, milk jug greenhouses to protect from frost, I also use some heavy gauge electric fence wire and bend up a small metal frame and cover it over with clear plastic garbage bags for protection as well. I also have a 20x60 foot greenhouse as well and a covered porch on the house with large south facing windows along the entire southern wall for helping start plants. You might have to do some things like that to overcome your elevation and weather.
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