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Old 01-08-2019, 08:42 PM
purplehullpeas purplehullpeas is offline
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Been a lot of great info already. Don't be discouraged by the warnings people are giving. The task you're taking on are rough, to say the least. But I believe you'll be stronger for it the longer you last. Look at every day you stay there as an accomplishment...don't keep looking at how much longer you have.
The propane stove is a great ideal for rainy days. Cooking over a fire will be difficult until you get the hang of it, then it will become second nature.
Your dogs should help keep the hogs away, growling or barking. They should know the hogs are close before you do.
I'd keep something like a 38 pistol on hand with rat shot for snakes and rats.
I agree whole heartedly with a stronger shelter than a tent if possible. God forbid you get stuck out there during a hurricane, tornado or hail storm.
If you're starting in the fall, you might try planting "cold weather plants", including lettuce, kale, onions, carrots, even potatoes if you can early enough. Gives you a since of accomplishment if it grows to harvest successfully. Basically, the vegetables you would put into a stew..plus they store for a while with little effort.
All I can think of for now, plus Trump's fixing to speak, so I'll check back later.
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Old 01-08-2019, 09:31 PM
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I’m sure you’ve already got this down but a well stocked first aid kit. Should include blood clotting powder and stuff for a tourniquet for a bad slip of a knife or errant swing of an axe. You can suffer thru some bad sprains and even a broken bone getting to the doctor but when your bleeding bad in addition to being life threatening the panic can take over. Out in the backwoods I think you need to slow down and think out the risks when your working. I have a hunting cabin in the Ozarks that’s very remote with no close neighbors and after a few mishaps I’ve learned a little pre-thought before doing a task can keep some bad accidents from happening when working. You need a good satellite image of the property to pick out the best possible sites before an on-site advance scouting trip. I would try for the best site that is some distance from any obvious old road or trail to minimize contact with unauthorized trespassers. They will show up probably on ATVs especially for deer and turkey seasons. Ticks and chiggers are no fun. Treat the clothing and bring plenty of spray. Don’t know if you could treat the immediate camp area by spreading some type of granular pesticide. I know burning the grass/leaves in the late winter or early spring knocks them back for the following summer but I’m sure that’s not an option for you. I have had two close calls with wild dogs that required firearm response. In my opinion you will need a gun handy at all times. Just some random thoughts...sounds like it will be a great adventure and with the advance planning you are doing now will be successful.
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Old 01-08-2019, 09:34 PM
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Some of these “random” guys have some great advice, and much more importantly, real life experience. Wish you luck in this endeavor, and I’m sure you all will learn a great deal.
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Old 01-08-2019, 09:44 PM
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Originally Posted by purplehullpeas View Post
Been a lot of great info already. Don't be discouraged by the warnings people are giving. The task you're taking on are rough, to say the least. But I believe you'll be stronger for it the longer you last. Look at every day you stay there as an accomplishment...don't keep looking at how much longer you have.
The propane stove is a great ideal for rainy days. Cooking over a fire will be difficult until you get the hang of it, then it will become second nature.
Your dogs should help keep the hogs away, growling or barking. They should know the hogs are close before you do.
I'd keep something like a 38 pistol on hand with rat shot for snakes and rats.
I agree whole heartedly with a stronger shelter than a tent if possible. God forbid you get stuck out there during a hurricane, tornado or hail storm.
If you're starting in the fall, you might try planting "cold weather plants", including lettuce, kale, onions, carrots, even potatoes if you can early enough. Gives you a since of accomplishment if it grows to harvest successfully. Basically, the vegetables you would put into a stew..plus they store for a while with little effort.
All I can think of for now, plus Trump's fixing to speak, so I'll check back later.
I appreciate your response. I believe that it's a challenge, but one worth pursuing. After all this advice, we will most likely try to build a shelter around our tent. I definitely plan on gardening, its already a hobby of mine. Thank you for your thoughts!
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Old 01-08-2019, 09:48 PM
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I don't think I've seen this mentioned yet, but practice EVERYTHING. Learn to change flashlight batteries in the dark, load guns in the dark, take a first aid course. Focus on heat and cold injuries, exposure, trench foot, etc.

Have tools and supplies to fix your stuff. Tent patches, tool sharpening, duck tape, basic mechanics tools, hammer and nails, and tons of cordage. A lot of 5 gallon buckets.
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Old 01-08-2019, 10:51 PM
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Our motivation for doing this.. Hm. Well, it's a long list of things. My husband and I aren't "preppers" yet, but we want to be prepared when/if something detrimental happens. I am interested in sustainability and it seems like there's no better way to become "one with nature" than living in it. My friend likes to call the idea "Jesus boot camp". This is one way of becoming closer to God and nature all at once. That's all I really care to share with everyone.

I know this is going to be hard, we are just starting the planning process. We have plenty of time to save money and prepare for it. We aren't planning on just up and leaving society for the wild life, this is a process. We don't expect this to be easy or fun, but I think knowing how to live off the grid- survival style- is very unique and useful knowledge.
I'm not a big fan of bugs, but that's just something I will have to get over. Like I said, we eventually want to live off of our own land one day as we build a house. I can deal with bugs and snakes and the such.

I'll add a gas stove to the list, it will be a wise investment.
I still need to look at our budget to decide what guns we will have, but I will look at shotguns, rifles, and handguns. I dont have much knowledge of firearms currently, but I plan on educating myself.
As for housing, there is a house on the land nearby but it's for other people. Maybe some sort of airbnb, I don't really know. That's where we would park our cars and hike from.
Our cars wouldn't make it all the way to the camp site, sadly. They'd probably be about an hour away.

I plan on buying a canvas tent- or something like it. Any suggestions on brands? I need to dog nail-proof the floor so we don't have to keep fixing holes in our floor, maybe I'll do wood. I don't think he'll allow us to build anything on the land other than maybe a small wood shed to keep our supplies in.

Thank you to everyone giving actual advice. You are much appreciated.
I have no problem answering questions about specifics, but if your whole response is about why I shouldn't do this- don't bother. Some random dude on the internet isn't going to dissuade me or anyone else.
Sounds good and you are not obligated to answer any questions I or others have but it is appreciated if you do.

I am wondering about when you will do this? You say you have plenty of time to save and prepare which is good but are you going to wait another year or more? Things can change even within a year but the better prepared you are with knowledge, gear etc. the better.
Myself I many times just do It. I many times also just learn as I go although I have a good book or two to help if needed but I have usually been able to figure things out by myself. Which is very satisfying when things do work out even if what I do or build is not society approved.

And is it possible to trade your vehicle or cars in for a pickup truck preferably 4x4?
It will save you a Lot of work carrying stuff if you must carry all your gear etc. an hour from where you must park. I guess that is an hour of walking?

Others can give probably good advice on weapons. And check out the firearms section for huge amounts of info. I always like to have a 12 gauge shotgun, have several and one or more handguns. A rifle also. 12 gauge is good and readily available ammo as well as other calibers for rifles, handguns and such.

And many likely won't like my suggestion of a handgun but if you cannot afford a $500 plus handgun then a HiPoint 9 mm or .45 might be ok. They are probably the least expensive handguns and always seem to work no matter what in my experience anyway. Although I have not shot mine too much it is ok and I plan to get a Glock etc. also soon.

Here is a link I found quickly about bug tents that is tents to keep out bugs. All kinds and likely there are others also. If you do get a canvas tent then make sure it is bug proof. But the link to choose from many kinds > http://www.bizrate.com/bug-screen-tent/

There is a screen to put over the entrance to a toy hauler if that might work for you.

I just remembered that there are a few ways to wash clothes. I did find a small plastic clothes washer with a handle that will wash one shirt etc. at a time. Google or search for it if you wish. They are about fifty dollars I think. Something that my grandparents did was use a laundry board and scrub.

I have used a toilet plunger in a large plastic tub also to wash clothes. Bought a New never used toilet plunger though. I have seen plungers for one dollar at the Dollar Tree store although large ones might be better. Works pretty well and more work but better than scrubbing in a stream etc.

And I have posted quite a few times before that I never work harder physically than I do on my BOL / remote mtn retreat / camp all summer for many summers since 1987. Especially carrying logs, firewood, supplies etc. up the mountain. And digging two 20 foot long by ten foot wide by about nine feet deep holes. The holes for the bunker and the latest one for a new cabin that will be in the side of the mountain.

But I do not regret any of the huge amounts of work and time that I have put in almost every summer since 1987 up there.
I plan to retire from society and this next summer begin my real life finally on my Rocky Mtn place.

I love nature, wild animals etc. etc. One big reason I will likely never have a dog up there since I see and experience all kinds of wildlife even up close if I am in a blind, a tent or other hidden shelter.

And Living like most cannot even dream of living somewhat similar to the way many lived more than a hundred years ago. Although I will and do have much more gear, supplies etc. than any of them did in the past.
I also am my own boss and if any mistakes are made then no one to blame except myself. AND I Never feel more FREE than being up in remote mountains far from cities and their suffocating ways of too many rules, regs, etc. etc. etc.

I hope to post more pics and maybe even a video or two as I progress more and more up there on the only place on this planet I feel the most comfortable and Living like I truly need and want to do!

Hope others can also and even post some pics if you are able or inclined to.
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Old 01-09-2019, 04:25 AM
randolphrowzeebragg randolphrowzeebragg is offline
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Most of the advice on this thread is coming from people who are trying to improve land they already own to make it more habitable. The OP is basically camping a mile from a rental property, not trying to survive a year in central Alaska. For transporting supplies, I'd suggest getting a used four wheeler ATV that can go about anywhere, although walking for an hour isn't extremely taxing if you are in good physical condition. In fact, the walk will force you to be more selective of what you want to bring into your camp.
When my family's hunting cabin burned down in a forest fire, I bought one of these and we are still using it. https://www.harborfreight.com/10-ft-...age-62860.html . I built a wood floor for it, and with some mosquito netting for screens, it's a very strong structure that is easy to assemble and very tough. It's completely waterproof, has lasted three years so far with no holes, and vermin aren't interested in chewing into it the way they would with cotton canvas.
You could build some simple beds that would be padded with air mattresses that could be folded up against the walls when not in use. It is easy to string fabric partitions for privacy or showers. We attached a large piece of nylon to the front roof that we use as a porch, where we do chores like cooking, washing etc.
It would seem kind of stupid to build a wood structure when you only plan on staying on the land for a year. And you should only be in the tent during wet weather anyway. You would spend the rest of your time getting a garden going and improving your camp in general.

When it comes time for you to leave, you'll have very little to pack out, and within a year the land should look the same as it did when you moved in.
There are a set of BBC documentaries called "The Farm Series" in which three historians spend a year living on a farm that is equipped as it would be in the Tutor, Victorian, Georgian, and WWII times.
The settings are very accurate and the historians involved know how farming was done in more primitive times. You can get lots of ideas about how to run your camp.
The first thing to remember is that it was extremely hard work, so be prepared. You might want to practice tasks like chopping wood with an axe instead of a chainsaw, and maybe carry a heavy pack to simulate carrying heavy loads.
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Old 01-09-2019, 06:12 AM
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I have been following this thread since you started it

I pride myself on my direct...honest approach to things. Other words....I donít sugarcoat
Your ideal is crazy.... even if you attempt it... you will fail miserably. From what I have read so far no one in your group has any outdoors experience. Self learning and reading books will only get you killed.

Every few months we get someone new here and they start a thread about how they are gonna go into the wilderness and live. A bunch of members will jump in and start offering tons of advice. Mainly because they live their fantasies through your fantasy

You made comment that you and your husband couldnít afford your own land. So why donít you and your husband spend a year working at a job to earn money and save to buy your own land instead of screwing up someone elseís property

If you even attempt this.... you will fail miserably
Just being honest.....
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Old 01-09-2019, 07:41 AM
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The first thing to remember is that it was extremely hard work, so be prepared. You might want to practice tasks like chopping wood with an axe instead of a chainsaw, and maybe carry a heavy pack to simulate carrying heavy loads.
Setting up a homestead even for just one year is hard work. But from all that I have experienced it can be as hard and as difficult as one wishes it to be. It depends on how fancy one wishes to live.

In my case, creating a wilderness-like retreat / BOL slowly but surely since 1987 some years were harder work than others. Such as the couple years I spent digging a 20x10x 9 foot deep hole for the bunker. Digging by hand with a pick, shovel, buckets, wheelbarrow, pry bars to pry out rocks etc.

Compared to digging the large hole in the rocky Rocky Mountains building and carrying supplies etc. up the mountain was easy.

If people think they need a large fancy cabin / house then it will be more difficult than parking an RV / camper trailer on some land. And there are easy and harder ways to do things but people probably have to figure out all of that as they go along.

Such as obtaining firewood, there are easy and hard ways to do it. Harder to stack huge piles of firewood nice and neatly than just throwing the firewood into a large pile.
And instead of splitting all or much of your firewood then gather smaller branches and cut them up small enough to fit a woodstove instead of splitting most of the wood.
I plan to do that at least at first instead of spending a lot of time cutting, splitting, stacking firewood.

I also save time and energy by not washing clothes more than twice a month. If I go into town I take large trash bags full of dirty clothes to the laundromat in town. My case the town with the stores, laundromat etc. is Saratoga, WY 30 miles away.

I am a believer in people just doing stuff and learning from others, even from some good books But learning the most by figuring stuff out as one goes along.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodwrench708 View Post
I have been following this thread since you started it

I pride myself on my direct...honest approach to things. Other words....I donít sugarcoat
Your ideal is crazy.... even if you attempt it... you will fail miserably. From what I have read so far no one in your group has any outdoors experience. Self learning and reading books will only get you killed.

Every few months we get someone new here and they start a thread about how they are gonna go into the wilderness and live. A bunch of members will jump in and start offering tons of advice. Mainly because they live their fantasies through your fantasy

You made comment that you and your husband couldnít afford your own land. So why donít you and your husband spend a year working at a job to earn money and save to buy your own land instead of screwing up someone elseís property

If you even attempt this.... you will fail miserably
Just being honest.....
I think it depends on how badly they wish to do this and how motivated and determined they are to carry it thru.

They are a family instead of a single male like almost all the ones who post and say they just want to go off and live in the woods for a year or for the rest of their lives.

Much easier when people have two or more people to help each other. As I have experienced over many years now. I usually have only myself to depend on, to carry stuff up the mountain. Usually carry stuff 200 or so feet from where I park on my 4x4 driveway to where my bunker and sheds are located.

Much slower and difficult doing everything by myself but just have to do what is needed with what one has, even if not much or Have to do it all by myself.

And regarding this quote: "A bunch of members will jump in and start offering tons of advice. Mainly because they live their fantasies through your fantasy" I am sure there is some or maybe even a lot of that. Not in my case however!
Just one more reason I have posted many pics, even a video or two showing and proving what I do and have done over the past 3 decades.

I truly hope that the OP / Jroos and her family etc. will do this for at least a year. If it gets too difficult they can stop and go back to society and live like most live / exist.

Hope they will also post some pics someday showing and proving what they are doing and prove the naysayers wrong.
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Old 01-09-2019, 08:00 AM
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I'm rooting for you OP. Its not like you can't quit, walk out and start over in the city.

Some years back there was a local couple with like 3 little kids that wintered two or maybe three times in a military tent GP Large with a liner I think. The local church had several fund raiser for them. We built them a nice 2 story cabin 20'x24' free and clear. Less than 5 years later the land and the cabin was sold at auction because the idiot borrowed money against the improvements - not a good plan when you don't have a job (back injuries and a felon to boot) and your welfare plus supplemental social security income barely covers the land payment.


I lived in my house for 7 years without grid power and running water. The first year I didn't even have a wood stove. Three weeks at -30 in the house was part of my first winter. One of my friends drove his crawler over to clear out the ice and snow in my 100 yard long driveway. His buddy came in the house for a while to wait - after about 1/2 he told me he was going to wait outside because it was warmer - which was true.
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Old 01-09-2019, 08:18 AM
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What general area of East Texas? if you can tell me the county I can maybe help you out with some more specific information.
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Old 01-09-2019, 08:48 AM
mtnairkin mtnairkin is offline
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I've read the thread from the beginning. From what I can gather, the Piney Woods are uninhabitable by real human beings. Some cretins and maybe cyborgs have only a slight chance.

This is a bit contrary to what I've experienced in the Piney Woods of Texas and several other places. As we all have seen, these 'fantasies' come up quite often. I would wager 99% of them never materialize beyond the talking about it. This one is a bit different because the woman is searching for information and apparently willing and beyond that a driving force in consummating the idea. Also different is she is listening to advice and considering it.

If this couple ever makes a start on this idea as always I'd like to see some follow up (there usually isn't any). Why no follow up I can only guess. Several things come to mind, 'never got it to the starting point', 'tried it for a few days and realized they were over their heads', 'did a McCandless and died in the swamps but didn't make the news (only a few suicidal ones actually die).

I've read through the posts several times (both thoroughly at first and then skimming later) and I'll pick a few pieces of advice at random that will help her/them make reasonable choices and stay within their given parameters.

Number one of course is re-evaluate the wisdom of going. If this is what and where you are wanting to do, do it. You probably won't die (but by being stupid you can). At best you will succeed and likely the worst is that you will spend enough time there to learn from your mistakes and just as important, your successes.

A waterproof tent (garage) as mentioned from harbor freight is useful for storage/cooking etc. Not so great for living because of condensation problems. You can put mosquito net on the end openings. Relatively cheap.

Select a screened tent as MMM put out an extensive list above. Cooking and/or lounging.

A tent, canvas is OK but it does have some shortcomings in damp areas. Big enough to stand up and walk around in. A fly over the top to shed rain (it allows the canvas to breathe and still keep you dry). Good for storage under the edges. A WOOD FLOOR. If you build nothing else, pack in enough lumber to build it. A shack is better than a tent but under your stated conditions not an option.

A Coleman stove, I think you'd be wiser to take one that burns unleaded gas rather than propane. Much easier to pack fuel and more efficient. If you are determined to use only wood, a rocket stove (or two) is a quantum leap above a campfire. Both have a learning curve, not rocket science despite the name.

As well as the usual utensils and tools, a lantern is a necessity (I don't remember it being mentioned). Batteries wear out, get one that burns kerosene or white gas. I've lived in areas with hordes of mosquitoes. I prefer netting over bug dope. I have used many kinds of insect repellent and find none of them very effective without continual application especially when working and sweating. Also I've never been comfortable putting something on my skin that melts the plastic on my fishing reels.

Firearms for hunting and protection.

If you do it or not let us know.

For the beginning don't plan on living off the land, carry food in and keep it protected.

Oh, I doubt if the property is thousands of acres (I'll have to go back and look) and even alone I could carry all the supplies listed in in a day or two.
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Old 01-09-2019, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by charliemeyer007 View Post
I'm rooting for you OP. Its not like you can't quit, walk out and start over in the city.




I lived in my house for 7 years without grid power and running water. The first year I didn't even have a wood stove.




This......
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:03 AM
mtnairkin mtnairkin is offline
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I went back and looked. It is 250 acres. I live on a little more than 250 acres and there isn't a place on it that I couldn't carry all the listed gear in, in a day, or two if I'm lazy.

I do have reasonably good dry walking, so if you have swamp or heavy brush/briers it will be different.
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Chew View Post
What general area of East Texas? if you can tell me the county I can maybe help you out with some more specific information.
We're going to be in Harrison County
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:30 AM
Jroos Jroos is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtnairkin View Post
I've read the thread from the beginning. From what I can gather, the Piney Woods are uninhabitable by real human beings. Some cretins and maybe cyborgs have only a slight chance.

This is a bit contrary to what I've experienced in the Piney Woods of Texas and several other places. As we all have seen, these 'fantasies' come up quite often. I would wager 99% of them never materialize beyond the talking about it. This one is a bit different because the woman is searching for information and apparently willing and beyond that a driving force in consummating the idea. Also different is she is listening to advice and considering it.

If this couple ever makes a start on this idea as always I'd like to see some follow up (there usually isn't any). Why no follow up I can only guess. Several things come to mind, 'never got it to the starting point', 'tried it for a few days and realized they were over their heads', 'did a McCandless and died in the swamps but didn't make the news (only a few suicidal ones actually die).

I've read through the posts several times (both thoroughly at first and then skimming later) and I'll pick a few pieces of advice at random that will help her/them make reasonable choices and stay within their given parameters.

Number one of course is re-evaluate the wisdom of going. If this is what and where you are wanting to do, do it. You probably won't die (but by being stupid you can). At best you will succeed and likely the worst is that you will spend enough time there to learn from your mistakes and just as important, your successes.

A waterproof tent (garage) as mentioned from harbor freight is useful for storage/cooking etc. Not so great for living because of condensation problems. You can put mosquito net on the end openings. Relatively cheap.

Select a screened tent as MMM put out an extensive list above. Cooking and/or lounging.

A tent, canvas is OK but it does have some shortcomings in damp areas. Big enough to stand up and walk around in. A fly over the top to shed rain (it allows the canvas to breathe and still keep you dry). Good for storage under the edges. A WOOD FLOOR. If you build nothing else, pack in enough lumber to build it. A shack is better than a tent but under your stated conditions not an option.

A Coleman stove, I think you'd be wiser to take one that burns unleaded gas rather than propane. Much easier to pack fuel and more efficient. If you are determined to use only wood, a rocket stove (or two) is a quantum leap above a campfire. Both have a learning curve, not rocket science despite the name. [IMG class=inlineimg]https://www.survivalistboards.com/images/smilies/smile.gif[/IMG]

As well as the usual utensils and tools, a lantern is a necessity (I don't remember it being mentioned). Batteries wear out, get one that burns kerosene or white gas. I've lived in areas with hordes of mosquitoes. I prefer netting over bug dope. I have used many kinds of insect repellent and find none of them very effective without continual application especially when working and sweating. Also I've never been comfortable putting something on my skin that melts the plastic on my fishing reels.

Firearms for hunting and protection.

If you do it or not let us know.

For the beginning don't plan on living off the land, carry food in and keep it protected.

Oh, I doubt if the property is thousands of acres (I'll have to go back and look) and even alone I could carry all the supplies listed in in a day or two.
Lots of great advice here. Thank you!
No matter what the negative Nancy's on this forum say, we are going to go through with this. Having four people is definitely going to help us, and we are also going to go out there for a bit first.
I will do my best to follow through with pictures and everything, if only to prove the nay-sayers wrong.
We're trying to pack kind of light, but luxurious- if that's even possible. It'll probably take us a couple days of trips to get all of our stuff out there, but I know it will be worth it to have some conveniences.
What kind of housing/tent would you recommend for damp areas?
If we do a canvas tent with a wood floor, would we have the tent on a tarp, and then put the wood flooring on the very inside? Do you think we would have a problem with the wood tearing/scratching at the tent? We'll have patches and things, but I want to save those for mishaps rather than for something we could have prepared for.
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:42 AM
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Sky1950 Sky1950 is offline
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Look into books on cowboy chuckwagon cooking if you are going to cook everything over an open fire. Buy a small solar oven. Look into natural techniques like "sun tea". As previously said, a .38 special revolver. I prefer .308 rifles for going up against a wild hog.

Really try to budget ONE solar power setup. living with only car battery power is going to be extremely rough. A setup like this runs about $600, give you 1200 watts daily and then you would need to pick some 12v golf cart batteries. 1200 watts available at night is going to be invaluable

https://www.renogy.com/renogy-300-wa...-solar-rv-kit/

Many good pointers on this thread

Good luck, but it is going to be hard
Wish you well

PS many people on this thread are familiar with the East Texas "Big Thicket". My retreat that I am developing now is in Cherokee County and yes, the hogs are everywhere
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:44 AM
Jroos Jroos is offline
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I'm rooting for you OP. Its not like you can't quit, walk out and start over in the city.
This is very true. If all else fails, we'll go back to living like everyone else in society. I highly doubt that is going to happen, but you never know. We're going to be preapared for every outcome, or at least do our best to get that way.

We're pretty much set on at least doing it for two or three months. A year is the goal, and I have a feeling once we're at 6 months we will be able to tell if we can make it the whole year.
My husband is an EMT, and all four of us are willing to learn from our mistakes out there. It's a huge learning experience. I think it'll be great. I probably won't think think the whole time I'm out there, but that's just life. You've given some great advice, thank you!
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Sky1950 View Post
Look into books on cowboy chuckwagon cooking if you are going to cook everything over an open fire. Buy a small solar oven. Look into natural techniques like "sun tea". As previously said, a .38 special revolver. I prefer .308 rifles for going up against a wild hog.

Really try to budget ONE solar power setup. living with only car battery power is going to be extremely rough. A setup like this runs about $600, give you 1200 watts daily and then you would need to pick some 12v golf cart batteries. 1200 watts available at night is going to be invaluable

https://www.renogy.com/renogy-300-wa...-solar-rv-kit/

Many good pointers on this thread

Good luck, but it is going to be hard
Wish you well
Thank you! We will probably all chip in for a solar power setup, and that one looks pretty good. Much appreciated.
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:55 AM
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We're going to be in Harrison County
If you have it, do some research on the wild hog population in your immediate area. Talk to neighbors and whatnot. Hunting and trapping hogs for food should be a good part of your plan. Most of East Texas has them, some more than others. With a little bit of soured corn and a cheap corral trap or a welded trap off of Craigslist you can catch enough hugs to keep you in meat.
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