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Old 05-21-2017, 02:41 PM
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I have a wide variety of stoves I use depending on the time of year, length of the trip, and type of environment! I'm a big MSR fan! I love the XGK for big mountaineering or winter trips where you need to melt large amounts of snow for water. Plus it will burn anything available! My Whisperlight international is my go to for canoe trips. And the Superfly and Primus Micro are my lightweight backpacking stoves. But then I discovered Jetboil several years ago and use that for just about everything now!


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Old 05-21-2017, 04:08 PM
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The lightest was my old Gerry, hard to find the fuel cans now, but the stove can be converted to use other cans.



read here about stoves/fuel

http://zenstoves.net/Canister.htm

Not really light enough for backpacking but burns car gasoline nicely. I have the 2 burner one also.

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Old 05-21-2017, 05:22 PM
trekker111 trekker111 is offline
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First decision is choosing between a canister fuel, or a liquid fuel, stove. Canister fuel stoves are compact, and simple. The fuel used to be harder to find, but is now almost as common as propane at least in my area. The main draw backs to the canister butane propane blended fuel is poor performance during low temperatures and high altitude.

The main drawbacks are being tied to one fuel that is not refillable, leading to the carrying of partial cans, the disposal of empty ones, and the possibility of not being able to find fuel mid trip, which isn't much of an issue anymore.

There are lots of options in this arena, with MSR and jetboil being the biggest players. The msr pocket rocket is about as compact as they come. If you only need to heat or boil water, the jet boils are the way to go. They a super efficient, letting you carry less fuel. The only nitpick I have for them is the nesting of all the components with the fuel cans relies on the exclusive use of jetboil brand fuel cans, at least with the models I have personal experience with, because they are a different size.

I prefer liquid fuel stoves. This real is dominated by MSR, and as far as operating in the extremes, they do it. From Amazon rain forest to Antarctic expeditions and the summer of Everest, these MSR liquid fuels will do it. The already mentioned whisperlite is a great stove. It's main drawbacks is it is for the most part, either on or off. I have seen those very skilled be able to use the fuel pressure and valve to do some simmering and frying of real food, but it's not designed for it.

My personal favorite and the one I use most, is the MSR dragonfly. It has an adjustment valve on the stove that allows fine flame control, so I can fry fish I've caught, real food I brought with, etc. I do alot more than just backpacking, and actually I mostly canoe, and occasionally kayak. I also end up using it for more regular camping as well since it puts out more heat then propane for heating large amounts of water for dish washing.

Yesterday I used it to deep fry french fries for scout camp in a 3qt pot.

It is bigger than the whisperlite, but it will also run on not only Coleman fuel and gasoline like the whisperlite, and kerosene like the whisperlite international, but also diesel, and jp8 aviation fuel.

MSR makes a stove called the whisperlite universal which is basically a whisperlite international with a slight redesign to allow a canister fuel kit to be attached so it can switch from liquid fuel to canister fuel. I've never used one and I found some bad reviews about the canister connecting portion.

There is a canister fuel stove on Amazon for $9 which is alot like a MSR pocket rocket. Not the same level of quality, but hey, it's $9. I used one briefly, and it will serve 90% of backpackers well for at least a couple years.
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Old 05-21-2017, 05:23 PM
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The MSR stoves work in any weather. The little propane stoves are handy in the summer.
I used to have an Optimus 80 brass stove made in Sweden. It cost $8.95. It was similar to the Svea but had a painted blue case that doubled as a pot stand. The old brass stoves were simple, and easy to use once you had experience with them. What I really miss was the thumping jet engine noise when they were running. They were a lot of company on solo trips. I never got used to that moment when they were first turned off. The silence was over whelming.
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Old 05-21-2017, 07:19 PM
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I am a Jetboil fan. They have many models. I have the Titanium version but I don't think they make it anymore. They do have a "lite" version now called Flashlite. https://smile.amazon.com/Jetboil-Fla...ywords=jetboil
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Old 05-21-2017, 09:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_Rafe View Post
Those can't be used during fire bans. That's the whole point of the OP .

During fire bans, the only things which are allowed, are the things you can instantly shut off.
ok..the trangia is out, but the coleman is in, as it is white or unleaded gas....
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Old 05-21-2017, 10:47 PM
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the trangia simmer ring will snuff out the flame instantly.
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Old 05-22-2017, 01:59 AM
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1st off I can't believe that alcohol stoves are forbidden, are they or is that just your choice?
Just to get it said, if that old stove of yours is actually a SEVA, you should get it fixed or perhaps sell it to me!

If you still need a decent stove go to walmart and pick up a peak one canister stove, often under $24.00 (sometimes under $20.00).
Then run over to home Depot and get some aluminum roof flashing and use it to make a wind screen. Don't fully enclose the stove but surround it about 75% allowing for your cook pot size. The screen will block the breeze and reflect heat back onto the pot and fuel canister. You dot want that canister to hot, that's one reason not to fully enclose it.
If you plan to be in real cold weather a canister stove will be less efficient because the fuel does not vaporize well once the temp gets near freezing. The reflector helps to prevent that. If your can does get cold put the canister in a plate of liquid water and it will work fine. Insulate the bottom and the reflector/screen will do the rest to keep it warm.
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Old 05-22-2017, 01:32 PM
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Quote:
...go to walmart and pick up a peak one canister stove...sometimes under $20.00...
Those are pretty decent & very affordable little stoves. I keep one inside each vehicle emergency kit. Most canister stoves are pretty functional, varying only in minor features, weights, bulk. We all have favorites, but they are pretty simple & functional devices.

Over in Europe/Asia/Africa, GAZ Bluet brand fills the same niche and work like champs. Again for very little money. Perfect for all but extreme winter or high altitude.
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Old 05-22-2017, 02:13 PM
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I have used a lot of camp stoves. All mentioned above, and all are very nice.
Recently I found these, and they are amazing for the money.

https://www.amazon.com/Gearupz-Cookw.../dp/B01LXZAXLV

I got mine for around $5.99 each, and they are cheaper when you order more. Make great Christmas prepper gifts, birthdays, weddings, you name it.
Hard to beat for the cost...
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Old 05-22-2017, 02:21 PM
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Although I have moved to a gas canister stove, I used an MSR Whisperlight for many years and was always happy with it. Priming was kind of a pain and, due to the convenience of the newer gas canister type stoves, I now use one of them for almost everything. Mine is a Snow Peak with the piezo igniter which is extremely convenient. Open the stove, screw it on the canister, open the valve and click the ignitor. Poof...instant fire.

At very high altitudes (Above 10,000 ft) or in very cold temperatures (below freezing), I would still want to use a white gas stove. But, most of the time the canister stove is a very simple, lightweight, and convenient answer.
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Old 05-22-2017, 02:44 PM
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Good review worth reading of various backpacking stove systems.

http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/topics...kpacking-stove
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Old 05-22-2017, 04:21 PM
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Exclamation MSR week link

All you MSR fanatics may want to rethink your options. First night at winter camp, Wisperlite International fuel bottle was inadvertantly dropped about 3 feet onto hard surface with pump attached, Pump operating rod instantly snapped rendering the stove unuseable for the remainder of the trip. Fortunately had the old reliable SVEA as a backup, so from now on MSR with replacement pump will only be carried as an addittional stove, not my primary.
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Old 05-22-2017, 05:16 PM
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You could just dump the gas on your sock.
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Old 05-22-2017, 05:19 PM
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I just rethought my options... and decided to keep my Whisperlites (3 of them) and the XGK.

First night at -72F windchill in hurricane force winds, dug into a snowy tent camp... only 2 out of 11 stoves in my party performed without issue. Both were MSR Whisperlites. All the others (including two SVEA 123s & a couple of Optimus models) crapped out; either wouldn't pressurize, light, or stay lit under ferociously bad conditions inside of snow pits. Snowshoe movement, Mt. Washington, February. The kind of extreme temps where mechanical devices start to fail due to embrittlement. Including steel weapons.

My original 1st Generation Whisperlite from 1984 is still my go to stove after being drug all over the world. Still using the original stove, pump, and fuel bottles.

When you drop stuff, things sometimes break. Happens with everything. Don't drop plastic bits connected to weight when they're cold.

I've carried mine inside of an MSR Stowaway stainless steel alpine cook pot for over 32 years. Inside of that protective container, those stoves have been impacted by countless rucksack tumbles, dropped from hovering helos, crushed inside of loads on military pallets, bounced around truck beds in rocky deserts, rolled with rucks tumbling down scree slopes, or just endured my epic biffs when wiping out on touring skis or snow machines. Never a problem.

My 32 year old Whisperlite is one the few reliable bits of gear I've not yet managed to destroy across the decades.
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Old 05-22-2017, 06:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erobbins1 View Post
the trangia simmer ring will snuff out the flame instantly.
The point of the fire ban is generally to avoid accidents. A gas stove (or liquid fuel stove with a canister) can tip, and you can shut it off. If a Trangia tips over (i agree, very unlikely), it spills the liquid and that can cause tons of trouble.

I'm a big fan of alcohol stoves, i almost exclusively use one when hiking, but i can see why you wouldn't want to use it in a fire prone environment either. If you're safe you always clear the place where you have your fire (whether it's an actual fire, alcohol stove, gas stove) and make sure that any spillage wouldn't set anything on fire. Unfortunately you can't rely on people actually doing that, as evident by the amount of forest fires which start due to campfires or similar, so they forbid everything which can spill and go out of control.
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Old 05-22-2017, 09:52 PM
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Not ultralight & a little big/heavy.
533 duel-fuel Coleman's
Durable, dependable & really throw high BTU's.

I can cook gourmet meals with one.
2 & a DIY take apart grate, I can quickly cook large meals for a fair sized group.

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Old 05-22-2017, 10:44 PM
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I've given kudos to Bunkerbuster for that DIY grill on other threads. Well... I'm doing it again. After seeing his, I built a nearly identical one (mine has extra leg sections that thread onto connectors to raise height). Just an outstanding idea for car camping, fireplace cooking, backyard grill work, etc. It's my #1 solution for cooking over a wood fire place. Wife loves it.

When not needed, it can be slipped inside closet or kitchen cabinets to function as a really heavy duty shelf for pots, pans, and cast iron cookware. Or broken down for storage inside of a camp kitchen box.

And (obviously), you can slip just about any sized/fueled stove underneath it for a big cooking area.

Inexpensive, adaptable, super sturdy, easy to assemble, and easy to disassemble for storage.
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Old 05-22-2017, 11:33 PM
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Coleman dual fuel. Bomb proof and won't let you down

https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-Guide...SIN=B0009PUQAU
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Old 05-22-2017, 11:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stinky View Post
Just to get it said, if that old stove of yours is actually a SEVA, you should get it fixed or perhaps sell it to me!
It should be donated freely (I take free donation off all kinds)
IMO Svea 123 operation are just too dangerous for current days younger generation anyway, not to mention the priming flame & noise of the stove would severely disturbed the peace of the forest (it might create uncontrolled wild fire)
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