Survey; Millenials lack Survival Skills - Page 6 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Disaster Preparedness General Discussion Anything Disaster Preparedness or Survival Related

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Building A Prepping Library AllOutdoor.com AllOutdoor.com 5 02-01-2018 07:19 PM
Survival Formlua for success Black Knight Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 18 01-19-2017 08:24 AM
Free Book: Nuclear War Survival Skills gotjunk Books, Movies & Stories 2 10-25-2016 02:41 PM
Suggestions for self learning Revmgt General Discussion 23 10-17-2016 06:54 PM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-02-2017, 10:37 AM
Optimist Optimist is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 13,303
Thanks: 41,729
Thanked 17,905 Times in 7,963 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

Compass works when the gps is down.
Cleaning a rabbit if you don't know the pitfalls can give you tularemia, which can be fatal, and often will leave significant afteraffects even if you live through it....

Knowledge ain't always power, but it is usually safer than ignorance....
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Optimist For This Useful Post:
Old 02-03-2017, 08:30 AM
TacticalFarmer TacticalFarmer is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 914
Thanks: 1,271
Thanked 1,169 Times in 465 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ppine View Post
I would say a lot of them lack life skills. That is why so many of them live at home.
Explains why such a high percentage of them are democrats too
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to TacticalFarmer For This Useful Post:
Old 02-03-2017, 08:45 AM
David Bevis's Avatar
David Bevis David Bevis is offline
IDon'tBelieveInGiraffes.
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: North Carolina
Age: 20
Posts: 430
Thanks: 5,631
Thanked 582 Times in 251 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tedlovesjeeps71 View Post
I remember when my father passed away back in the early 90s, I was pressed into going through some of his things. I recall flipping through his copy of the boy scout handbook he grew up with. I then (later) compared it to the BS handbook I used on my way to Eagle Scout. It was different but still very similar.
I can only wonder what a current copy made in the last 10 years must look like.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
It looks like a joke is what it looks like. I couldn't care less for the Boy Scouts honestly, I don't believe they are doing their job. I was in before they started the equality thing so I know that isn't what made it bad for me, I just didn't get taught anything hardly. The leaders in my troop sat around and just wanted to gossip like a bunch of teenage girls and half of them hadn't slept without AC and heat in the last 30 years, much less slept outside.

When I heard them talking crap about my father, who tried to go to every camping trip and be a part of every function, because he had to stay at home and work on my mothers truck I decided I was done.

I learned more from my Agricultural Mechanics teacher and my Automotive Paint & Body/Restoration teachers about the Scout type things than I did from the actual scout troops.

I honestly blame the BSA for part of the reason my generation doesn't know anything important other than how to SnapChat and have kids at 15. They never put any attempt into trying to teach us the things that previous generations have been taught.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to David Bevis For This Useful Post:
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-03-2017, 02:02 PM
GG42 GG42 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 5,121
Thanks: 1,043
Thanked 3,153 Times in 1,899 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Optimist View Post
Compass works when the gps is down.
Cleaning a rabbit if you don't know the pitfalls can give you tularemia, which can be fatal, and often will leave significant afteraffects even if you live through it....

Knowledge ain't always power, but it is usually safer than ignorance....
Well, lets look closer:
Case one: a resident of a small western town (pop. 400) is trying to bug out to his folks farm 50 miles away (on foot). It is prudent for him to have SOME outdoor skills, even if he won't need them.
Case two: a guy is trying to escape NYC. Just to leave the city limits would take him two weeks (if he is lucky). He would need more skills than a small town dweller, but none of them the type of skills dicussed here.
Now, for every man in Case one there are 100 men fitting the Case two (possibly, a thousand). So the outdoor skills discussed do not apply to 99% of people (possibly, to 99.9%).
But wait, there is more: people must work, have all kinds of other obligations. The amount of time, energy and money is strictly limited. So the choice is not between learning outdoor skills and the ignorance. The real choice is about learning skills he doesn't need and skills that he needs badly. If he decides to learn the first he can't learn the second. And will die. He can't learn both: to execute a successful bug out from a metropolitan area is extremely difficult. In fact, next to impossible. If he spend all his time to learn RELEVANT skills, he is unlikely to succeed. But if he doesn't, he would,likely, not make 10 feet out of his apartment.

And there is even more to the story: even in a Case one, the discussed skills are not anywhere near the top of importance. The number one skills for anyone, anywhere are analytical skills. What, exactly would be the most important for his survival? How to go about it, exactly? The second most important skill is ability to plan things on the nuts and bolts level (and test those plans, repeatably). Stealth moving. Get accustom to sounds in the forest. Train his intuition. If he is going to walk 50 miles, it would take a week, likely. He can carry the food, no need to catch the rabbits. But how can he make sure he is not killed in his sleep, during his seven nights? Just this last issue might make months to resolve satisfactorily. Dealing with predators, not just ambushes. And on and on.
Quick reply to this message
Old 02-03-2017, 02:22 PM
MickeyCJS MickeyCJS is offline
The Mom
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: CT
Posts: 1,163
Thanks: 2,462
Thanked 2,760 Times in 823 Posts
Default

What's a millennial anyway? Is there a certain age bracket? I just turned 28, am I one?

I wish I was brought up by outdoorsy folks. My mom's not the type to break a sweat and my dad was always either working or playing on one of 3 softball teams. He did like to fish though, and took me a few times.

I did a lot of playing in the woods as a kid, alone or with a friend or cousin. I practiced starting fires and tried to build forts. Thank god I never burned down the woods... And I will give my mom some credit now that I think about it-- she didn't teach me how to cook, but she allowed me the freedom to teach myself. Again, thank god I never burned down the house lol.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to MickeyCJS For This Useful Post:
Old 02-03-2017, 02:27 PM
tedlovesjeeps71's Avatar
tedlovesjeeps71 tedlovesjeeps71 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 14,421
Thanks: 10,251
Thanked 37,942 Times in 11,367 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Bevis View Post
It looks like a joke is what it looks like. I couldn't care less for the Boy Scouts honestly, I don't believe they are doing their job. I was in before they started the equality thing so I know that isn't what made it bad for me, I just didn't get taught anything hardly. The leaders in my troop sat around and just wanted to gossip like a bunch of teenage girls and half of them hadn't slept without AC and heat in the last 30 years, much less slept outside.



When I heard them talking crap about my father, who tried to go to every camping trip and be a part of every function, because he had to stay at home and work on my mothers truck I decided I was done.



I learned more from my Agricultural Mechanics teacher and my Automotive Paint & Body/Restoration teachers about the Scout type things than I did from the actual scout troops.



I honestly blame the BSA for part of the reason my generation doesn't know anything important other than how to SnapChat and have kids at 15. They never put any attempt into trying to teach us the things that previous generations have been taught.


From looking over your profile it looks like you're kinda young, like high school age? I hate to hear stories like your experience with the Scouts but it seems to be fairly common in today's world. I guess I was fortunate in that my time in Scouts started in the early 80s. Like you, I was on the east coast (N Georgia) but had the opposite experience. From cub Scouts until I made my Eagle Scout, I was lucky enough to have decent leadership and active troops. Not to mention supportive parents who made me go even when I hit those stages in life where I thought it was "lame". My only issue over the years was probably with the fact my BS troop was based out of a Catholic Church. When I was working on my Eagle I had to interview with a "Religious Leader". I had a sit down with one of the priests and felt somewhat blackmailed by him when it was over. He wanted to see me attend their church as a trade off for signing off on my requirement.
As far as the scouting aspect, I loved it. We had at least one weekend trip a month and several longer trips during the summer. I've hiked all of the lower half Appalachian trail, etc. Summer camps were pretty cool and we used actual rifles for shooting.
I'm sad to hear it has fallen so far away from its roots but can't say I'm surprised. It takes several things to create a successful scout program. Active and interested kids AND their parents.
Dedicated leaders in the troop with quality skills.
And a willingness for all to put aside much of our modern technology (i.e. Phones/'tvs/etc) and get back to the simple life.
That last one I blame as much as anything for the downward slide of scouting. Unfortunately, as technology takes over more of the lives of people, I foresee it becoming worse until such things as scouting are banished to but a footnote in history.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to tedlovesjeeps71 For This Useful Post:
Old 02-03-2017, 02:39 PM
tedlovesjeeps71's Avatar
tedlovesjeeps71 tedlovesjeeps71 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 14,421
Thanks: 10,251
Thanked 37,942 Times in 11,367 Posts
Default

I'm currently in school for automotive technology. I wanted to offset my decades of self taught automotive skills by learning what "professionals" know. My class is a strange mixture of young and old, lots of military vets, and some folks who have made some bad decisions in life but are trying to turn things around. One young vet, a Marine, is a blatant millennial. Skinny jeans, scruffy faux beard, pink shoes... etc. He's not a bad kid, just young and very nerdy. What's interesting to me is how he has zero skills in some things but others he rolls through like water. Kid can't tell a 1/4" ratchet from a 1/2" one but has already reconfigured his college issued laptop to run some other operating system. Pretty much my polar opposite. Haha.
I mention it only because this seems to be fairly common. Our youngsters are light years ahead of some of us when it comes to technology, especially computers. But when it comes to basic, blue collar skills(?) they seem to be completely lost.
I'm not bashing the youngsters, just making an observation. At twice this kids age I have somewhat of an advantage. But I have no doubt that when we move on to the computer aspects of automotive diagnostic stuff... he will leave me in the dust.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to tedlovesjeeps71 For This Useful Post:
Old 02-04-2017, 05:09 AM
David Bevis's Avatar
David Bevis David Bevis is offline
IDon'tBelieveInGiraffes.
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: North Carolina
Age: 20
Posts: 430
Thanks: 5,631
Thanked 582 Times in 251 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tedlovesjeeps71 View Post
From looking over your profile it looks like you're kinda young, like high school age? I hate to hear stories like your experience with the Scouts but it seems to be fairly common in today's world. I guess I was fortunate in that my time in Scouts started in the early 80s. Like you, I was on the east coast (N Georgia) but had the opposite experience. From cub Scouts until I made my Eagle Scout, I was lucky enough to have decent leadership and active troops. Not to mention supportive parents who made me go even when I hit those stages in life where I thought it was "lame". My only issue over the years was probably with the fact my BS troop was based out of a Catholic Church. When I was working on my Eagle I had to interview with a "Religious Leader". I had a sit down with one of the priests and felt somewhat blackmailed by him when it was over. He wanted to see me attend their church as a trade off for signing off on my requirement.
As far as the scouting aspect, I loved it. We had at least one weekend trip a month and several longer trips during the summer. I've hiked all of the lower half Appalachian trail, etc. Summer camps were pretty cool and we used actual rifles for shooting.
I'm sad to hear it has fallen so far away from its roots but can't say I'm surprised. It takes several things to create a successful scout program. Active and interested kids AND their parents.
Dedicated leaders in the troop with quality skills.
And a willingness for all to put aside much of our modern technology (i.e. Phones/'tvs/etc) and get back to the simple life.
That last one I blame as much as anything for the downward slide of scouting. Unfortunately, as technology takes over more of the lives of people, I foresee it becoming worse until such things as scouting are banished to but a footnote in history.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Yes sir, I'm a Junior in high school, Should be a Senior, but that Freshman year thing is so fun sometimes you have to try it a second time

One of my main problems growing up was that a lot of the outdoorsmen mentality isn't as common as it used to be, so I felt different when I had an interest for it. Not that it bothered me to feel different, I've always tried to go my own path and be somewhat of a leader, but I can see where some kids don't want to be a part of it because they feel different.

Almost my entire Agricultural Mechanics class is filled with people who hunt, fish, farm, build their own tools, and work on their own things. I respect that type of person a lot, and you don't see many of them anymore.

I'm also taking an automotive course from 12:00 to 2:45 in addition to my normal high school classes, and I'm doing Paint & Body/Restoration. I enjoy doing things like that because it's awesome to see some old school 1950's truck that was rolled at some point be completely restored. I enjoy thing I can do with my hands, not stuff I need to sit at a desk and do because I just get way too bored sitting at a desk.

I had a cell phone at one point, but I got tired of paying the bill for something that just sits in my pocket and decided that money would be better used for other things instead. That $45 card every month could have went towards buying my first handgun, or stocking the 100 rounds for $20 boxes of 12GA birdshot at WalMart for small game.

A lot of people my age have their priorities wrong and think hat their brand new chromes out Cummins their daddy bought them is more important than knowing how to hunt, fish, build a fire, and build shelter. Thankfully though, it's not all of us and a surprisingly large portion of us are interested.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to David Bevis For This Useful Post:
Old 02-06-2017, 06:52 PM
ACA1001 ACA1001 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 177
Thanks: 54
Thanked 178 Times in 79 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jlrhiner View Post
Default Survey; Millenials lack Survival Skills
And reasoning skills, and social skills, and work ethics, and responsibility, taste in clothing and some hygiene issues.
Did I miss anything?
Yes, physical fitness
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to ACA1001 For This Useful Post:
Old 02-06-2017, 06:54 PM
ACA1001 ACA1001 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 177
Thanks: 54
Thanked 178 Times in 79 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tedlovesjeeps71 View Post
I'm currently in school for automotive technology. I wanted to offset my decades of self taught automotive skills by learning what "professionals" know. My class is a strange mixture of young and old, lots of military vets, and some folks who have made some bad decisions in life but are trying to turn things around. One young vet, a Marine, is a blatant millennial. Skinny jeans, scruffy faux beard, pink shoes... etc. He's not a bad kid, just young and very nerdy. What's interesting to me is how he has zero skills in some things but others he rolls through like water. Kid can't tell a 1/4" ratchet from a 1/2" one but has already reconfigured his college issued laptop to run some other operating system. Pretty much my polar opposite. Haha.
I mention it only because this seems to be fairly common. Our youngsters are light years ahead of some of us when it comes to technology, especially computers. But when it comes to basic, blue collar skills(?) they seem to be completely lost.
I'm not bashing the youngsters, just making an observation. At twice this kids age I have somewhat of an advantage. But I have no doubt that when we move on to the computer aspects of automotive diagnostic stuff... he will leave me in the dust.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
"Technically"-speaking, they are not ahead in terms of technology, just different types of technology, as knowing automotive mechanics, woodworking, plumbing, electrical skills, etc...is all technology too.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ACA1001 For This Useful Post:
Old 02-06-2017, 06:56 PM
ACA1001 ACA1001 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 177
Thanks: 54
Thanked 178 Times in 79 Posts
Default

Millennial here too. I am in school to become a machinist, but I am going to buy a manual lathe and mill when I get enough $$$ to work with at home and become skilled at manual machining. I figure that will be an excellent SHTF skill and also I like it. We trained with manual lathes and mills for the first semester, now we're doing CNC, but pretty much all the professional machine shops today are CNC. Some (maybe many?) of the guys in the shop I work have never run a manual lathe or mill.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to ACA1001 For This Useful Post:
Old 02-06-2017, 07:14 PM
IceFire's Avatar
IceFire IceFire is offline
I have control issues
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Southeast AZ
Posts: 5,002
Thanks: 5,055
Thanked 6,624 Times in 2,750 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Gardening Post or Thread 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Bevis View Post
Almost my entire Agricultural Mechanics class is filled with people who hunt, fish, farm, build their own tools, and work on their own things. I respect that type of person a lot, and you don't see many of them anymore.
Cultivate friendships with those "Ag" types, show interest in those types of things they do, (hunting, fishing, farming, etc.) and ask if they would be willing to teach you. Chances are, they will (especially if you're willing to go out and share the WORK!)
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to IceFire For This Useful Post:
Old 02-07-2017, 07:33 AM
MickeyCJS MickeyCJS is offline
The Mom
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: CT
Posts: 1,163
Thanks: 2,462
Thanked 2,760 Times in 823 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Optimist View Post
Compass works when the gps is down.
Cleaning a rabbit if you don't know the pitfalls can give you tularemia, which can be fatal, and often will leave significant afteraffects even if you live through it....

Knowledge ain't always power, but it is usually safer than ignorance....
Thanks for giving me something new to look up.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to MickeyCJS For This Useful Post:
Old 02-07-2017, 10:01 PM
Jlrhiner's Avatar
Jlrhiner Jlrhiner is offline
Curmudgeon
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Arnold, Missouri
Age: 61
Posts: 1,240
Thanks: 2,386
Thanked 2,898 Times in 869 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ACA1001 View Post
Yes, physical fitness
Yep, they invented it. It didn't exist before.
Quick reply to this message
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
generation gap, millenials, prepping, survival skills



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net