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Old 10-21-2019, 09:38 PM
Nomad, 2nd Nomad, 2nd is online now
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Default Canning persimmions



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Based on this article:

https://www.motherearthnews.com/home...s-zmaz70sozgoe

I'm assuming there's no practical way to home can either American persimmon juice or pulp.

Anyone disagree?
(I can dry some, but I'm about out of empty drying surfices, and there's lots of persimmon....)
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Old 10-21-2019, 09:42 PM
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My in-laws make vinegar out of their persimmons. I don't care for it, though.

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Old 10-21-2019, 09:55 PM
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Can you freeze the puree?
I know it doesn't keep as long as canning, but may be a short term solution.

Thinking of that, could you dry the puree, almost like a fruit roll up?
I wish we got good persimmons here, they're so good when they're good.
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Old 10-21-2019, 10:03 PM
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Can you freeze the puree?
yes, but like space for drying.... Freezer space is at premium around here.

I know it doesn't keep as long as canning, but may be a short term solution.

Thinking of that, could you dry the puree, almost like a fruit roll up?
I wish we got good persimmons here, they're so good when they're good.
You can, and I will a little don't have room for the hundreds of pounds avalable. If I could can it I could put up another set of shelves.

I'm about to dump a 5 gal bucket of peppers into the tub, wash them and then string them on fishing line to dry.

Pears, apples, other peppers, beans, amaranth, sunflower heads, sorghum grain, nuts... I need a drying shed.
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Old 10-22-2019, 04:15 AM
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We usually either freeze some persimmons or dry them in an electric dryer. But, since our freezer is mostly occupied with other products, and my wife and I are not the biggest lovers of persimmons, I usually just make moonshine from them.
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Old 10-22-2019, 07:07 AM
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I disagree.

Here's what I read in the article:

"Looking at this fragrant orange pulp, the innocent homemaker will immediately think: "Oh, I can just add sugar and a little lemon and cook up a batch of delicious jam for the winter."

Alas, it cannot be. Even the gentlest cooking of persimmon pulp seems to bring back the astringency and makes it inedible."

Maybe I got lucky, not sure, but I have canned up some jelly with them. It turned out good and tasty. It was about the consistency of applesauce (might could have used some more pectin to thicken up a little more) and it spread on toast good. I did add some powdered pectin along with the sugar and lemon juice.

I could not find a recipe in the Ball canning book for persimmon so I used the one for blackberry jelly. The recipe was on page 109 and it is the "Berry" recipe. I did take all the seeds and skin out of it first and then just used the pulp.

The only bad thing about it is that I am all out of it now.
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Old 10-22-2019, 07:27 AM
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I disagree.

Here's what I read in the article:

"Looking at this fragrant orange pulp, the innocent homemaker will immediately think: "Oh, I can just add sugar and a little lemon and cook up a batch of delicious jam for the winter."

Alas, it cannot be. Even the gentlest cooking of persimmon pulp seems to bring back the astringency and makes it inedible."

Maybe I got lucky, not sure, but I have canned up some jelly with them. :
Plenty of recipes for jelly goingback 100+ years.

http://www.persimmonpudding.com/recipes/other.html


Plain juice or pulp is what I was talking about.
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Old 10-22-2019, 08:27 PM
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I love dehydrated slices with a bit of lemon juice wash before putting it in the machine.

It's like candy to me.


But I don't recommend planting them in a closed suburban back yard. No lie, people will hop the fence to get them when the tree is full of fruit. Never seen anything like it, but it happens a lot more often than you might think. Out in the front yard people driving by will strip it bare. Never seen a fruit cause so much urban trespassing like a persimmon tree does. I mean, this is Texas and they still do it. Both myself and a sibling all the way across the city have needed to chop the trees down to stop trespassers. Just crazy. It's like a natural OpSec failure point.

But if I lived rural I'd definitely want one as a great alternate sugar source.
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Old 10-22-2019, 08:28 PM
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My buddy offered to fill my pickup truck bed with fruit from trees on his place.


I have some, but not that many.
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Old 10-22-2019, 09:48 PM
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My buddy offered to fill my pickup truck bed with fruit from trees on his place.


I have some, but not that many.
Once the trees get big enough each one will set a couple hundred fruit. If you have a couple newer trees now then give it some time. In a decade you'll have more fruit than you'll ever want.
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Old 10-22-2019, 10:14 PM
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Once the trees get big enough each one will set a couple hundred fruit. If you have a couple newer trees now then give it some time. In a decade you'll have more fruit than you'll ever want.
Given how many fruit trees I've put in.... That's Pretty much a certainty.
(Yea, I know you meant persimmon specifically)

This coming year it'll be grapes and working on putting in a few trees to broaden the season.
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Old 10-22-2019, 10:36 PM
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Given how many fruit trees I've put in.... That's Pretty much a certainty.
(Yea, I know you meant persimmon specifically)

This coming year it'll be grapes and working on putting in a few trees to broaden the season.
The only downside I see of planting too much fruit is taking up space for trees you decide you want later. And who knows what that might be until it happens? If you end up with too much fruit then you let neighbors and the animals have it. As if having a place that deer like to gather is a bad thing? I suppose if you have too much fruit and also like to have your land looking like a pristine suburban yard that may be a problem when it dumps on the ground, but I don't know rural folk who are like that.
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Old 10-22-2019, 10:51 PM
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The only downside I see of planting too much fruit is taking up space for trees you decide you want later.
haven't even started on 40 acres, been working on this half.
Going to put in a couple acres of black walnuts in a year or three, and a few other nut groves.


And who knows what that might be until it happens? If you end up with too much fruit then you let neighbors and the animals have it. that's the plan. May even get a pig. As if having a place that deer like to gather is a bad thing? I expect to have to shoot some bear. I suppose if you have too much fruit and also like to have your land looking like a pristine suburban yard that may be a problem when it dumps on the ground, but I don't know rural folk who are like that.
there's a reason the 2 acres most of them (80) are concentrated on is off by itself.
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Old 10-23-2019, 04:05 AM
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there's a reason the 2 acres most of them (80) are concentrated on is off by itself.
Ya know, it's hard to quote what you put inside my old quote. Just saying.

How come I don't see pecan on your future list? C'mon, a bayou kid without pecans just ain't right.

Besides, I hear that black walnuts kill everything on the ground around them.


If you expect to shoot bear and then eat it you had better carry a small pack with your knives, tarp, and come-along. Bear meat goes nasty fast if you don't gut it open and get it cooling immediately. Taking a couple hours to drag it back and get to working on it heats that meat up and gamey tasting.

As for pigs, you don't get the ferals like we do down here?

So besides nuts, what other non-fruit food trees are you putting in? Moringa? Olive?
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Old 10-23-2019, 10:30 AM
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Ya know, it's hard to quote what you put inside my old quote. Just saying.
I know, but it's an easier conversation to follow and you responding point by point isn't a high priority.

How come I don't see pecan on your future list? C'mon, a bayou kid without pecans just ain't right.
..... Because I already planted them.
C'mon, a bayou kid without pecans just ain't right.




Besides, I hear that black walnuts kill everything on the ground around them.

I have over 400 acres to play with.....

If you expect to shoot bear and then eat it you had better carry a small pack with your knives, tarp, and come-along. Bear meat goes nasty fast if you don't gut it open and get it cooling immediately. Taking a couple hours to drag it back and get to working on it heats that meat up and gamey tasting.
I know

As for pigs, you don't get the ferals like we do down here?

So besides nuts, what other non-fruit food trees are you putting in? Moringa? Olive?
I don't have pigs here, but i have friends in Arkansas who do, so I get all I want free without the issues.

I'm still in the "fruit and nut tree" phase. Haven't even got my maples in yet. Walnut, pecan, butternut, chestnut, hazilnut, white and live oak, hickory, (I was disappointed that shag bark hickory wasn't native, lots of other hickory, but But they aren't as good.) sure I'm forgetting a couple.
Open to suggestions.

Don't known of an olive that will produce in Zone 6. (I've looked)
Doing sunflowers and nuts for oil.
There's a tree that's a substitute for Bay I've tried, but it died. I'll try again as I use a lot of bay in my cooki mg.
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Old 10-23-2019, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Nomad, 2nd View Post
I don't have pigs here, but i have friends in Arkansas who do, so I get all I want free without the issues.

I'm still in the "fruit and nut tree" phase. Haven't even got my maples in yet. Walnut, pecan, butternut, chestnut, hazilnut, white and live oak, hickory, (I was disappointed that shag bark hickory wasn't native, lots of other hickory, but But they aren't as good.) sure I'm forgetting a couple.
Open to suggestions.

Don't known of an olive that will produce in Zone 6. (I've looked)
Doing sunflowers and nuts for oil.
There's a tree that's a substitute for Bay I've tried, but it died. I'll try again as I use a lot of bay in my cooki mg.
For some reason I thought you lived in the Ozarks - "Carya ovata" aka 'Shagbark hickory' is native to most of the Eastern U.S. I have both a few shagbarks on the hillier farms we own and many "Carya laciniosa" aka 'shellbarks' in the bottom lands. For me, the shellbark nuts taste almost as good. Regarding walnuts I have both butternuts and blacks. I'm in zone 6b and am at the far S. extent for butternuts. I'm planting more of them, even though it's pretty unlikely I'll be around long enough to harvest many of them - butternuts shell out easier and taste better IMO.
https://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/mis...arya/ovata.htm
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Old 10-23-2019, 11:25 AM
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For some reason I thought you lived in the Ozarks - "]
I do.

I'm not saying it's not native.... Just that the hickory there were on my property when I bought it weren't shagbark.
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Old 10-23-2019, 08:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Nomad, 2nd View Post
I don't have pigs here, but i have friends in Arkansas who do, so I get all I want free without the issues.

I'm still in the "fruit and nut tree" phase. Haven't even got my maples in yet. Walnut, pecan, butternut, chestnut, hazilnut, white and live oak, hickory, (I was disappointed that shag bark hickory wasn't native, lots of other hickory, but But they aren't as good.) sure I'm forgetting a couple.
Open to suggestions.

Don't known of an olive that will produce in Zone 6. (I've looked)
Doing sunflowers and nuts for oil.
There's a tree that's a substitute for Bay I've tried, but it died. I'll try again as I use a lot of bay in my cooki mg.
For things like bay laurel or tea bushes, consider mooching a backhoe or bobcat and making a Walpini. Line it with Hesco baskets or easy concrete bag construction. The later being you just stack and soak them still in the bag and then burn the bag off once cured. You have an ideal climate for a split top Walpini because half your year is warm enough to grow zone 8.

Bay does well enough in pots and as bonsai too, so you can have bay even if the area gets too cold outside in the winter. Even "lots of bay" is still a relative term. Even a bay fanatic only needs a hundred leaves a year when you only need one leaf per soup pot. Most Cajun folks I know with a full grown tree in their yard barely put a tiny dent in potential leaf production. A 5 foot potted bush version would handle your needs.

As for tree suggestions be sure to consider medicinal trees.

Slippery elm, hawthorne, elder, willow, witch hazel, basswood, ginkgo, etc. I did not screen those suggestions for zone hardiness but I'm sure many will be fine in zone 6. Lots of suggestion lists online for medicinal trees. Many of them are multi-use trees good for food or wood as well as medicinal.
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