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Old 10-22-2019, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by BabyBlue View Post
Denpends entirely on where your forest is. What grows in the woods of Missouri does not grow in the woods of Colorado.
and the time of year.

if you look in a good mushrooms ID book for instance it'll break them up by time of year you can harvest, or at least tag them that way. a lot available in spring, some summer, and a lot fall. winter.....not so much.

in a lot of places in the country you can find edible food to pick as you walk by. berry bushes and such.

but there's problems here that might not be obvious right away.

the obvious first problem is identification, which everyone understands is critical, but let's say that you know what's safe to eat and what isn't, and you know what roots are good to eat, and what plants are a good coffee substitute, etc, etc.

well that's all fine. but can you gather enough in the growing seasons to not only feed you then, but also provide in the seasons where it doesn't grow, and have a method for adequately preserving it until then?

also, processing this food is going to be about more than just eating it and storing it. because most of these wild edibles are not particularly calorie dense, even if they are very nutrient-rich. in order to get the calories you need to remain at the high level of activity necessary, you would need to eat more than you can stomach of most of these things in their raw forms.

to really be successful, you're going to need to be able to cook some of these things down into a more compact and calorie-dense form.

the moral of the story here, in general, is the hunter-gatherer is probably going to have a hard time survival if he's only gathering. there's not enough calories there.

but i suspect in a SHTF situation, there will be wild edibles long after the game is hunted out. and besides, there's no closed season typically on wild edibles, so long as mother nature does her part
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Old 10-22-2019, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Eenea View Post
Please do not eat raw leaves in a survival situation. They'll end up finding you in the fetal position with explosive diarrhea.

Leaves cannot provide you with the necessary nutrition, raw or cooked. Even animals equipped to digest leaves need to consume massive amount of leaves to derive the necessary nutrition. What edible leaves are good for is providing you with vitamins and minerals but those are needed in small amount. They are also a good source of fibre as well.



Now what should you eat in an SHTF situation (which can apply to a survival situation)?



Assuming you have at least 1 month of food ration on you.



You must first scout for trees such as oak (which is everywhere from where I am and in many places around the world). These produce acorn. Untreated acorns by itself have tannin which will prevent you from absorbing nutrients and hence cause starvation. But if you process the acorn over a few days by putting it in cold water and discarding the brown water over and over, you should have an amazing source of carbohydrate that can be turned into bread, powder, porridge etc. Even better acorns that have been dried can be stored for up to three years. A couple of trees alone can provide you enough acorn for a year! Untreated acorn can be turned into acorn oil through distillation. The oil can be used as cooking oil and a food source and fire starter among others. It can be used as a skin care product.



Now, while acorn is a good source of carb, it is not a good source of complete protein. You can start a cricket farm for example and baked the cricket and turn them into a powder that could be mixed with the acorn powder. You should only need around 10 kg of cricket powder a year, added to the acorn powder to complete the protein profile.



You can hunt for small animals, fish, and birds as a source of meat that can be turned into jerky and store for a long time. You can even have a mouse farm using a few breeding pairs mice that can be transported. Mice consume very little food and acorn will be a good feed.



Cattail stems can be sauteed with the meat to provide a morale boosting meal reminiscent of noodle or pasta. Note cat tail by itself is not a proper source of carbohydrate and protein. You can't survive on cattail alone



Edible leaves while not a good source of carb (in fact you take energy to digest these) and protein, are a good source of minerals, vitamins and fibres. Think of them as supplements rather than food in a survival term. NEVER consider them as food.



Pine pollen is a good source of protein and carb in spring.



You should be constantly harvesting berries, fruits, mushrooms etc to supplement your diet. By the sea, you can find all manners seafood and edible algae.
Great info here, thanks for sharing.

Sent from my Note 8 using Tapatalk
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Old 10-22-2019, 04:53 PM
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Excellent post, and a big welcome to here Eenea!

However, this bolded part is not true:

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Originally Posted by Eenea View Post
Now, while acorn is a good source of carb, it is not a good source of complete protein.
Acorns supply all eight essential amino acids, meaning they are a complete protein (and don’t need to be combined with other foods to make it complete, as you would beans and rice, for example).
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Old 10-22-2019, 05:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Nomad, 2nd View Post
You tried harvesting them?

I've done chestnuts and acorns this year.... Let's just say I'm going to increase my grain stocks!
Yes, sir! Cattails are one of my favorite wild edibles/utility plants because they are like a self-contained supermarket. (Google it and be amazed.)

Acorns are also near the top of my favorites list. There's a good thread here about that: https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...d.php?t=899692
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Old 10-23-2019, 04:37 AM
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Old 10-23-2019, 04:38 AM
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Originally Posted by GrizzlyetteAdams View Post
Excellent post, and a big welcome to here Eenea!

However, this bolded part is not true:



Acorns supply all eight essential amino acids, meaning they are a complete protein (and don’t need to be combined with other foods to make it complete, as you would beans and rice, for example).
Wow. You are right. I'm pleasantly surprise that acorn has a complete protein profile. This puts acorn at a level of superfood when it comes to survival. It beggars belief that acorn flour is not more popular.
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Old 10-23-2019, 06:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Eenea View Post
Wow. You are right. I'm pleasantly surprise that acorn has a complete protein profile. This puts acorn at a level of superfood when it comes to survival. It beggars belief that acorn flour is not more popular.

Acorns are much more labor-intensive to process and not quite as delicious as most nuts are. But they're still popular with deer, squirrels and a few oddball folks like me and you!
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Old 10-23-2019, 09:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrizzlyetteAdams View Post
Acorns are much more labor-intensive to process and not quite as delicious as most nuts are. But they're still popular with deer, squirrels and a few oddball folks like me and you!
Hogs just love acorns and pork is tasty.
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Old 10-24-2019, 07:38 PM
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Depends on the forest/wilderness you’re in

If you look at the Indigenous Australians, they were great survivors, they’re cal experts at living off the land - but they were pretty much hand to mouth. The majority of their day was spent searching for enough food to eat for just that day and travelling, that’s why they largely remained the most primitive group on Earth
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Old 10-25-2019, 12:07 AM
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Our local park in the hills had a class on wild edibles. about 30 people spent 2 hours following the leader around and picking wild goodies. We then returned to the picnic table area and cooked lunch.

Even though I am a country girl who grew up snacking while I hiked, I learned a lot. I even discovered a few more weeds in my own yard that I did not know were edible.

Now I do not remove the wild radish, but keep in in control by eating it while I do yard work!.
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