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Old 06-11-2019, 06:15 PM
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Learn to evaluate property before you buy it.

Just because the spouse thinks it's attractive doesn't mean squat. Investigate the land, the zoning laws, water/mineral rights, HOA rules, the taxes, the neighbors, building codes, the foundation, the drainage, the wall bones, the utilities, and literally everything before simply how it looks. The skin appearance is the easiest and cheapest part to fix. Any home flipper will tell you this. You can always get your home loan beefed up to do cosmetic changes.

Most of this effort in research costs nothing beyond a title search company and a home inspection engineer.

Better to do all that and tell the spouse they have some cash to make it look more attractive when you move in.
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Old 06-12-2019, 06:55 AM
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WHAT I was wondering was what kind of prepper bag or kit do you have/would you change to provide for your needs that would be different from the zombie apoc or asteroid inbound?

Seems like it would require a different grab and go and what do you change or what will you do different for a "next time"?
Different assets on standby...
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Old 06-12-2019, 07:10 AM
PurpleKitty PurpleKitty is offline
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I live not far from a bayou. Bought the house before I got medicated and dumb enough to believe "our" agent who swore it never flooded. They redid the flood maps a couple years after we bought the house and we are in a flood plain.

Had to buy flood insurance for the mortgage, fine with that, it isn't cheap.

I try to keep electronics off the floor (mine, at least).

During Harvey I realized an important lesson, my husband the train wreck would likely drown if we got water in the house. So I bought him a boating vest - life preserver that zips up and is comfortable to wear. I can just put him in the vest and call it done. Cats are another problem but from what I have seen they can swim.

Speaking of the cats, they are all microchipped now so we will be reunited.
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Old 06-12-2019, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by NW GUY View Post
OH..I don't know about that.

I live in northern Mich at over 1900ft elevation and within a hundred feet of being the highest point in the county. I have no idea how much rain would have to come down to create a flood but it would have to be in the hundreds of inches , and the Great Lakes would have to raise at least 400-500 feet to back up rivers and streams to stop the drainage off the local hills.

Might get soggy but flood... if that happens I will be looking for an ark to slide by.
All it means is that there's a classification to put in the box when you want insurance or a.mortgage.

Not that there's any risk of flooding.
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Old 06-12-2019, 01:19 PM
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Don't buy/live in a floodplain
Have insurance even if you don't


If you just have to stay and you KNOW you are going to take on water at least get your vehicles, pets and livestock to higher ground.
s.
Having grown up in the swamp/hurricane zone of the gulf coast and having responded to hurricanes and floods in many capacities including as an insurance adjuster I do not agree.

I am not wasting my money on flood insurance.
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Old 06-12-2019, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by NW GUY View Post
Like Arkansas and Missouri and Texas, Louisiana etc

with all the flooding going on..

is there anything you could really do to prepare for that kind of water influx?

In hindsight, what would you suggest or plan to do differently for "the next time"?
I'd build a houseboat: every building, even the barn, would be mounted on top of a barge that would float if the land were flooded.

That would, of course, mean maintaining flexible water/sewer/electric feeds: a small price to pay for living where you work.

William Warren
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Old 06-13-2019, 02:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NW GUY View Post
WHAT I was wondering was what kind of prepper bag or kit do you have/would you change to provide for your needs that would be different from the zombie apoc or asteroid inbound?

Seems like it would require a different grab and go and what do you change or what will you do different for a "next time"?
Different assets on standby...
I have an inflatable boat with a 400lb weight capacity, a paddle, and both battery powered and foot air pumps. This allows me to cross flooded land (but not a raging river). Other than that, it's all the same.
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Old 06-13-2019, 07:25 AM
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When I lived in the Mountains at 4,500 foot elevation you could get local flooding.
I am at 1,240 foot elevation now and there is flooding in the area.
I am on top of a hill near a creek bed that generally dies not have any significant water
But I would hate to be close to that creek bed when there is flash flooding
Regardless, the notion that mere elevation equates with no flooding is nonsense
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Old 06-13-2019, 06:58 PM
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My house is in a 500 year flood plane. The house did not flood, but most of the yard did during Harvey. One thing I noticed talking with acquaintances, folks with insurance were at the whim of their insurance. Seemed like those without got a better deal from FEMA.

All I can do at this point is attempt to procure a BOL further inland and at higher elevation. We are storing water and food, but that could be made usless if the flooding is bad enough. We have livestock (horses, chickens, dogs, a cat and several exotic birds) which makes a BOL difficult (and expensive).

Next house I buy, I will be smarter when it comes to flood maps and elevations, if there is a next one. (Mrs thinks there will be another, but I think we are stuck were we are due to our age and finances) For now, make the best of it is the best I can do.
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Old 06-14-2019, 09:23 PM
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I learned about flooded houses in the mid 70s helping other people clean up their houses. Ever since I have been very careful when selecting a living site. Have seen some mighty floods but am high enough to avoid the floods.

By the way, don't move here, it floods....
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Old 07-06-2019, 06:06 PM
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Nomad, 2nd,
Glad I didn’t take your advice. I built a home in Covington, LA 26 years ago. It is an Acadian style and raised 3.5 ft off the ground. The property is a across from the Bogue Falaya River and had never gotten water. In 2016, Water crossed over the road and under my home flooding my 5 year old renovated HVAC system. I had carried flood insurance all those years and had to replace all ductwork, 2 heating systems located under the house and 3 units. It was a $50K claim! The flood insurance covered my claim 100%. Luckily, no water in the house itself and my closed cell spray foam under the entire house protected the subfloor from any moisture. I have that type of savings but if I had to write that check myself, I would have spent out of pocket $85K on HVAC in five years. Talk about a financial hit! No thanks I will spend the $400 of premium for max coverage every year.
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Old 07-06-2019, 11:25 PM
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I have lived in Houston all my life, with the exception of a bit of time I spent in Austin going to school. So I have seen quite a bit in terms of flooding.

The house I grew up in was built in the county and later annexed by the city. We lived there almost 20 years with no flooding problems. Then, Tropical Storm Claudette rolled through and we had 5' of water in the house. This was a problem because my mom and my sister are only 5' tall. We flooded again two months later. TS Allison also got it, but my parents have moved on by then. The story then (and now) was that development changed the drainage in the water shed and rendered all the usual precautions meaningless.

The house I live in now was built in the early 60's, as was the rest of the neighborhood. Never flooded. Ever. Not one house. Then came Harvey, which set the record for single event rainfall in the US. None of the houses flooded. But some of the townhouses down closer to the bayou flooded over the tops of the cars. Not because of the rain, but because the US Army Corps of Engineers decided to dump the reservoirs into the bayou. We were all fine before then.

The moral of the two stories is high ground, flood plains, maps, history, all that jazz...won't stop a flood. Things change, and things happen that have never happened before and that you can't anticipate.

So sit there and lecture everyone about how to do it right, and sit there smug in your self-righteousness. All the advice is sound and worth heeding, just don't think you are really isolating yourself from this risk.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NW GUY View Post
WHAT I was wondering was what kind of prepper bag or kit do you have/would you change to provide for your needs that would be different from the zombie apoc or asteroid inbound?

Seems like it would require a different grab and go and what do you change or what will you do different for a "next time"?
Different assets on standby...
Really, not much difference. Here are some observations.

First thing I would do is urge you to keep anything you treasure or value up high and in waterproof containers. When we flooded in the house I grew up in, both times water came in the middle of the night. The first time it caught everybody by surprise since there had never been any flooding previously. We lost a lot of precious things, like family heirlooms, photographs, etc. because we hadn't prepared in that manner.

Second thing I would do is waterproof the contents of your bugout (GHB, etc.) bags. When they bring the john boat up to your window and you're trying to throw it in, you don't want it to be waterlogged. Especially if there are several of you. And there will undoubtedly be things in there that will be ruined by water and you don't want that to happen.

Third, PK raises a good point...if you have people who can't swim or aren't strong swimmers, make sure you have PFDs for them. My mother can't swim, my wife can't swim. I keep a PFD for my wife in case that happens. (She doesn't understand why I keep it around. She's not much of a prepper for some things.)

Fourth, consider getting some rubberized waders. We had a couple of people electrocuted in Harvey from downed power lines in the flood waters.

Fifth, keep copious amounts of sanitizer and cleaning supplies. In Claudette and Harvey, at least, wastewater treatment plants flooded and sewer lines back up. There was raw sewage everywhere in the flood waters.

Sixth, keep water in your BOB if you do not already. In Harvey, the municipal water supplies were contaminated. This happened in NO during Katrina, as well. Last thing you want is getting dehydrated in a flood because even usual sources of water may be unavailable.

Seventh, be prepared to hoof it as flooding quickly knocks out most forms of motorized transportation. This may have implications on your BOB including how you pack it (as mentioned above) to the kind of bag you use.

Eighth, learn to tell which snakes are venomous and which critters may pose a danger. For example, bats and skunks carry rabies.

Ninth, know the area. For example, during Harvey the bayou flooded local roadways when the Corps of Engineers literally opened the floodgates. Some of the roadways developed dangerous currents and filled freeway underpasses to 25'.

It's late, and that's all my stream of consciousness comes up with at the moment.
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Old 07-06-2019, 11:54 PM
Nomad, 2nd Nomad, 2nd is offline
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Nomad, 2nd,
Glad I didn’t take your advice. I built a home in Covington, LA 26 years ago. It is an Acadian style and raised 3.5 ft off the ground. The property is a across from the Bogue Falaya River and had never gotten water. In 2016, Water crossed over the road and under my home flooding my 5 year old renovated HVAC system. I had carried flood insurance all those years and had to replace all ductwork, 2 heating systems located under the house and 3 units. It was a $50K claim! The flood insurance covered my claim 100%. Luckily, no water in the house itself and my closed cell spray foam under the entire house protected the subfloor from any moisture. I have that type of savings but if I had to write that check myself, I would have spent out of pocket $85K on HVAC in five years. Talk about a financial hit! No thanks I will spend the $400 of premium for max coverage every year.

What advice? To have a House on piers in southern La? (3.5' aren't piers....BTW, Stop in at Bears and have a Po Boy for me.)

If I lived in Covington I'd have flood insurance.
My house is on top an Ozark mtn, there's no where for water to come down from except the sky, and it'll fall off the edge before it backs up into my house.

Flood insurance would be a waste of money.
I am insured against tornados though.


Read what I said, not what your trying to put into my mouth.


Also, your HVAC should be on piers too, at least as high as your floor.
Can't tell you how many claims I've written where that was the only thing flooded because idiots elevated their houses, but not their $10-$20k central unit.

Note: it may work if it drys out, but you can't get paid for it 2x. Dried my mothers out after Katrina (I was raised, but not as high as the floor) and it worked for years. But I had her bank the money vs spend it because if it flooded again she would get $0.
Finally died and the new one is on piers, not a raised platform.

BTW: you don't need lahar or volcano insurance.... Or do you pay for that anyway?
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Old 07-07-2019, 12:13 AM
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My area had 10" of rain in four hours before I purchased a building lot so I knew which areas flooded.
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Old 07-07-2019, 09:08 AM
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Nomad, 2nd,

why would the HVAC not be covered again under another flood event. it is considered part of the building. Is there some exclusion in the national flood policy pertaining to HVAC. If a home is flooded a second time with coverage the claim is paid.
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Old 07-07-2019, 09:26 AM
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We have not had a drop of rain in my area for about 6 months. Wildfires are doing their thing all over Arizona.

I don't want to make light of the problems in other areas, but feel free to send some rain our way.
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Old 07-07-2019, 10:13 AM
Nomad, 2nd Nomad, 2nd is offline
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Nomad, 2nd,

why would the HVAC not be covered again under another flood event. it is considered part of the building. Is there some exclusion in the national flood policy pertaining to HVAC. If a home is flooded a second time with coverage the claim is paid.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad, 2nd View Post

Note: it may work if it drys out, but you can't get paid for it 2x. Dried my mothers out after Katrina (I was raised, but not as high as the floor) and it worked for years. But I had her bank the money vs spend it because if it flooded again she would get $0.
:
for the same reason they make you get a salvage title when you total your car.

They won't pay you full retail for a damaged vehicle.

If they give you the money to replace it, and you don't.... You cannot get paid 2x.

Had that happen once, they moved upstairs and left the downstairs wrecked and waited for it to flood again.

I got there and was thinking "sweet, nice payday" (independent adjusters get paid more the more the claim is.... Because it's more work)

But you get copies of past claims for the property for just that reason.
I noticed they had the exact same cabnets, exact same flooring. (Possible, but unlikely) then I noticed the EXACT same dammage.

Then I Checked the SN of the furnace in the basement. (Matched the earlier claim)

Everything the same, insurance fraud, $220 is all I made for quite a bit of work.

In case this is unclear:
If you replace the HVAC (or aren't paid for replacement, but rather repair or cleaning) you CAN file a second claim if its damaged again.
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Old 07-10-2019, 07:55 PM
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Snapped this lightning-aided photo a couple months ago when we got ~10" overnight. This is the normally dry retention pond next to my house. Haven't seen it get any higher than this, not even during Harvey, but I'm not looking forward to the day it does.

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Old 07-12-2019, 09:02 PM
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I lived in Senath, Missouri from 1967 until 1985. Senath was built on one of the high dobs in the swamps between the Mississippi and St. Francis Rivers until the Little River Drainage District project was finished early in the 20th Century. (It was the biggest earth moving project in the world until the Panama Canal was built.)

The Little River Drainage District drained a huge area, creating some of the best cropland in the US. However, when the rivers get high, those Floodway ditches cannot carry it away fast enough so huge areas flood. It does drain away again, but the flood waters can be there for a while.

Since the levees all up and down the Mississippi have been raised, and new ones built closer to the river much higher than the old ones, to gain more 'usable' land, the same amount of rain we used to get periodically is not channeled into less space. And with the huge amounts of concrete that have been added to the area, part of the rain that soaked in is now dumped right into the river.

So, now when a levee breaks (or is blown), the floods can be even worse than they used to be since there is more water trapped, and it is deeper, so when it lets go, it moves fast and far.

Now I live in Reno, NV, two blocks from the Truckee River. But I am up a rise, and live on the third floor of a building that is on concrete piers for the garage, and then the first floor and up is stick built with stucco. For the water to even get in the first floor the River would have to be close to thirty feet deep at the street level at the river. The other side is lower, so the chances of it even getting into the first floor of this building is slim and none. Much less to the third floor.

That does not matter much to me, however. I still keep a PFD where I can get it. And the last time the Truckee flooded I took it with me whenever I was out and about the rest of the city. The only flooding was right along the river and very minor. I still took it, though.

When I lived in Senath, it was the same. Always had a PFD handy, and was prepared to leave before it was necessary. And if we did get caught unawares (not likely but nothing is impossible) my father kept a boat both anchored and tied up at the back door of the house. Literally.

And his radio shack was built on a foam floating dock platform so he could continue to provide communications for the area through the Amateur Radio net he was part of that the local government depended on for a big part of their comms during an emergency.

Additional items for flood situations was plenty of extra water, as it was farming land with all kinds of farm chemicals in the ground, as well has thousands of old as well as working private septic systems. The town sewer treatment lagoon was about three-eights of a mile from the house. It flooded out more than once in the years I lived there.

As a note on how fast it can flood, even without the river overflowing, my father and I were installing some black iron hydraulic lines under the equipment floor in a cotton gin one day. The floor was raised, but the area below was almost five feet tall altogether, about two feet of it below ground level. It was solid concrete all the way around however.

So, we were nice and dry until we finished and took our tools and the rest of what was left of the pipe and fittings out to the truck, through the access hatch. There was over eight inches of water standing in the parking lot. And everywhere we looked.

It had been sunny when we went under the building. We had not heard a thing when the storm blew in. The rain was coming down in sheets, with lightning and thunder all over the place.

We loaded up as quickly as we could and headed home. There were lots of places that did not have water covering them more than an inch or so, but the were the high spots. And even there the water still accumulated faster than it could run off to the lower spots.

Eight inches of water does not sound like much, and fortunately that water was not really flowing anywhere at any speed. It was hard to walk through though, and easy to stumble even when it was static. A kid falling down in it and not able to get up could drown in that much water.

Other places, that were lower and accumulated some of the run off from right around them had as much as two feet of accumulation during that four hour gully washer slash frog strangler.

Of course, that storm was what convinced me that when I saw a tortoise on the move when it had not rained for a while that we were in for a really heavy rain within three days of seeing it. I had seen one exactly three days before and did not really believe the saying at the time. I do now. Especially after I researched it.

Tortoises cannot swim like turtles and terrapins. They leave their cool, damp, low lying homes when they feel a storm coming.

Anyway, Keep extra water, have PFDs for everyone, have a long pole to feel the way in water you cannot see through, plenty of rope to tie off together so no one can be swept away.

It was critical back there to have protection from snakes as cottonmouths were common and would seek out anything to get out of the water to rest. And they were just as upset about being run out of their homes as everything else, and they are cranky to start with. I kept a short handled fish gig for that. Other animals, even in town, would climb up and out of the water into boats and anything else floating. Especially raccoons and opossums. And opossums have teeth like needles and are not afraid to use them.

Feral dogs and cats were a problem, too. Protection from the animals can be critical. Children often do not recognize the dangers they pose.

You will want a way to dry off and dry clothes to change into once you get out and away from the water and into a dry shelter area. If at all possible wearing waders, not just tall rubber boots, to keep the water away from the skin will help avoid the chemical burns from fuels in the water.

If necessary, and the risk of heat illness is not a big risk, wrap up everyone's legs with Saran Wrap and slip on tights or panty hose to keep it sealed. Then put on stout pants to protect against debris in the water if you have to get in it and walk. Try to have something that will float for the kids to ride, as well as most pets.

Someone should lead the way, with the pole probing the way. I have seen people step into holes under the water that were not there before the water came. A half dozen cars hitting a forming pot hole as things start can be enough to pound out a pretty deep hole. And if not expecting, a person can twist an ankle at the least, and go down in that mess at the worst. Get an extendable painting pole and tie a tether to it and the lead person so it is not lost.

If you do have a boat, whether or not it has a motor, do not count on the motor being usable. The water could be too shallow for it to run. You could shear a pin on the prop, bang it up bad enough it will not run, or the engine itself has problems. Some push poles as well as a pair of oars (put oar locks on the boat if it did not come with them, and a couple of paddles and a couple of spare paddles. Tether everything. You do not want to lose your paddles or push poles and not be able to navigate against any current. Even a one mile an hour current is difficult to go against with only ones hands.

Depending on the boat and a person's skills, consider adding a scull to the boat and learn how to use it.

I am running out of steam. And hurting.

That is it for now.

Just my opinion.
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Old 07-12-2019, 09:43 PM
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there are at least 2 houses on flood plains that are on 8ft high cast walls and surrounded by 4-5 ft high berms in my area.
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