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Old 12-22-2013, 07:43 PM
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Originally Posted by kev View Post
No power at field location.

Well, there are power lines that run near the field, but to go all electric is not feasible.
Not to mention in a SHTF situation, you probably won't have power anyway. Good thinking IMO.
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Old 12-22-2013, 07:52 PM
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That looks good to me. If you do plan on putting a horse in I'd use an electric wire on top instead of barbed wire. The welded wire is far superior and is smooth on both sides so as not to scrape and tear horse skin, yet it will last decades and keep goats from nosing through it.

One change that we made in cross braces is using a 3" to 4" piece of galvanized pipe 6-8' long between the posts. It doesn't have to be heavy pipe. And we use 3/4" pipe to twist the cross brace tight.After using wood all my previous life and watching it rot out this seems a good choice. Railroad ties are the uprights that we use. For the price you can't beat them.

I see that video is using pipe between the posts.
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Old 12-22-2013, 08:01 PM
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Originally Posted by REM View Post
I see that video is using pipe between the posts.
I am here in Central Texas and have the metal bars between the posts at our place (done long before I ever bought it) and those around us. Don't know if this is just a regional thing or related to available materials.

Where do you get your railroad ties?
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Old 12-22-2013, 08:43 PM
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Most of the farm type stores and some regular building materials stores here carry used railroad ties.

I never really thought about it, but I guess that it's common closer to railroad lines where abandoned rail lines are pulled up and/or railroad track maintenance occurs.

The ties are heavy and are difficult to work with, but once you get them set they will probably outlive you.
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Old 12-22-2013, 10:17 PM
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I built fence with good quality used railroad ties. They lasted about 15 years and had to be replaced because of rot. Texas may be dryer.
Charlie
Mid Missouri
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Old 12-22-2013, 10:42 PM
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I have seen ties that were really old, cdevier. They had very little creosote left. I've never bought any. I could see these as short lived.

The ones that we are able to buy are darned new looking and the oldest are ones I sank in 1975. They're still rocking. Heavy as all get out, but they are very solid.

Most of that time was fairly wet. We've turned droughty the last 8 years, or so.

The best of the best are split catalpa posts. I still have several standing and several that I've taken up and saved that my grandfather sunk back before I was born. He died in 1973.
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Old 12-23-2013, 12:08 AM
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This has been quite interesting to me as I would never have dreamed that one could contain goats in such a short fence. Growing up our fences were a minimum of 7 feet high and our goats could jump it when they wanted to. Mostly only the buck would do this as the does normally couldn't be bothered unless they saw something especially tasty on the other side. Breed of goat may have a lot to do with this as well, but I'm still surprised that most goats wouldn't just jump a 4 foot fence/gate. When we first got goats we bought one that was carrying triplets (and due within days) and she jumped the 4-foot stall my dad had her in - our goats just must have always been jumpers....
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Old 12-23-2013, 02:25 AM
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Steel brace beams would be a no-brainer if you got a source for them and don't mind paying for them.

Don't forget a wire twister. I use something very similar to this:



Cost only a couple bucks but sure does make life easier connecting fence to the end posts. If you're using that non-climb fence you will have twice as many wires to twist so more the reason.

Also don't forget some 9 AWG wire for wiring up your brace posts. I connect diagonally, the top part of the brace post and the bottom part of the end post in a big loop, then put a stout wood rod in there and twist until its good and tight.



For a gate post, you want to have two bracing wires, in an X pattern, to support the weight of the gate:



Also need to think about a way to pin the brace beam to the post. I start by using my small chainsaw to make a flat spot on the two posts. Then I drill some holes and use 3/8" rebar. One post will have to be drilled all the way through, the other only halfway through. Or you can drill them both all the way through. I have also used 3/8" steel spikes, but the rebar is cheaper.

Edit:
Disclaimer the above pics are not mine, I just googled for them.
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Old 12-23-2013, 06:43 AM
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This has been quite interesting to me as I would never have dreamed that one could contain goats in such a short fence. Growing up our fences were a minimum of 7 feet high and our goats could jump it when they wanted to. Mostly only the buck would do this as the does normally couldn't be bothered unless they saw something especially tasty on the other side. Breed of goat may have a lot to do with this as well, but I'm still surprised that most goats wouldn't just jump a 4 foot fence/gate. When we first got goats we bought one that was carrying triplets (and due within days) and she jumped the 4-foot stall my dad had her in - our goats just must have always been jumpers....
I've never seen a goat jump that high. Are you sure that they didn't climb over? They are adept climbers.

That's why I place an upper run of barbed wire behind and a couple of inches from the top of the field fence, so that it will not lean between posts. The lean is what makes it easy for a goat to climb over. The barbs on the wire make it dig in and hold the field fence. They cannot climb straight up in my experience, but a lean will do it for them.
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kev View Post
No power at field location.

Well, there are power lines that run near the field, but to go all electric is not feasible.
Why not just get a solar-powered electric fence energiser?

This looks fine, however:
http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...-fence-42-in-h
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kev View Post
No power at field location.

Well, there are power lines that run near the field, but to go all electric is not feasible.
We use a solar electric fence unit. Capable of 60k Volts, plenty of juice to keep the largest of critters off the fence. Our horses don't even challenge it.
It has worked well for over 2 yrs, only 4+ days without sunshine causes us to unhook it and take it home overnight for a charge.

Also the poly tape doesn't last IMHO, we went with smooth wire 3 strand for horses only. You can get some of the orange plastic type tape (like crime scene stuff) and make little flags for the smooth wire for the animals to see it. How we taught the horses where the perimeter was.
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:35 AM
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I just ran 350' of horse fence for our horse and future livestock. I did only use 48" high horse wire from tractor supply plus 6.5 T post. I still have another 1000' to go. But With our horse he is a pawer so he stomps his hooves on the ground and barb wire, slick wire or hot wire was no good. He cut his hoof area and cost us a couple of grand in vet bills. To say the least my horse doesn't even go close to the new wire horse fencing, he doesn't even try to lean over it but he does get fed, has water and shade so he has been great. Also remember to cap your t post so your horse doesn't cut their neck on the post to scratch. Couple more things welded wire sucks doesn't stretch been there done that. Also remember all animals have different behavior patterns like humans so what works for one might not work for the other, done that too. Good luck, also you can make a fence stretcher with a few different things if you have it lying around, we did and it's fine.
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Old 12-23-2013, 02:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REM View Post
I've never seen a goat jump that high. Are you sure that they didn't climb over? They are adept climbers.

That's why I place an upper run of barbed wire behind and a couple of inches from the top of the field fence, so that it will not lean between posts. The lean is what makes it easy for a goat to climb over. The barbs on the wire make it dig in and hold the field fence. They cannot climb straight up in my experience, but a lean will do it for them.
The fence was straight up, and not leaning, but yes it seems ridiculous that a goat could jump that high. I did track the goats on occasion after they escaped to ensure the fence wasn't damaged (I grew up in moose territory which can be hard on fences, and normally if the does escaped it meant something had put a hole in the fence somewhere), and I remember one time in the middle of winter tracking the buck to see where he escaped....tracks leading up to the fence and then tracks on the other side of the fence and the snow on the fence not even touched (so he couldn't have used the fence as a ladder without leaving tracks in the snow on the fence). Maybe we should have seen if they were eligible for the Guinness Book of World Records lol.

I didn't mean to sidetrack the conversation however. It just never occurred to me that goats could be so easily contained. They are very much herd creatures though, so having other animals in there should make them more inclined to stay within the fence (ie. if the horses don't escape, the goats will be more likely to stay with them). The bucks were also always far more likely to jump the fence than the does were; does normally only escaped through the fence when it got damaged (but we had a fence far taller than the 4 feet which my family quickly learned they could and would jump with ease). I just know that ours could be escape artists, and would go through any gap in the fence and even over it if they decided our trees/garden was appealing enough....or just open the bolt with their teeth and let themselves out (yeah, bolts were not effective locks at all with our goats).
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Old 12-23-2013, 06:35 PM
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i used the tubular gates cause they are cheaper than the mesh gates and then i use chicken wire or welded wire fence that i twist tie to the tubular gate. That way the chickens and goats can't get thru it. Much cheaper way of doing it rather than buying mesh gates from the store.
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Old 12-23-2013, 11:16 PM
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I have installed several miles of fence in the last three years. I use regular 42" field fence, with a single strand of barbed wire, making the barrier 48" to 50". I have goats and donkeys enclosed now, but hope to add cows when I can find a bargain on a small herd. I use the mesh gates like you pictured in the OP. Works well for goats. Most of the field fence has the smaller rectangles down low, and larger at the top. Somehow, they slipped in a few rolls with the large rectangles from top to bottom. In three years, I have never had a goat get caught in one. I bought a fence unroller/stretcher from TS, and it turned out to be a very good purchase, especially if you are using hired labor. It easily replaces one man, and maybe two. Just makes the job easier, quicker, and more efficient. Makes stretching a snap, and a good tight stretch is very important. I sink my corner posts 42" deep, with about 1/3 bag of sakrete. I build a good strong brace, and let it set up for a while before stretching. I space t-posts at 10 feet, with a wooden post every 100 feet. Most of my fence runs are long, straight, and level, which simplifies things. Bracing is extremely important. I think, in my soil anyhow, the sakrete is important. As you see, we lay out the fence line with a string and put up all the posts, braces, etc, then stretch the wire.

Some pictures:



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Old 12-23-2013, 11:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarco2000 View Post
Also need to think about a way to pin the brace beam to the post.
There's no need to pin it. I'll try to take some photos in the next few days and show you how we do it here.
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Old 12-24-2013, 11:10 AM
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Originally Posted by levelfarmer View Post
I have installed several miles of fence in the last three years. I use regular 42" field fence, with a single strand of barbed wire, making the barrier 48" to 50". I have goats and donkeys enclosed now, but hope to add cows when I can find a bargain on a small herd. I use the mesh gates like you pictured in the OP. Works well for goats. Most of the field fence has the smaller rectangles down low, and larger at the top. Somehow, they slipped in a few rolls with the large rectangles from top to bottom. In three years, I have never had a goat get caught in one. I bought a fence unroller/stretcher from TS, and it turned out to be a very good purchase, especially if you are using hired labor. It easily replaces one man, and maybe two. Just makes the job easier, quicker, and more efficient. Makes stretching a snap, and a good tight stretch is very important. I sink my corner posts 42" deep, with about 1/3 bag of sakrete. I build a good strong brace, and let it set up for a while before stretching. I space t-posts at 10 feet, with a wooden post every 100 feet. Most of my fence runs are long, straight, and level, which simplifies things. Bracing is extremely important. I think, in my soil anyhow, the sakrete is important. As you see, we lay out the fence line with a string and put up all the posts, braces, etc, then stretch the wire.
Great pics. Can you provide a better pic of that yellow thing on the back of your tractor to unroll the fence? I welded up one out of 1" pipe and it lasted the season before it finally broke and I need to improve it.
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Old 12-24-2013, 11:39 AM
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http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...ence-stretcher

This is the item I said replaces at least one, and possibly two men. I believe it was probably $100 less than this price when I bought mine three or so years ago. I know the price of posts, fencing, and gates went up considerably over the period I did my fencing.
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Old 12-24-2013, 11:53 AM
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This is the item I said replaces at least one, and possibly two men. I believe it was probably $100 less than this price when I bought mine three or so years ago. I know the price of posts, fencing, and gates went up considerably over the period I did my fencing.
Yes I agree, without something like this you would have to unroll the fence by kicking it along the ground and it adds a lot of time.

I think I have a new welding project for over the winter
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Old 12-24-2013, 06:43 PM
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I have installed several miles of fence in the last three years....
I forgot to mention, you have some nice looking grass!
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