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Old 01-14-2019, 08:34 PM
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Been fortunate to not have issues with SVB out here in Oregon (yet). Back in NC, we found the squash that had the longest vines worked best. We buried the vines every 4-6 ft in soil or mulch to help them root along the length. Seemed to limit damage from borers. The trombocino squash worked great as a zucchini substitute, and resisted borers, but it takes up a LOT of room!

In our case here in OR, at least, there is such a thing as planting winter squash too early. We had pumpkins and butter nuts in July last year after planting in May Great for the summer squash, but we'll be planting the main winter squash crop in June/July this year, I think.
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Old 01-14-2019, 10:53 PM
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Great for the summer squash, but we'll be planting the main winter squash crop in June/July this year, I think.
That is sort of what I had in mind... plant the winter squash late enough in the season to hopefully avoid the worst of the SVB infestations. About the same timeframe as you.

We are far enough south that September is still much like summer, as far as temp and sunlight is concerned. October is a little more dicey, but the weather is usually pretty mild, if not still very warm.

According to the USDA, our average first frost date around here is Nov. 1st. But it's usually a week or 2 later than that, from my experience.
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Old 01-18-2019, 07:36 PM
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No gardening activity outdoors yet, but one of the hibiscus plants I am over-wintering indoors bloomed today.

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Old 01-19-2019, 09:41 AM
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Heard a commotion coming from the garden area earlier this morning. I looked outside, it was the local crows and squirrels quarreling over the feed I put out for them each winter. There were actually two more squirrels besides this one, but I couldn't get everyone in the same shot.



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Old 01-19-2019, 10:18 AM
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The hibiscus blooms just keep coming. Yesterday was the smaller one with pink-ish flowers. This morning the larger plant with red flowers has put out a bloom.

As an added bonus, one of the cats photobombed my pic.

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Old 01-19-2019, 01:56 PM
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Squash borers: I had SOME luck with mounding fresh cedar shavings at the base of the plant.... I found "Tennessee vine'ing pumpkin" and NO PROBLEM AT ALL, in the same year total loss zucchini etc.... grew second year and great again, but have never been able to find seed again. This year I built a small "screen room" and planted parthonegenic zucchini (does not need pollinating), and cedar shaving for mulch in the whole 'room' (6-sided, sides about 30", 4' tall) screen room, LOTS of squash for about 6 weeks then sudden death (I think from wilt).
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Old 01-19-2019, 02:10 PM
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No gardening activity outdoors yet, but one of the hibiscus plants I am over-wintering indoors bloomed today.

Gorgeous
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Old 01-19-2019, 03:19 PM
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I took this one a little while ago. It's strange how they keep showing up at the same time.

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Old 01-19-2019, 03:39 PM
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Maybe one comes for a snack and the other thinks, "Uh oh, something's there and I'm missing out. Gotta go check". :D
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Old 01-19-2019, 07:41 PM
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The wind gusts were so strong today that it snapped the wind speed indicator off my little plastic weather station. Of course, the cold no doubt made the plastic more brittle than usual, but still...

I figure if I can find the piece that broke off then I could probably repair it with modeling cement or something similar. But no luck so far. I didn't spend a lot of time looking though, it was just too cold and windy today. I'll try again after it warms up a little.

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Old 01-19-2019, 09:47 PM
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Originally Posted by RobertSWMissouri View Post
Squash borers: I had SOME luck with mounding fresh cedar shavings at the base of the plant.... I found "Tennessee vine'ing pumpkin" and NO PROBLEM AT ALL, in the same year total loss zucchini etc.... grew second year and great again, but have never been able to find seed again. This year I built a small "screen room" and planted parthonegenic zucchini (does not need pollinating), and cedar shaving for mulch in the whole 'room' (6-sided, sides about 30", 4' tall) screen room, LOTS of squash for about 6 weeks then sudden death (I think from wilt).
In another active thread, someone posted a link to this document:

http://permaculturenews.org/resource..._Com_Plant.pdf

In addition to companion planting, it also lists plants which supposedly repel certain garden pests. One of the listed pests is "Moths". Since the Squash Vine Borer is the larva of a moth, I'm wondering if this might be worth looking into as a means of controlling them.

I've read that dill will repel spider mites, so I plan on trying that this coming year by planting it among my marigolds. I get spider mites every summer, last year was particularly bad. And once they get established, they are very hard to control. They attack not only my marigolds but also my morning glories and moonflowers.
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Old 01-26-2019, 08:57 PM
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Today was a sunny, mild day and I finally got out and did some work in the garden.

We were just talking about Bermuda grass over in Farmer Chad's thread. This pic shows a section of my garden that got overrun with Bermuda grass last Fall. Unfortunately, I had a lot of drama suddenly turn up in my life at that time, and my gardening activity immediately dropped to zero. The Bermuda grass took advantage of my absence and went wild before first frost finally shut it down for the year.




I knew that digging out all that grass would be some work, but it ended up not taking as long as I expected. I was only at it for a little over an hour.




Once the digging was finished, I ran over the bed with my garden cultivator, to break up the clods and smooth out the surface.




I have no doubt that there are still many Bermuda grass roots that I did not get out of the ground. I will have to watch this bed closely when things start to warm up, and be ready to grub out any new Bermuda grass shoots I see.
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Old 01-26-2019, 09:51 PM
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Have you considered mulching your beds?

After my sudden realizing a couple years ago, I really feel its the way to go.
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Old 01-26-2019, 11:24 PM
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Have you considered mulching your beds?
I don't know, given enough time Bermuda grass seems capable of punching through just about anything short of solid steel... and it just goes around that.

What do you use?
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Old 01-26-2019, 11:38 PM
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No gardening activity outdoors yet, but one of the hibiscus plants I am over-wintering indoors bloomed today.

I have a few hibiscus plants. Couple white that migrated from Georgia, couple red and some pink I purchased last year. It looks like yours are the tropical. (shiny leaves) Blooms look like the Rose of Sharon
Mine are a hardy landscape type, guess you could say.
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Old 01-27-2019, 07:21 AM
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I don't know, given enough time Bermuda grass seems capable of punching through just about anything short of solid steel... and it just goes around that.

What do you use?
Well thats true. It is mighty darn aggressive.

Im really enjoying the benefits of wood mulch. I have a local supplier. They fill up the bed of my truck for $20. Its a hell of a good deal. I have tried grass clippings but for me it does jack squat. I can also get leaf mulch from the same supplier as the wood, for free.

I think with the bermuda you just have to stay on it, until its under control.
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Old 01-27-2019, 07:59 AM
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Quote:
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I don't know, given enough time Bermuda grass seems capable of punching through just about anything short of solid steel... and it just goes around that.

What do you use?
I use leaves. Mulch keeps the soil soft, making pulling out any regenerating renegades easier to pull out. It also helps to prevent any bermuda you miss from rooting down along its length... at least for a while.
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Old 01-27-2019, 01:35 PM
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I use leaves. Mulch keeps the soil soft, making pulling out any regenerating renegades easier to pull out. It also helps to prevent any bermuda you miss from rooting down along its length... at least for a while.
Agreed. Bermuda loves to root into our clay soil like its nothing. Pulling it just creates a mess. Softer soil though, you can often get large pieces out of.
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Old 01-27-2019, 02:34 PM
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Bermuda grass is the bane of my existence. I am very slowly trying to kill off the backyard. Hopefully by the end of this summer I will have nothing in my backyard but raised beds and mulched walkways. I'm seriously considering turning the ducks and chickens out into the yard and see if they can kill off the vegetation in the yard like they have the vegetation that was in their pens.

I don't think it would be much trouble to build little covers for the raised beds to keep them out -- I have been contemplating building covers for the ones that are resting and putting a covey of quail in them to let the little buggers scratch the cover crop under and fertilize ... kill 2 birds with one stone.
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Old 01-27-2019, 06:38 PM
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I'm going to try walking onions this year and see how I like them.
If it's a total failure, oh well, 50 lb bags are cheap.
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