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Old 02-16-2010, 09:29 PM
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I alter between long grain rice and a smaller amounts of potato flakes for diversity as the two main staples. I also add vaccum packs of lima beans, black eyes, red beans, etc... I also add packets of powdered McCormick brown, onion or cream gravies to moisten it all up... if mix a pile of rice with gravy and beans, it will fill you up fine....add the nutrition pills and you can make it a long long time... I vacuum seal all of it in 1 week allocations .....

all you need is good clean water and a method of boiling... my two cents anyway.... good luck
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Old 11-10-2018, 01:53 PM
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old thread

most on this site do NOT advocate ramen for long-term storage.

if one is planning on long-term non-processed corn, consider nixtamalization
this will make the corn easier to digest and improve the nutrition.

most of the corn-based food we see (tortillas, corn meal, grits) has gone through this.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixtamalization

(edit; internet says one can use baking soda to nixtamilize. anyone heard of?)

bulk corn can be ridiculously cheap and available (watch for chemically treated for bugs etc), stores easy, and can be ground at home.

Last edited by Sailorsam; 11-10-2018 at 02:00 PM.. Reason: add line
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Old 11-10-2018, 03:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Sailorsam View Post
old thread

most on this site do NOT advocate ramen for long-term storage.

if one is planning on long-term non-processed corn, consider nixtamalization
this will make the corn easier to digest and improve the nutrition.

most of the corn-based food we see (tortillas, corn meal, grits) has gone through this.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixtamalization

(edit; internet says one can use baking soda to nixtamilize. anyone heard of?)

bulk corn can be ridiculously cheap and available (watch for chemically treated for bugs etc), stores easy, and can be ground at home.
You can use a number of different alkalies to nixtamalize, even lye. But the process is a little different for each one. For example, the lye process which is how I originally learned, takes a LOT of boiling and rinsing to make it edible. I haven't tried using baking soda, but it seems it would take a long longer to convert the corn since it's a fairly mild alkali.
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Old 11-10-2018, 05:04 PM
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You can use a number of different alkalies to nixtamalize, even lye. But the process is a little different for each one. For example, the lye process which is how I originally learned, takes a LOT of boiling and rinsing to make it edible. I haven't tried using baking soda, but it seems it would take a long longer to convert the corn since it's a fairly mild alkali.
so you've nixtamilized yourself? care to post / thread about it? would like to try myself.
maybe I should start a thread asking about.
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Old 11-11-2018, 06:22 AM
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https://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/u...thout_lye.html
I haven't tried it yet.

"Hominy without Lye
Preparing Hominy — Prepare hominy in a well ventilated room. Use 2 Tablespoons of baking soda to 2 quarts of water for 1 quart of dry field corn; you can double the recipe if your stainless steel pot is large enough. Add the baking soda to the water; bring to a boil while stirring to dissolve the baking soda. Then add the dry field corn, stirring continuously to prevent sticking. Boil vigorously for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Then allow to stand for 20 minutes. Rinse off the baking soda solution with several changes of hot water. Follow with cold water rinses to cool for handling. It is very important to rinse the corn thoroughly.

Work hominy with hands under running water until the dark tips of kernels are loosened from the rest of the kernel. (When working the hulls to remove the dark tips, do so under running water in a colander so the shelled kernels have little contact with the remaining unshelled corn with hulls that still have baking soda solution on them.) Separate the tips from the corn by placing the corn in a coarse sieve and rinsing thoroughly.

Hot Pack—Add sufficient water to cover the hominy by about 1 inch. Boil 5 minutes and change the water. Repeat this process with clean water each time for 4 more times. In fresh water again, cook the rinsed kernels until the kernels are soft (30 to 45 minutes) and drain. ..."
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Old 11-12-2018, 08:14 AM
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Old thread but I'll chime in.

A mixture of foods is best. Some higher quality meals to keep moral up such as Legacy and Mountain House. Some filler items like bulk pastas, and a lot of less expensive foods such as rice and corn. Be sure to stock a lot of spices.

But I disagree with only planning on 1350 calories per day. I think 2000 calories per day is a better choice. You need to be strong and active; 1350 calories per day won't do that for most people.
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Old 11-12-2018, 11:37 PM
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I like Ramen but would rather be dead in a shtf scenario than eat that for a year!

As for food bars (26-3600 cal bars) I keep those for bug out or if bug in then recon missions.

I like to buy pre packaged 30 day supply buckets. Each one has variety, breakfast lunch and dinner with drink mixes. Easy to grab a few if bugging out via vehicle (maybe one if on foot). 25 year shelf life! Easily extend a bucket by adding rice/beans to meals.

30 day buckets is the best option. If the world is collapsing at least you can eat.
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Old 11-13-2018, 12:20 AM
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I like to buy pre packaged 30 day supply buckets. Each one has variety, breakfast lunch and dinner with drink mixes. Easy to grab a few if bugging out via vehicle (maybe one if on foot). 25 year shelf life! Easily extend a bucket by adding rice/beans to meals.

30 day buckets is the best option. If the world is collapsing at least you can eat.
better check what your buying.
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Old 11-13-2018, 08:46 PM
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m no expert but methinks the buckets are high convenience but high price?

wish I had an LDS place near me
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Old 11-14-2018, 09:19 AM
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The survival buckets are costly compared to Ramen. That’s why I don’t have a huge supply. BJ’s or Costco sell them. I think a deluxe 30 day bucket (1850 calories a day) is $80 at BJ’s.

I like the fact that I can buy them and forget about them. No need to date, rotate stock etc.

I think buying one every few months is reasonable for most budgets. In two years a person has a 6 month supply.

FYI, I’d rather live off Kraft Mac n Cheese over Ramen.

I keep a mix of stuff. Buckets, Ramen and Mac n Cheese. Peanut Butter etc.

For long term you need variety.
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Old 11-14-2018, 01:31 PM
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To they guy who asked about nixtamilization of corn. I do it with lime. I buy type S lime in 50 pound sacks from the hardware store for about $7 (I also use it to make white wash, lime on the garden, absorb smell if compost pile gets bad, waterproofing/fireproofing fabric and could be used to make mortar)

Very rough measurements here, but in a stainless pan I put about a gallon and a half of cold water, 3 or 4 pounds of corn and a half cup of lime. Then I very slowly heat the corn up to a very low simmer. Once it gets hot the corn should turn extremely yellow. I keep it on a very low simmer until some of the shells start to come off(if the corn is fresh this can be 20 minutes, if it is a couple years old it can be a couple hours) Once there is the first hint of the shells coming off, I take it off the heat, put a lid on it let it cool naturally. The next day I dump it into a colander and scrub the hulls off with my hands under running water.

If you don't have enough lime the corn may burst before the shells come off, Once that happens in my opinion it can only really be used for something where it is ground(tortillas or chips or thickener) or in soup.

As far as taste goes, if you ever have eaten an unsalted, unflavored corn chip the somewhat bitter aftertaste is what this tastes like. If you aren't used to it it may not be so good but I love it.
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Old 11-15-2018, 04:03 AM
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Grits, cornmeal, olive oil do not keep. I very recently had to throw away several mylar packages of grits and cornmeal. Also, a couple of bottles of olive oil and freeze dried bacon bits from Auguson Farms. All turned rancid.
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Old 11-15-2018, 12:00 PM
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I would match that with canned fatty fish. You will need the omegas. Also id start training your body to run off fat fuel (keto) and intermittant fasting. Your calorie requirements will drop drastically and plus not to mention its way healthier .
You will still want to stock carbs (beans &rice) due to being more cost effective.
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Old 11-18-2018, 09:42 PM
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Harmony House Foods has a lot of great dehydrated food options for long-term storage. They even are having a half off inventory sale today. Not a bad option for folks who aren't into or know how to dehydrate things they grow.
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Old 11-18-2018, 09:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunnibeez View Post
Grits, cornmeal, olive oil do not keep. I very recently had to throw away several mylar packages of grits and cornmeal. Also, a couple of bottles of olive oil and freeze dried bacon bits from Auguson Farms. All turned rancid.
How long are you talking? Degerminated cornmeal has a shelf life of 2-3 years though whole cornmeal keeps much less, in fact should be in fridge or freezer. Whole cornmeal tastes much better though i do keep jiffy around.
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