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Old 10-13-2019, 03:55 PM
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I so wish I could've planted broccoli and cauliflower! The heads I got in my CSA box have been pretty small. Oh well.
Well, the cauliflower is my fourth and last attempt at this vegetable that doesn't like this climate. Someone told me about this 'Amazing' variety and it started making small heads in spring before the temps started seesawing and ruined them. Better to do in the fall so this is it... the last hurrah. Hopefully a hurrah!
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Old 10-14-2019, 02:26 PM
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I have had no luck with cauliflower whatsoever....this year planted 16 "Cheddar" cauliflower, only 1 made a very small, weird looking head. Wish I knew the secret to how they grow the huge heads in supermarket!
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Old 10-14-2019, 03:42 PM
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I have had no luck with cauliflower whatsoever....this year planted 16 "Cheddar" cauliflower, only 1 made a very small, weird looking head. Wish I knew the secret to how they grow the huge heads in supermarket!
Don't feel bad. I can't see what part of the country you're in but temperature seems to be a huge factor. If you search online for "growing cauliflower" you'll find a lot of information labeling cauliflower as a difficult and temperamental critter because of temperature. A sample:

"The main thing to remember is that the plant thrives in temperatures around 60-65 F. (16-18 C.) and no higher than 75 F. (24 C.). Of all the cole crops, cauliflower is the most sensitive to temperature. When temperatures exceed 75 F., the plants have a tendency to button or bolt. The best time to plant most varieties of cauliflower is in the spring so they grow and produce their flower heads before summerís hot temperatures ramp up. Other varieties are suited for mid-summer planting for a fall harvest.

Source: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edi...auliflower.htm

I can't grow cauliflower in the spring because here it warms early and bounces back and forth between real cold and real warm spells. The plant "buttons", growing just a plum sized head. The best chance here is the fall but planted late to avoid fall temp swings. Most times that still doesn't work.

Like I said, this is the laaaaaaaaast time. And yes, I've said that before but I just *hate* to admit defeat.
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Old 10-14-2019, 09:14 PM
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Today was the last big planting day of the year.

Last night we finally got some rain, about 7/10". Wowsa! Still, in some beds only the top inch or so of soil was moist so I'm glad I did my "watered trenches" bed prep method yesterday. And I'm glad I prepped yesterday. Getting beds ready and planting on the same day is way too much to do.

So, what went in today?

Garlic: 9' each of Russian Inferno and Siberian, two new-to-me garlics, 7' of Shilla and 8' of Maiskij. A total of 78 cloves. There was 3' left at the end of one bed side so I'll toss some beet seed in there tomorrow. Pre-chilling the bulbs was this year's experiment. They've had 10 weeks at 43-45 degrees.

Onions: 10' of Australian Brown (intermediate day) and 8' of Creole Red (short day). The last time I planted the Creole it bolted due to spring temp swings. Short day onions are recommended for this area. But the intermediate day Aussies haven't bolt at all. Well, just a little one year but not like the Creoles. Last chance for the Creoles. Maybe just pull and use them early.

Carrots: 9' of Tendersweet and 9' of Yaya on one side of the bed and 10' of Bolero, 4' of Danvers and 4' of Napoli on the other. Just using up the last seed of some varieties.

Scallions: 6' each of Shimonita, Warrior and new-to-me Huek Geum Jang. That last is something I bought at the Korean grocery in town. Can't read anything on the pack!




Turnips: 10' of Gang Hwa, another Korean thing I bought. There's already 18' of good old Purple Tops that were seeded on the other side of the bed two weeks ago.

Daikon radishes: To finish out that Korean turnip row, 4' of Cheong du Gold (Korean and new to me) and 2' each of Gauljeojang and Minowase, ones I've done before. Two fat kinds and one long skinny kind.

Tomorrow I just need to plant that 3' of beet seed and some regular radishes (French Breakfast and Opolanka) and I'm planting done for the year.
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Old 10-16-2019, 09:02 PM
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The last few little things have been planted. DONE! And we got a half inch of rain last night to water things in. Most of the rain passed south of us but we'll gladly take what we were given and are grateful for it.

This is the final fall map. For years I have tortured spreadsheets into submission for the task. Overkill? Maybe, but it keeps me organized.

It's to scale with each square being 1'. When I started planning for fall I had to do some general spring planning first, taking crop rotation into consideration. And it also wouldn't do to plant something in the fall that will grow long into spring (like collards and kale) in a bed where something real early like peas is supposed to go! A little note of what's going into the beds in spring is noted in each bed on the map to remind me.

Under each bed I keep what has been grown in that bed to help me with crop rotation. The dark blue boxes in each bed remind me which beds have been forked.







So now the garden is in maintenance mode. One of these days I'll have to sit down and look at this past spring and summer and see what worked, what didn't, lessons learned and new methods to try. All of this is much more fun than going to the movies!
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Old 10-16-2019, 10:44 PM
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I use similar grids to plan out my garden beds and, like you, 1 square = 1'. I always print them out and keep them in my gardening binder, for future reference.
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Old 10-17-2019, 12:27 AM
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Impressive!!
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Old 10-17-2019, 06:57 AM
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Not a drop. Not even any cloud that looked like it wanted to cry! But I'm glad you got some, even if it was just a little. Better than none.
We FINALLY got some decent rain with that last little push first of the week. The worst went right below us, but we got SOME relief anyway.
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Old 10-19-2019, 07:38 AM
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It's raining! A tropical thing called Nestor. Nestor... really? Never heard of the name. Oh well, I'm just thankful for the rain.

The fall garden is coming along with earlier plantings really loving the cooler weather. When the temps dropped they almost immediately started responding.

This is the bed with two staggered plantings of four 'Amazing' cauliflower on the left end and six 'Packman' broccoli on the right. The older ones were planted out on 9/18 and the newbies went in 10/11.



The Contender beans are blooming and I see tiny green beans the size of toothpicks on them. Every evening I let down the deer netting on each side of the two bean beds and every morning I raise it up so the pollinators get in there to do their thing. Skipper butterflies seem to like the bean flowers. The Jade and Strike beans are a bit behind the Contenders.



I had forgotten to assign a space to the scallions! Looking at last year's fall map it appeared I put scallions along the edge of what would be a spring corn bed. If the scallions aren't gone before it's time to plant circles of corn, they won't interfere. One of the spring corn beds has spiny cukes in it now and they're almost done so I raked the vines aside a bit and stuck in the scallions. Mission accomplished. Three varieties; Warrior, Shimonita and a new one I got at the Korean grocery. Can't read the name but the picture on the pack looks nice.



Finally, I had a visitor to the declining zinnias; a Monarch butterfly! I've never seen one in the garden before. It was absolutely gorgeous.




Although they supposedly migrate to Mexico for the winter, I read where there's an overwintering population somewhere in Florida. I hope this one tanked up enough for the long journey, whichever direction it's heading!
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Old 10-19-2019, 10:41 AM
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Finally, I had a visitor to the declining zinnias; a Monarch butterfly! I've never seen one in the garden before. It was absolutely gorgeous.
Great pic!

There was a Monarch butterfly at my marigolds yesterday. But when I tried to get close enough to take a pic, it got spooked and flew off. I hoped it would just circle around and come back, but no luck. Last I saw, it was flying over the rooftops to the south of me.
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Old 10-19-2019, 03:11 PM
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Weedinhoe, i have had trouble with cauli no matter where i lived (zone 4 or zone 8a). I am now in GA and rely heavily on my winter garden to supply my brassica. I researched & found a supposed "winter" cauliflower seed, bred for overwintering in the past, but if water is inconsistent, it will still pour and make dinky heads, or none at all. I usually end up eating the greens instead. No problem, I have plenty of other brassica that does last all winter. Kale even grew in zone 4 in the snow! How much more it loves georgia winters. Summers are the bad season for me - nothing survives but okra, sweet potatoes and peppers! No problem, I use early spring (plant in march, harvest by July when the heat starts up) as a bonus season for short season varieties of crops that cant handle heat OR cold. I just can/freeze/dehydrate year round to keep our supply of vegetables somewhat balanced. Love your pics of your gardens. This rain today, steady and gentle, has been long needed. Our winter garden is 50% in - the tranplants of broccoli, cabbage, kale, collards, lettuce, mustard greens & bok choy are in, and the seeds for spinach, carrots, green onions, turnips and succession plantings of radishes & lettuce are waiting for the rain to pass. My mouth is already watering!
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Old 10-20-2019, 09:28 AM
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Weedinhoe, i have had trouble with cauli no matter where i lived (zone 4 or zone 8a). I am now in GA and rely heavily on my winter garden to supply my brassica...I have plenty of other brassica that does last all winter. Kale even grew in zone 4 in the snow! How much more it loves georgia winters.
Welcome to Georgia! Brassicas do indeed do well here in the winter. The kale and collards out there now would last well into summer but with loss of tenderness and a stronger taste. That means I will set out new plants in February and when they're ready to start cutting on in late March, the old ones will come out.

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Summers are the bad season for me - nothing survives but okra, sweet potatoes and peppers!
Have you tried field peas (also called cow peas or southern peas) for summer? They love the heat! Just to give you a frame of reference for timing in case you wanted to do some: I planted some in a bed in June on 6/7, with the first picking 7/30. The large patch of Big Red Rippers went in on 7/19 where the corn rows were and the first picking from them came on 9/25. So easy to either can or freeze.
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Old 10-20-2019, 12:54 PM
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We ended up with 2.2" of rain in the gauge from TS Nestor and not a puddle in sight anywhere. The ground just sucked it all right up! No real wind at all, which is a good thing.

This morning's garden patrol showed more deer munch in the field peas. They're doing the edges only. I wonder if they don't like getting hooves tangled up in vines when they try to get to the middle of the bed.



They've also started on the outside of the trellised peas and fortunately got the puny plants on the left side last night. The right side has some really nice fat seed pods that I want to collect when they dry so they need protection. Salvaged Magic Curtain panels and clothespins to the rescue! There were enough to cover the very area I wanted to save. They have also come in handy in the past for various other garden projects like shade, etc). Like I said, "Ya make it up as ya go along."



Recently planted things are coming up. The Asian turnips and daikon radishes were up a few days ago. Now the beets and regular radishes (French Breakfast, Opolanka) are up. Then there's the first... garlic!



That's Shilla (of Korean origin), one of four varieties planted and from the bulbs I harvested in May. This is only six days after I planted them 4" deep and at planting the cloves showed no evidence of trying to sprout. But then my records from the past three falls shows that's about how fast they've always come up so I guess it's not unusual. I need to mulch them this afternoon with wheat straw.

And finally, even little things flowers are pretty, even Contender beans.

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Old 10-21-2019, 12:33 PM
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There have been hardly any fire ant mounds around lately until the big rain two days ago. It's been too dry for them to be active but now that the ground is moist, here they come. Time for "Death From Above", gallon jugs of water with 1/4 cup of dish washing liquid mixed in each, one jug per mound. Two jugs if it's a big mound.



Slowly poured from about 4-5', the mix pounds down into the mounds and disappears into the ground. It doesn't kill the colony (not much does) but it will kill a bunch and they'll have to relocate. With cats around I don't want any Amdro or similar ant bait getting licked off their paws. But this soap mix is veggie plant friendly and so it's good for getting any mounds that pop up inside garden beds.

The cabbages are loving the cooler weather. Those are some Stonehead at the top and Charleston Wakefield at the bottom. Both are just starting to wrap. There's deer netting over them and all other brassica beds.



This is a sample of one of the Big Red Ripper pods I'm keeping the deer from. This one has a way to go to dry out.



I think I might be able to make the first light picking of Contender beans tomorrow. Oh boy!
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Old 10-22-2019, 11:04 AM
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Default Fall Potato Planting Experiment

Iím trying a fall potato planting method I read about. Itís just an experiment with three hills, two of which are Yukon Gold and one is Red Pontiac. These are sprouty potatoes, the last from this springís harvest.

Basically you put in a layer of mulch (old leaves, grass clippings, etc), the potato, more mulch and top with soil in an 8-10Ē hole. It supposedly gives the roots a big head start during the winter and results in an earlier harvest.

Hereís the full article:
https://www.backwoodshome.com/plant-...all-or-winter/
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Old 10-23-2019, 04:28 PM
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A lot got done in the garden this morning. Clean Up Day.

The four fall tomatoes in buckets got moved to pallets on the sunny side of the garden and I took up the old pallets they had been sitting on. Fire ants had started a mound in one of the buckets. That's the first time ever and it's probably because there had been no tarp put over the pallets.

Speaking of pallets, while I was dealing with soaping the ants I heard 5th Gear laughing and hollering for me to come look. She was busy taking down the tomatoes on pallets by the house. Lo and behold, she had discovered a possum party in one of the pallets! She pulled the tarp off and there they were, three of them squeezed in side by side between pallet top and bottom, taking a snooze!



5th Gear had to upend the pallet to dump out the possums and they scattered, leaving a nice cozy little nest of leaves and pine straw they had made. Never a dull moment!



Back at the garden, the broccoli plants were pushing up against the deer netting so I deployed some hoop extenders I had rigged up two years ago for big old field peas.



The 1/2" hoops normally fit inside 17" lengths of 3/4" pvc pipe pushed into the ground as anchors. To make it all taller I had cut some lengths of 1x1's and tapered one end down to where the end would fit into the 3/4" pipe. Wood into the ground, 3/4" on top of that and hoop end into the 3/4" pipe. It was too high so I just pushed the wood pieces 6" farther into the soil and that fixed the problem. The cauliflowers at the other end of the bed are short enough not to need taller hoops.

More ants... this time building in a corner of the turnip bed. Death From Above coming in the form of a jug of soap water.



The pea plants have been pulled and pea fence rolled up until spring. They just didn't perform well. It was just too hot early in their life.

There were a few small garlic cloves left over from garlic planting so I stuck them in their own space; 7 Siberians and 14 Russian Infernos.

I am out of pipe anchors for deer netting hoops and I need to cover the turnip bed. There were hoof prints in that bed this morning and fortunately no baby turnip greens munched. There's some old black irrigation pipe of various sizes out back in the possibles pile so I'll see if there's anything I can cut and use.

Finally, we had an awesome sunset last night. October and November have the prettiest ones of the year.

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Old 10-24-2019, 12:27 AM
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Too bad about the possums, they probably thought they were set for the winter.

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Finally, we had an awesome sunset last night. October and November have the prettiest ones of the year.

That really is a beautiful pic!
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Old 10-24-2019, 09:22 AM
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Too bad about the possums, they probably thought they were set for the winter.
Oh, they're out and about all winter long here. They've made all kinds of tunnels in that big brush pile (Mt. Brushmore) so I'm sure they have all kinds of sleeping spots down there. And it's probably a bit cozy with a little warmth from decomposing stuff.

These fall sunsets are really something! And it's rare when they're that pretty here any other time of year. Must be something about the angle of the sun and the kinds of clouds that arrive that time of day.
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Old 10-27-2019, 08:12 AM
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The days are getting shorter. It doesn't seem long ago that I could escape the heat of the day by playing in the garden until 9pm. Now 7pm is about it but there's really no need to since the hot weather is gone. Thank goodness!

The garden is pretty much on cruise control right now. The deer will have to do without. I put deer netting on the last bed which has the turnips and daikon radishes in it and am glad I remembered how the deer like both of those.



I've picked a bit over a pound of Contender green beans so far (above, right). The Jade and Strike beans are still just thinking about turning flowers to beans.

Two of the four garlic varieties (ones grown here last year) have all poked up through the mulch but none of the new ones I bought have yet.

We had 1/4" of rain last night. The carrot seeds have finally come up so this rain will make them happy. The carrots have been planted down the sides of one bed. There are 9' each of Tendersweet and Yaya on one side with 10' of Bolero, 4' each of Danvers and Napoli on the other side.

I think this year's cabbage plants are the largest I've ever grown. They survived the heat of September and early October with some shade put over them and now they're going crazy in the cooler weather. Some of the cabbages are starting to wrap. This is Charleston Wakefield followed by Stonehead:





And finally, I've been smelling something in the air in the garden. Something sweet. Yesterday I figured it out. It's the Fragrant Tea Olive (Osmanthus fragrans) near the bottom of the garden. It's in full bloom!


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Old 10-27-2019, 10:55 PM
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Gorgeous autumn garden !
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