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Old 10-08-2018, 05:12 PM
Measuretwice Measuretwice is offline
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Default Garden failure



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My first garden attempt is a failure.

I put up a fence to keep deer out but squirrels started to eat the plants. So I put chicken wire to keep them out. I wanted to see, that if something happened and I needed to leave the area could it grow on its own. The answer is no. So next year I will try to work once a week in the garden to see if it can grow. It is a 10 feet by 20 feet garden.
Any advice for here in Ohio?
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Old 10-08-2018, 05:25 PM
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A failure, no. Its only a failure if you give up, or dont learn anything. You learned that Mother Nature can and will unleash her furry friends to wreak havoc on your best intentions.

Trust me. We have ALL been there.

Your making plans already for next year. Thats not a failure my friend.
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Old 10-08-2018, 05:37 PM
lasers lasers is offline
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Lots of manure and compost this fall, and lots of straw mulch next summer once the plants are about 6 inches tall. In the time it takes to go from seeds to six inches tall and you add the mulch keep up on weeding the garden. Once you have the mulch down you will have many fewer weeds. Once the plants start to bush out you shouldn't have to weed more than a hand full of weeds the rest of the year. What few weeds make it through the mulch can no longer compete with the much larger plants and probably won't be a problem.

In addition to stopping the weeds the straw also helps hold in moisture. If you are in an area that gets a summer drought try tilling a bunch of charcoal to the garden beds. The charcoal absorbs and holds moisture and nutrients when the ground is wet and makes it available to the plants after the ground has begun to dry out.

To keep animals out I have seen berry gardens completely fenced and roofed in with some type of metal bird netting. I am sure that is a rather expensive option. You could also try a 2 foot tall fence that will keep the squirrels out and on top of that put a very closed space electric fence alternating with hot and ground wires.
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Old 10-08-2018, 07:59 PM
RW_in_DC RW_in_DC is offline
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Talking Fencing Out the Unwanted. ;)

What the USDA uses at their Childrens demonstration garden in the Arboretum (NY Ave & Bladensburg Ave NE, DC) is raised beds with hardware cloth nailed to to bottom to prevent groundhogs, rats or other digging pests. Hoops with covers keep out the insects, not sure about the squirrels.

Another local garden has above raised bed fencing on all outer sides and even as a “ceiling” over the other walls.

Exclusionary fencing can be as another poster commented, expensive. Cost depends on square footage in materials and your time to assemble. YMMV

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Old 10-08-2018, 10:00 PM
Kansas Terri Kansas Terri is offline
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Pay attention to the moisture pattern for your area.

Here in Kansas the small plants need to be watered weekly: the grain farmers avoid the issue by planting things like winter wheat that use the spring moisture but it is ready to harvest before the late summer because the late summer is so very dry. The wheat farmer does not care that the late summer is dry because he has already harvested.

That does not work with most vegetables, though it does with turnips. I have done it with turnips but I am not fond of turnips.

At any rate I water seedlings whenever the top inch of the soil dries out and once the vegetables are big I water any week we do not get an inch of rain. And this summer was a dry one so I watered a lot.

I believe you are trying to naturalize some vegetables. In my area garlic chives can take care of themselves AFTER they have been established and so can asparagus. I do water the asparagus the first year because any small plant will be fragile.

I do not worry about garlic chives as they have already been naturalized in my area.

This garden was not a failure for you if you learned something. I do not know about Ohio but here in Kansas the veggies need help if they are too thrive: our summers are flat out too dry. I did succeed in naturalizing asparagus but I failed to naturalize EVERY other plant that I tried, trees included.

I have bought 2 water tanks, a battery water timer, and a low-water pressure "leaky hose". So every week I can drive out with a tank of water in my pickup to transfer to the tank on my BOL and the water timer will give my plants an hour of water a day. I checked it on my back deck and it should work OK. The entire set up cost me $800 for enough quality for me to trust but my 50 gallon tank of water should last for just over a week. So if I show up with more water once a week it should work. I intend to plant trees on my BOL next spring.

In my opinion Mother Nature intended the Midwest to grow grass to feed the buffalo, not vegetables to feed us. That means that we must help the vegetables a bit.
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Old 10-09-2018, 07:02 AM
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You sure didn't fail! You merely took the first step in the "art" of gardening. It's an ongoing process of learning; what works, what doesn't and searching to find your very own "best practices".

Keep good notes each year through the gardening season. They are valuable for looking back on what did and didn't work. Use the fall to improve your soil. Use the winter to do a lot of research on ways to plant (raised bed, straight row, square foot, etc) and what to plant.

Seed catalogs! Sign up for a lot of them. Besides seeds, each one offers tidbits on how to grow things. Territorial has a great one for that. Lots of differing opinions out there on that to consider! In the end, it all comes down to what works for you in your own garden. Lots of room for trial and error. So much to learn but a lot of fun even through frustration. It's a long journey so pack some patience for the trip.

You can do this!
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Old 10-09-2018, 08:01 AM
bilmac bilmac is offline
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If you have a deer problem it sounds like you are in a lightly populated area. I have gardened almost my whole life in diverse places like Wyo,Ariz, Alaska, Oregon, and Nebr. But I still had an a learning experience when I bought an old place back here in Wyo.

There was lots of old used steel panels laying around 2'wide and various widths, so I used them to make fences for my new gardens. I went two rows high, 4' total. I was looking to keep wind damage moderated a bit. But then I was surprised to see that they also kept deer out. apparently they couldn't see over and didn't want to jump. Eventually an old doe taught them to jump in, but I countered by putting a electric fence TAPE (so they could see it) another 18" above the top of the fence. So far that has held them at bay.

I also discovered that if I kept the fence in good repair it also excluded rabbits squirrels, and hardest all coons.

Without the free steel I could never afford to put solid fences around my gardens, but if I was setting up a new mini garden for the long term, I would consider some kind of solid fencing. That also hides what you are growing from 2 legged raiders if people get hungry.
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Old 10-09-2018, 08:16 AM
RW_in_DC RW_in_DC is offline
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Talking Ideas for Ohio Garden

Quote:
Originally Posted by Measuretwice View Post
My first garden attempt is a […less than successful effort].

I put up a fence to keep deer out but squirrels started to eat the plants. […] It is a 10 feet by 20 feet garden. Any advice for here in Ohio?
I agree that dream books (aka, seed catalogs) frequently have growing tips, like the previously mentioned Territorial and “Renee’s Garden”: https://www.reneesgarden.com , etc. However, like all salespeople, they want you to buy their product/s. I’d also suggest considering perennials which grow without the annual replanting....

Too, in addition to books that are focused on your area, let me plug the Master Gardener program, Ohio’s is described here: https://mastergardener.osu.edu/about. Even if you’re not interested or able to go to the training, you can still “Ask a MG”: https://extension.osu.edu/ask-an-exp...aster-gardener.

Visit others’ gardens, both private and public, like the Secrest Arboretum: https://secrest.osu.edu, etc.

Beyond the MG program, OSU also sells books and/or PDF’s of Ohio focused agricultural topics, e.g., “The Ohio Agronomy Guide”, $15/print, $8/PDF: https://extensionpubs.osu.edu/ohio-a...-15th-edition/

You’ll find it helpful when using references that aren’t Ohio-centric to know your USDA zone: https://www.plantmaps.com/list-of-ha...hio-cities.php.

And, armed with your zone, you could consider neighboring extension info, remembering that you’ll need to check local laws against the information provided: https://extension.purdue.edu/results...sance+&x=0&y=0.
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Old 10-09-2018, 08:32 AM
Don H Don H is offline
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I had problems with deer, raccoons and squirrels tearing up the corn so I installed a woven wire fence with multiple electric wires and battery fence charger.
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Old 10-09-2018, 09:09 AM
wldwsel wldwsel is offline
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^^^^^^^^

Had an electric fence up for years. It programmed the deer (and dogs) to stay out of the garden. My back is so bad, I can't hoe weeds, but alas, fences don't help with that.

WW

shoot straight - stay safe
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Old 10-09-2018, 09:11 AM
wldwsel wldwsel is offline
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PS

Don't get discouraged. We have some good years in the garden, some GREAT years, and some fails (tomatoes last year were awful while onions were gigantic). It all works out as long as you don't give up.

WW

shoot straight - stay safe
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Old 10-09-2018, 09:14 AM
RW_in_DC RW_in_DC is offline
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Smile Urban Deer are a Real Problem :P

Quote:
Originally Posted by bilmac View Post
If you have a deer problem it sounds like you are in a lightly populated area. […]

There was lots of old used steel panels laying around 2'wide and various widths, so I used them to make fences for my new gardens. […]

Without the free steel I could never afford to put solid fences around my gardens, but if I was setting up a new mini garden for the long term, I would consider some kind of solid fencing. That also hides what you are growing from 2 legged raiders if people get hungry.
Urban deer are a real problem, see the article on the deer swimming over to Long Island NY: https://www.citylab.com/environment/...o-stay/535938/.

DC has the same issues; few predators, expensive female sterilization, lawsuits against hunters/municipalities/agencies, distaste for hunting, etc..

Finally, *no* plant is deer-proof, if the animal is hungry enough, s/he’ll eat your herbs even if it’s not with as much relish as your hostas that are their favorite “lettuces”.
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Old 10-09-2018, 09:21 AM
America's Patriot America's Patriot is offline
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If you have a problem with squirrels, moles, etc... get you a couple/few outside cats. Feed them in the morning and just enough for the daytime. You want them hungry at night so they will hunt. Squirrels, moles, pretty much everything will disappear. An outside dog will chase them off as well.

Some say spray the plants with hot pepper juice, but that doesn't really work.
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Old 10-09-2018, 01:16 PM
Measuretwice Measuretwice is offline
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Thank You all, You have given me hope, I now have some gardening homework to do this fall and winter. I hope my grandson will be more of a help in 2019.
I should have spent more time with my grandparents at the family garden instead of trying to impress girls in the 80's.
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Old 10-09-2018, 02:58 PM
BabyBlue BabyBlue is offline
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Dogs. I have a wide area around the garden that lets the dogs run all the way around it. Pretty much keeps everything out.
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Old 10-09-2018, 03:15 PM
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And that is why you need to learn BEFORE TSHTF. A "failure" now is a leaning experience, a failure then could mean your life.
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Old 10-09-2018, 04:18 PM
Kansas Terri Kansas Terri is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Measuretwice View Post
I should have spent more time with my grandparents at the family garden instead of trying to impress girls in the 80's.
Since you have grandkids it sounds like you caught at least one of those girls you were chasing, though possibly not on your first attempt. By the same measure you might not have been pleased at the results of your first gardening attempt but you will succeed if you stay at it!

A word of advice: if you decide to naturalize asparagus do NOT buy those tiny roots in baggies at the nursery: good asparagus roots run about 4 roots to the pound. After the first year you might be able to ignore them but that first year they must be watered and cared for.
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Old 10-09-2018, 06:52 PM
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Deer and coons are a big problem In the country, too. This summer, we installed a 5 foot high (2 inch x 4 inch weave) around our 1/2 acre garden and orchard. Expensive, yes, but works great. Have not had one critter eat my garden in three months.
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Old 10-10-2018, 11:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluesky9 View Post
Deer and coons are a big problem In the country, too. This summer, we installed a 5 foot high (2 inch x 4 inch weave) around our 1/2 acre garden and orchard. Expensive, yes, but works great. Have not had one critter eat my garden in three months.
The deer around here can and will jump a 6/7 foot fence as long as they can see where they will land. The trick is to make the fence hard to see through. We only have problems if a gate is left open or a fence board comes loose.
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Old 10-10-2018, 12:38 PM
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Any advice for here in Ohio?

Yep, never give up. Usually when one crop fails, U will have an abundance of another. Year after year is not the same.
I was hoping to increase my two strawberry rows to three. Nope, not happening. The berry plants just died out, nothing to transplant! Won't be any berries next year. The rows will be plowed under.
My tomatoes were awful this year. Sure, enough to can and barely eat, but not an abundance.
My cabbage plants were eaten up bye the cabbage moth larvae, no sauerkraut this year. Unless I buy from the market, and hard telling what they are injected with.
I guess my sweet corn done good, well most of it. Half fell over after every rain we got. Hmmmmm
The rutabagas were also eaten up bye the moth. The tubers looked like rotten stumps. What I did save, we were never able to cook up tender. Got a lot to learn about rutabagas.
So, looks like you have plenty of meat to eat. Raise potatoes and green beans. They both compliment venison.
Be thankful and keep on keeping on.
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