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Old 10-02-2019, 05:16 PM
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Yes you need to pay attention as the weather changes due to the Grand Solar Minimum , the growing seasons are smaller , cooler longer in spring and sooner falls . The sharp contrasts between cool areas and hot areas are causing more hail and rain that is causing short falls in crops here in the USA and over the world . As shortages get worse food will get more expensive and maybe harder to find . Europe has already had problems and as countries have a harder time importing food ( from where ) people with empty plates get mean . Prepare yourselves .
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Old 10-03-2019, 05:41 PM
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Farmers here in mid Missouri are already harvesting their corn. Should be a good year as we have had plenty of rain. Soybeans also look good.
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Old 10-03-2019, 05:48 PM
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Farmers aren't stupid.... They pay closer attention than you do.

That said: food security is cheap and valuable.
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Old 10-03-2019, 05:53 PM
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Irregardless with global population going up food prices will continue to rise, and food quality is going down due to overproduction and loss of natural soil fertility and soil contamination.

Loss of ground water is effecting the amount of area that is farmable around the world. While farm land goes down, yeilds go up resulting in bad crop nutritional values and overproduction that creates reliance on chemically treating the land to make it producable.

Fish for instance are disappearing, if you want fish 20 years from now stock it now cause it will be mad expensive in a few years, and all sea fish will be factory farmed. Even river fish are bieng factory farmed these days in increasing amounts.

In the last 100 years we have gone from 1.7 billion people to over 7.7 billion people... that is like a 6x increase in global population over that time farmland use has gone down by over 50%.

We are looking at 10 billion people on this planet in the next 30 years with even less farmland.. so there is an agricultural revolution coming as we start factory farming in elevated buildings building in 3D with super efficient system with controlled microclimates... the move from using the planet to recreating it before we get flung to totally inhabitable spaces to live inside bottles. Not even to mention the devestating effects of climate change in the decades to come on planet pandaemonium.

As all natural life except for humans dies off, we are more and more moving to food production instead of harvesting food from the earth.

And with control of food access comes the ability to create markets that prices are based on supply and demand rather than people having a choice to grow their food or gain access from the market... and that is until your right to access the market is controlled by the powers and unless you have auhtorization to buy and sell through electronic commerce systems and the overlord be it goverment or some corporate power or both, you will be totally dependant on the permission to live.

More a reason to buy your food today than wait until you have no right to buy it and it cannot be grown.
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Old 10-04-2019, 01:20 PM
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Right now food commodity prices are so low that record numbers of farmers are going bankrupt or even commiting suicide.
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Old 10-21-2019, 01:07 PM
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All food crops tested, save a French bean grown in England, produce higher yields under higher levels of CO2. See the site: www.co2science.com

They have a lot of very good information debunking human caused climate change, all of it coming from peer reviewed scientific journals.
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Old 10-21-2019, 02:55 PM
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I have been talking on-line to other gardeners that have been affected by the Grand Solar Minimum. For anybody who does not know, the entire Midwest was hit hard by constant rainfall, frequent flooding, and very cold spring temperatures. The summer was warm enough to make the plants grow, though it was cooler than usual


My usual green bean did poorly under the new weather conditions, but I took another gardener's advice and grew Rattlesnake Pole beans. They produced as early as bush green beans and they tolerated the temperature swings fairly well. I got enough to freeze some. I am delighted and I will grow it again next year.

When the proper time to plant potatos arrived it was cold and wet and the potatos would have rotted if I had planted them at that time. Planting late would have made problems because the potatos need to set potatos in the cool of the spring: potatos do not set tubers when the soil is too warm. So, I potted up my potatos n yogurt pots, and when it was reliably warm out I planted the small potato plants. I got perhaps 50 pounds of potatos from a 30 foot by 4 foot bed. That is a reasonably good yeild for my area.

And, next year I will be trying Speckled Butter Peas, which are a kind of short season lima with small speckled seeds.

The Farmers all planted late, because it was too cold and too wet (the seed would have rotted), and nobody in my area has harvested yet. I suspect their yield will have been hurt due to the shorter season but I will not know until somebody harvests their crop and the results are posted where I can find it. I do know that we had a pretty sharp frost when most of the soybeans were just starting to turn yellow, though the corn looks properly ripe and dry. Still, traditionally the later the corn is planted the smaller the harvest, and the corn was planted VERY late due to the cold and wet. Again, until the corn and beans are harvested I do not really know how the area farmers have done
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Old 10-21-2019, 06:21 PM
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There's enough BS in some of these posts to fertilize much of the world.
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Old 10-21-2019, 06:53 PM
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Those who have ears, let them hear. And those who do not hear are on their own
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Old 12-11-2019, 01:56 PM
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I think there's two separate questions here but they're related to each other. You could expand this to ask "between solar changes, climate change, etc, what will be the impact?"

1. What will be the impact on the farmer? Depends. Growing seasons, depending on the area, may get longer or shorter. Some marginal land might become better, however some marginal land will likely become non-viable. But then, some previously non-viable land will become marginally profitable as well. So it's a mixed bag. Farmers in industrialized nations will be able to roll with the punches, either alone or with some as yet unannounced federal farm aid package, by updating equipment, seed varieties, and methodology. There will be winners and losers. Farmers in poorer parts of the world will struggle most, because they will be least able to adapt due to financial constraints.

2. How will it impact the consumer? Well that has a few answers. The most obvious one is that it will make most types of food and food-derived products more expensive. How much? Probably not much, at least here in the US. Keep in mind, agricultural tech continues to improve every year. We weren't starving to death in 1940, but food cost a lot more of your income back then. Now, the yields per acre are 7 times what they were in 1940. And the trend is likely to continue. The losses from these mild climate shifts are likely to push back against that trend, but even if our food production efficiency went back to say, 1980's levels, we would not be starving to death. We would just need to not go out to eat quite as often. Pizza might become a treat instead of something you do every friday night. Inconvenient but not the end of the world.

Now, this has a second part. Like I said, that's the American consumer, and consumers in food-exporting countries. In countries that import food, or poor countries that won't be able to keep up production after the change, things may get very hairy. People get upset when they find they can't afford to feed their children. It's viewed as a failure of government, which leads to revolt, or perhaps leads to one nation coveting another nation's arable land, which leads to war. China is a net food importer, today, during good times. So keep an eye on that.
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Old 12-16-2019, 08:05 AM
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Crops here in Mid- Missouri have all been harvested and most were quite good. My garden was one of the best ever. I had/have so many sweet potatoes, butternut squash and tomatoes that we were giving them to the neighbors. We ate ears from the first planting of sweet corn for 29 days before it became too hard. Then I was able to save enough corn seed to replant for the next two years. Yes, it was open pollinated.
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Old 12-16-2019, 10:39 AM
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Ag report Sat - Commodity crops in the Midwest (corn and soybeans), in total, can in at very good yield and total crop. Still most of the corn in ND in the fields as too wet to pick (until hard freeze allows equipment into fields).
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Old 12-16-2019, 10:51 AM
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We had a drought here in summer and fall, very unusual for this area. Almost nobody got a second cutting of hay and farmers were selling cattle in record numbers because the pastures were dried up.
You would think if the earth atmosphere was warmer like they are trying to tell us, you would get more evaporation and more rain. Instead we get record rain fall last year and spring, no rain in summer and fall. Makes me think something other than solar related OR "climate change" is messing with the weather. It almost appears like the earth is rotating off it's axis, maybe the poles have moved so much that it affects the weather in weird ways. Places that are usually wet are dry, seasons happen later in the year, or earlier, dry places get snow and so on. A bunch of weird crap happening and there is no way you can explain it way by saying there is too much CO2 in the atmosphere, or we are having a solar minimum.
Just my opinion, I can't prove that
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Old 12-16-2019, 11:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by airdrop View Post
Yes you need to pay attention as the weather changes due to the Grand Solar Minimum , the growing seasons are smaller , cooler longer in spring and sooner falls . The sharp contrasts between cool areas and hot areas are causing more hail and rain that is causing short falls in crops here in the USA and over the world . As shortages get worse food will get more expensive and maybe harder to find . Europe has already had problems and as countries have a harder time importing food ( from where ) people with empty plates get mean . Prepare yourselves .
With respect, you need to pay attention to a wider variety of changes than that.

I always point to four actual climate events that great affected North America.
The destruction of the Mississippian Culture (1350 AD), and the Anazazi cliff dwelers (1299 AD) due to drought.
The destruction of the Mayan Culture due to drought. (850 AD).
The Little Ice Age, including the year without a summer 1816, and the blizzard of 1888,
The Great Plains dust bowl drough of the 1930s, including the black blizzards, and the record high temps of 1934.

In comparison, recent climate is stable and fair.
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Old 12-16-2019, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Hick Industries View Post
With respect, you need to pay attention to a wider variety of changes than that.

I always point to four actual climate events that great affected North America.
The destruction of the Mississippian Culture (1350 AD), and the Anazazi cliff dwelers (1299 AD) due to drought.
The destruction of the Mayan Culture due to drought. (850 AD).
The Little Ice Age, including the year without a summer 1816, and the blizzard of 1888,
The Great Plains dust bowl drough of the 1930s, including the black blizzards, and the record high temps of 1934.

In comparison, recent climate is stable and fair.
well, and you could argue that despite the often criticized global supply chain, the ability to relatively straightforwardly import/export food internationally would allow nations to weather a once-in-a-hundred-years drought fairly easily, as long as they had the money
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Old 12-17-2019, 03:20 AM
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well, and you could argue that despite the often criticized global supply chain, the ability to relatively straightforwardly import/export food internationally would allow nations to weather a once-in-a-hundred-years drought fairly easily, as long as they had the money

Charities/NGOs/faith-based assistance... oh, and governmental foreign aid...
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Old 12-17-2019, 09:28 AM
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Charities/NGOs/faith-based assistance... oh, and governmental foreign aid...
right

i think for this kind of slow, adaptational SHTF you're going to be best served to stick to conventional fiscal advice....pay down debts, keep significant reserves with a good chunk in investment vehicles, as the price of food rises, either cut consumption or start producing more of your own, or start producing/consuming food that can be grown in the climate you have now.
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Old 12-17-2019, 05:43 PM
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right

i think for this kind of slow, adaptational SHTF you're going to be best served to stick to conventional fiscal advice....pay down debts, keep significant reserves with a good chunk in investment vehicles, as the price of food rises, either cut consumption or start producing more of your own, or start producing/consuming food that can be grown in the climate you have now.

Guess I should've put an /S after the government aid that *everyone* *assumes* will come bail them out

At the beginning of any SHTF, in the absence of insurmountable political obstacles (Rwanda, Sub-Sahara, etc.), there is usually help from somewhere(s), but as it progresses, available resources can dry up (pun intended)

On an individual level, normal fiscal prepping is always important, as is growing food that can be grown in the local area... as far as I am concerned, that includes adjacent climate zone(s), as well, so if the year is extra hot or cold, the plants survive.

But how often does a government pay off its debt
And how many individuals/families are being fiscally responsible
And how many people even grow one tomoato plant
How many can't keep flowers alive through the summer?
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Old 12-17-2019, 09:06 PM
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If you are worried about food, buy it now....it's cheap and available.

One million calories per person per year is a good round number to shoot for.
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Old 12-18-2019, 09:07 AM
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We had a drought here in summer and fall, very unusual for this area. Almost nobody got a second cutting of hay and farmers were selling cattle in record numbers because the pastures were dried up.
You would think if the earth atmosphere was warmer like they are trying to tell us, you would get more evaporation and more rain. Instead we get record rain fall last year and spring, no rain in summer and fall. Makes me think something other than solar related OR "climate change" is messing with the weather. It almost appears like the earth is rotating off it's axis, maybe the poles have moved so much that it affects the weather in weird ways. Places that are usually wet are dry, seasons happen later in the year, or earlier, dry places get snow and so on. A bunch of weird crap happening and there is no way you can explain it way by saying there is too much CO2 in the atmosphere, or we are having a solar minimum.
Just my opinion, I can't prove that filezilla uc browser rufus
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