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Old 11-22-2013, 10:57 PM
Rusty Survivor Rusty Survivor is offline
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Default Exactly what I was looking for



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Your stoves are awesome and exactly what I was looking for. I appreciate all the time you obviously spent working on these. Do you have any plans for a larger version?
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Old 11-23-2013, 09:12 AM
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Your stoves are awesome and exactly what I was looking for. I appreciate all the time you obviously spent working on these. Do you have any plans for a larger version?
I'm glad you like it . Truth is, I couldn't find a "real" wood gas burner, so I made my own.

Sorry, but no, I don't have any plans for a larger version. What are you looking for in your stove? Lemme know and I'll help any way I can.

k.
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Old 11-24-2013, 01:50 PM
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Thank you so much KarlOS. Was a bit confused by the screw, but the video helped clear that up.

But I do have a couple of questions. I understand the safety can opener for the paint can, but can't I just use a regular can opener for the tuna and soup cans? I didn't see where the "lids" that are formed would be used again. But one idea I had was saving those lids, putting another screw in them and then screwing candles on for a light source as needed. Or is that even possible?
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Old 11-25-2013, 08:43 AM
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Thank you so much KarlOS. Was a bit confused by the screw, but the video helped clear that up.

But I do have a couple of questions. I understand the safety can opener for the paint can, but can't I just use a regular can opener for the tuna and soup cans? I didn't see where the "lids" that are formed would be used again. But one idea I had was saving those lids, putting another screw in them and then screwing candles on for a light source as needed. Or is that even possible?
The primary reason for the screw is to hold the combustion chamber to the base. It can also be used to attach a "Ranger Burner" to the inside of the stove.

-Side Note-

What's a "Ranger Burner" you ask? Simple. It's a buddy burner made from wax (soy or beeswax), rolled cardboard and a regular soup can (the one with the red and white label). Pop a small hole in the bottom of the can and you can screw it directly to the bottom of the Mountain Ranger - light it and use it. My plan is to do a video on "Ranger Burners" so you can see how they work in my stoves.

-End Side Note-

If you remove the lids on the tuna can and soup can with a safety can opener they can be reused. The soup can lid can be used to help snuff out the fire in the stove, if, for example, you're burning wood pellets and don't want to waste fuel. You can also use it if you choose to have your stove pre-filled with fuel. Simply use a Ranger Band to keep it in place.

The the lid for the tuna can can be used in conjunction with the tuna can as a separate, stand alone stove for solid fuel tabs or a small alcohol stove. In fact, the last part of the third video shows a preview of the stove I created from this configuration called the "Pocket Ranger". It's not quite ready for prime-time, but I'm shooting some raw video for it right now.

I hope I answered your questions. If there's anything else I can help you with, lemme know.

KarlOS
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Old 12-06-2013, 07:56 PM
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Hi, I love your stove. I have commented on your video before. I'm a newbie in this forum and I can't think of five interesting things to post right now, so I can't PM you, but I would really appreciate a copy of your diagram. Would you mind PMing me? Thank you!
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Old 12-06-2013, 08:19 PM
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81eagle 81eagle is offline
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Looks like a great stove. I posted not only to say well done, but to save so I can find the post.
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Old 12-06-2013, 08:39 PM
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Hi, I love your stove. I have commented on your video before. I'm a newbie in this forum and I can't think of five interesting things to post right now, so I can't PM you, but I would really appreciate a copy of your diagram. Would you mind PMing me? Thank you!
Hi Teifi,

I can't PM you until you have posted 5 times. One post you can make is in the Introduction Forum. You'll get responses, which you should reply to, and you'll probably have your 5 posts in no time. (I'll watch to help you out.)

And thank you for commenting on my stove. Keep watching, I have more on the way...

k.
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Old 12-09-2013, 08:09 PM
Teifi Teifi is offline
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Default First attempt at Mountain Ranger Stove

Thank you, KarlOS. I'll do that soon.

I can't get hold of a 1 litre paint can right now (not without product that I've got no use for) so, for my first attempt, I've bought a $3 coffee storage tin. I'm bound to screw it up, so I didn't buy stainless steel. This coffee can has an 'attractive' thick polka dot paint finish on it and it says 'coffee' on the side.

I have two empty food cans that fit inside this storage can. One is a bit loose (3/8th of an inch air gap all the way round). The other is a lot more snug (1/8th inch air gap all the way round). Which would you go with?

Also, I'm not sure how the paint finish on the storage can will stand up to heat. I'm wondering whether to try to remove the paint before I use my heatproof paint, or just see what happens when I burn some wood chips in it. Or maybe just put the heatproof paint over the top of the factory paint?

Any advice would be appreciated. I'm in the UK so I'm using the closest metric drill bits that I can find to your imperial.

Teifi
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Old 12-10-2013, 03:08 PM
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I can't get hold of a 1 litre paint can right now (not without product that I've got no use for) so, for my first attempt, I've bought a $3 coffee storage tin. I'm bound to screw it up, so I didn't buy stainless steel. This coffee can has an 'attractive' thick polka dot paint finish on it and it says 'coffee' on the side.
Our paint cans aren't stainless steel, they are tin coated steel. Nothing special, really.

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Originally Posted by Teifi View Post
I have two empty food cans that fit inside this storage can. One is a bit loose (3/8th of an inch air gap all the way round). The other is a lot more snug (1/8th inch air gap all the way round). Which would you go with?
Excellent question! Go with the larger gap (3/8") - it helps increase airflow and increases secondary air, which is important.

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Originally Posted by Teifi View Post
Also, I'm not sure how the paint finish on the storage can will stand up to heat. I'm wondering whether to try to remove the paint before I use my heatproof paint, or just see what happens when I burn some wood chips in it. Or maybe just put the heatproof paint over the top of the factory paint?
If it were me (and it's not), I'd scuff the paint real well and put 3 coats of hi-temp paint over it. As long as the paint has something to stick to (the scuffs), I don't see a problem.

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Any advice would be appreciated. I'm in the UK so I'm using the closest metric drill bits that I can find to your imperial.
4mm = 5/32"
11-12mm = 7/16"

Hope that helps.

KarlOS
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Old 12-10-2013, 10:38 PM
Teifi Teifi is offline
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Thank you, KarlOS. I figured your paint cans were the same as ours. What I meant is that coffee storage cans come in stainless steel as well as basic tin/steel. They looked nice, but I couldn't justify the expense. I guess at some point it would be nice to build an all stainless steel stove. What really impressed me about your stove is how clean burning it was. A clear flame and virtually smokeless.

I will go with the wider air gap, as you suggest. I might drill out the larger can too, just to swap out and see the difference. I'll also thoroughly key the surface of the outer can for painting. I've already ordered a large drill bit.

Thanks again for all your help. I tried to post a hello this morning in the introduction forum, but it wouldn't let me. I'll try again now.

Teifi
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Old 12-10-2013, 10:50 PM
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KarlOS, I have now successfully posted my introduction in the Newbie section. Just a little bit about me. I'm up to five posts! (Including this one.) I look forward to getting a look at your schematics. Thanks in advance! Teifi
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Old 12-10-2013, 11:02 PM
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KarlOS, I have now successfully posted my introduction in the Newbie section. Just a little bit about me. I'm up to five posts! (Including this one.) I look forward to getting a look at your schematics. Thanks in advance! Teifi
Excellent! PM me your email addy so I know where to send the plans.

k.
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Old 12-10-2013, 11:30 PM
Teifi Teifi is offline
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I'd like to, KarlOS, but the closest I'm allowed to PMing is to add you to my contacts. I'm not allowed to see your public profile yet. Would you mind sending a PM to me? Cheers, Teifi
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Old 12-11-2013, 12:16 AM
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Very nice job.
Down to earth info that folks can really use.
Thanks for giving it away to everyone.
Maybe it'll help some to get their feet wet with a simple prepping project that will hook them.
Look for my PM request for the plans.
Hope to try this out soon.
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Old 12-11-2013, 10:36 PM
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Here's a big thanks for the plans you sent!
And a bump for this thread because I think it serves a very useful purpose.
These are detailed plans done in a professional manner just like your videos.
Great job! Keep up the good work.
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Old 12-12-2013, 09:48 AM
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First off, I want to send a heartfelt THANK YOU to everyone who has requested plans, built a Mountain Ranger, put it to their own use and sent me comments. The response has been humbling to say the least.

I should have done this much earlier (and I apologize for not doing so), but I want to give you an overview of how the Mountain Ranger came into existence. There are a lot of plans freely available for "paint can stoves". I've built and tried every one of them. None performed to my expectations so I decided to build my own.

I had a simple goal: boil 2 cups of water in a canteen cup (cuz that's what I carry) on a single load of fuel.

I read every single document available about portable wood burning gasification stoves. I learned how they work and why. I designed, built and burned countless stoves. It took 18 months before I figured out the "secret" behind the Mountain Ranger: constant primary air with "adjustable" secondary air. This type of stove must b r e a t h e.... This is why the Mountain Ranger burns "blue" - there is MORE secondary air than primary air.

Once the fuel-air mix was figured out, it was time for real-world use, and it wasn't long in coming. Some friends asked if I'd like to help them with some work on their remote, private, backcountry retreat in the mountains... uh, is YES a good enough answer?

There are no pictures or video of this trip. The owners wish to remain private, and so they shall. Two of us spent the next 30 days working on the retreat during the day and sleeping under the stars at night. One of the owners is an engineer, I showed him my stoves (I took two), and he told me I could burn them anywhere on their property at any time - during a time of fire restrictions.

We did everything we possibly could with the Mountain Rangers; we cooked (burgers, steaks, soups, stews and even pizza!), boiled water for coffee, hot chocolate and washing up, used them for light and discovered the "rock trick" if the need for heat arose (it didn't).

We burned the stoves from 4-7 times per day, and on some days up to 10. The stove you see in my first video is that stove. It has been burned over 400 times and could handle that workload again easily. I didn't know this when we went to the mountains so I brought a second stove just in case. That stove is with the owners of the retreat.

This is how the Mountain Ranger came into existence and how it earned it's name. Not just tested - but proven in a real-world trial-by-fire over a 30 day period at altitudes above 6,500ft. All with found fuel. I know of no other wood burning camp stove that has been put through anything like this. There may be, but I am not aware of it.

It's almost 3 years now (January 2011) since I began my quest to build my own wood burning camp stove. Today I have 6 different wood burners and invented a technology that I call ENUD (Enhanced Natural UpDraft). But that's a story that's just going to have to wait for another day...

Thank you all, without you none of this would be possible.
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Old 12-12-2013, 11:09 AM
Southpaw_soldier Southpaw_soldier is offline
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How do you feel about us sharing the plans? I figure it would fall under advertising, but since it's YOUR intellectual property, I wanted to have clear permission before posting and sharing elsewhere.
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Old 12-13-2013, 06:34 AM
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How do you feel about us sharing the plans? I figure it would fall under advertising, but since it's YOUR intellectual property, I wanted to have clear permission before posting and sharing elsewhere.
You're right. I'll need to modify the current plans to make this happen for you. I'm just not quite sure how to do that. There are legal issues I need to address concerning intellectual property and the patents I'm drawing up for my next generation stoves. The problem is this: If I release the plans that you have under a Creative Commons License, the patents for my other stoves may fail consideration by the Patent and Trademark Office. I can generally hold my own when it comes to law, but intellectual property rights law is so incredibly complicated it's difficult to determine a solid course of action. And I suffer from a bit of "brain-fry" every time I read it.

One thing I can do is to draft the patent documents, have them certified and filed at the county courthouse, keep a copy for myself and release the plans that way. This isn't a patent, but it is proof of intellectual property. This is what I'm considering, but I can't get any clear answers from the local legal community. All I want to know is whether that evidence would hold up in court.

My intent is pretty simple: If you want to make a stove, go ahead. If you want to make stoves for your family and friends, go ahead. If you want to make and sell stoves, fine, but you'll need a license from me to do so.

The reason I put that last bit in is to keep corporations (Cabelas are you paying attention?) from ripping off ideas and making a profit. It happened to a friend of mine. Cabelas knocked off some of his hunting and fishing equipment (he didn't patent them), had them manufactured "elsewhere", charged lower prices and put my childhood friend out of business. Let's just say I don't want that to happen to me.

I hope you can see what I'm trying to do and why I'm doing it this way. If I say "yes", I put my other intellectual property rights at risk, and if I say "no", I look like some schmuck who's a control freak out to make a quick buck.

But, maybe there's another solution I've missed...

This forum is full of very smart people. What would you do?
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Old 12-15-2013, 07:20 AM
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Hey Karlos, I love your stove and this thread! It's funny, what with all the fancy, expensive backpacking stoves out there, you still have to buy fuel. Even a lot of the other wood burning ones like the Emberlit (Which I have) and the Solo don't seem to perform as well as your 3 cans and spraypaint! I am going to build one of these when I get home from deployment, ASAP! I made a cruder version, which wasn't nearly as nice as yours, but I can't wait to make some nice ones for people as presents!
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Old 12-15-2013, 07:26 AM
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Great post. Thanks for sharing this.
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