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Old 09-08-2019, 09:42 PM
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Used to grow a years worth of Cushaw pumpkin without much fuss but have had difficulty lately with growing them so I gave up.
I figure when I retire next year I can devote more time to my gardening.
Probably start a drip feed.
I do freeze up alot of green beens.
Always several varieties of tomatoes, and grow zuccinni ect.
Tried Yukon Gold one year but just have a few raised beds. (lawn soil is clay ).
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Old 09-09-2019, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by dealfinder500 View Post
If you wait until around November/December, many grocery stores will have them very cheap - I think I recall seeing 19¢ a lb 2-3 years ago.
That's what we've decided to do for butternut squash. They've been dropped from the grow list and I'll buy what I need when the price drops around Thanksgiving time.
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Old 09-12-2019, 09:42 PM
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I agree that there is no singular "best" crop for a sustainable garden. One crop that is always in mine is amaranth. It is a highly nutritious, low-maintenance, robust, self-seeder that is great for greens, especially in the summer when others have bolted, and for its abundant production of easily processed, versatile seeds. I also plant cowpea (black-eyed pea) for the same reasons; with its edible greens, edible pods, and seeds that are great fresh or dried, it is a crop that really earns its place in a survival garden. Of course I plant other crops because I think it is essential to have diversity against an unpredictable season and for nutritional balance.
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Old 09-13-2019, 01:39 PM
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I agree that there is no singular "best" crop for a sustainable garden. One crop that is always in mine is amaranth. It is a highly nutritious, low-maintenance, robust, self-seeder that is great for greens, especially in the summer when others have bolted, and for its abundant production of easily processed, versatile seeds. I also plant cowpea (black-eyed pea) for the same reasons; with its edible greens, edible pods, and seeds that are great fresh or dried, it is a crop that really earns its place in a survival garden. Of course I plant other crops because I think it is essential to have diversity against an unpredictable season and for nutritional balance.
Do you grow a commercial variety of amaranth or a "captured" wild variety? Do you have to soak the seeds to remove the saponnins? Amaranth is one of the plants I'm interested in growing in my "hidden" garden. It looks like a big weed and only those in the know would understand its value.

As a bonus the wild plant grows in really crappy soil (but requires lots of sunlight). There was a 300 plant colony that popped up on a rocky hillside near a newly constructed road last year but this year it looks like some sort of fennel is out competing the amaranth.
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Old 09-13-2019, 07:08 PM
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Our BOL garden growing season is around 90 to 100 days.
Sometimes a bit shorter or longer.
So, unless started in our greenhouse, we grow mostly quick maturing vegetables.

Some examples in the link below:

https://harvesttotable.com/quick-mat...getable_varie/

After lots of trial & error, Yukon Gold is usually the potatoes we grow.
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Old 09-13-2019, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Prepper_Ed View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Survivor_in_PAW View Post
I agree that there is no singular "best" crop for a sustainable garden. One crop that is always in mine is amaranth. It is a highly nutritious, low-maintenance, robust, self-seeder that is great for greens, especially in the summer when others have bolted, and for its abundant production of easily processed, versatile seeds. I also plant cowpea (black-eyed pea) for the same reasons; with its edible greens, edible pods, and seeds that are great fresh or dried, it is a crop that really earns its place in a survival garden. Of course I plant other crops because I think it is essential to have diversity against an unpredictable season and for nutritional balance.
Do you grow a commercial variety of amaranth or a "captured" wild variety? Do you have to soak the seeds to remove the saponnins? Amaranth is one of the plants I'm interested in growing in my "hidden" garden. It looks like a big weed and only those in the know would understand its value.

As a bonus the wild plant grows in really crappy soil (but requires lots of sunlight). There was a 300 plant colony that popped up on a rocky hillside near a newly constructed road last year but this year it looks like some sort of fennel is out competing the amaranth.
Unlike quinoa seed, amaranth seed doesn't need to be soaked - at least I've never done so in all my time growing and using it. I originally grew varieties from a seed house but now I don't need to buy seed as it self-seeds and is easy to save seed from. I've got two varieties - a red leaved, black seeded one and a yellow seeded, green leaved one. The only real appreciable difference being that in the spring when the self-sown seedlings appear, it is far easier to spot the red-leaved "weed" in places it isn't supposed to be. Prepper Ed is right in that it can thrive in crappy soil and I've had success with it in less than full sun. It would make a great guerrilla crop but it does get tall and showy so it will draw attention to itself, though it could blend in through thoughtful placement.
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Old 09-13-2019, 09:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Survivor_in_PAW View Post
Unlike quinoa seed, amaranth seed doesn't need to be soaked - at least I've never done so in all my time growing and using it. I originally grew varieties from a seed house but now I don't need to buy seed as it self-seeds and is easy to save seed from. I've got two varieties - a red leaved, black seeded one and a yellow seeded, green leaved one. The only real appreciable difference being that in the spring when the self-sown seedlings appear, it is far easier to spot the red-leaved "weed" in places it isn't supposed to be. Prepper Ed is right in that it can thrive in crappy soil and I've had success with it in less than full sun. It would make a great guerrilla crop but it does get tall and showy so it will draw attention to itself, though it could blend in through thoughtful placement.
i just read that it does well in FL.
Here is a link: http://www.eattheweeds.com/amaranth-...egetable-icon/
apparently there are between 60-70 species and it certainly seems to be an easy and worth while plant to grow. Both the seeds and leaves are edible. The spanish forbade it cultivation in Mexico since it was involved in Aztec sacrificial rituals. Something about it being mixed with blood to make objects and then it was consumed.
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Old 09-13-2019, 09:38 PM
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Originally Posted by goat daddy View Post
Black eyed peas. Great crop, every time I plant them.
I am considering trying Black-eyed Peas next year, and also Chick Peas. I believe both might do well where I live.
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Old 09-13-2019, 11:28 PM
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I am considering trying Black-eyed Peas next year, and also Chick Peas. I believe both might do well where I live.
I grow both and while I love the look of the chickpea plant itself and having diversity in the garden, I find chickpeas aren't nearly as productive as a black-eyed pea. A chickpea plant can be loaded with pods but at most there are two seeds per pod, whereas with black-eyed peas, depending on variety there can be upwards of 20+ seeds per pod. And you can harvest leaves for greens as well. Just something to consider if you are wanting to maximize yield.
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Old 09-13-2019, 11:59 PM
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I grow both and while I love the look of the chickpea plant itself and having diversity in the garden, I find chickpeas aren't nearly as productive as a black-eyed pea.
Thanks for the advice, I appreciate it.

I'll try both as an experiment, in order to see how they do. It took me a few years of experimentation to find what varieties of flint corn do best where I'm located.
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Old 09-15-2019, 07:09 AM
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Tomatoes #1
Okra
Bell Peppers
Green Beans
Swiss Chard
Jalapeños
Various Herbs

🍅 🍅
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Old 09-15-2019, 09:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Survivor_in_PAW View Post
Unlike quinoa seed, amaranth seed doesn't need to be soaked - at least I've never done so in all my time growing and using it. I originally grew varieties from a seed house but now I don't need to buy seed as it self-seeds and is easy to save seed from. I've got two varieties - a red leaved, black seeded one and a yellow seeded, green leaved one. The only real appreciable difference being that in the spring when the self-sown seedlings appear, it is far easier to spot the red-leaved "weed" in places it isn't supposed to be. Prepper Ed is right in that it can thrive in crappy soil and I've had success with it in less than full sun. It would make a great guerrilla crop but it does get tall and showy so it will draw attention to itself, though it could blend in through thoughtful placement.
Thanks for the info. The only type I've seen in NW AR is the green leafed variety. I'm really hankering to harvest some of the plants by the side of the road but it's on a well-traveled road in a town with busy body police. If they see someone picking weeds by the side of the road I'm sure they'll think it's something illicit.
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Old 09-15-2019, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Prepper_Ed View Post
Thanks for the info. The only type I've seen in NW AR is the green leafed variety. I'm really hankering to harvest some of the plants by the side of the road but it's on a well-traveled road in a town with busy body police. If they see someone picking weeds by the side of the road I'm sure they'll think it's something illicit.
I am hesitant to eat anything like berries, greens, etc from road side locals because of past and current pollution from spraying, runoff from adjacent lands, and also pollution from roadway vehicles.
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Old 09-15-2019, 02:05 PM
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Last night I picked okra, tomatoes and black eyes. I shelled about two pounds of black eyes and qt bag of green peas. I was looking at the amount of peas left but the wild turkeys are in for the fall season so they may not last. The turkeys will be here until mid November.
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Old 09-15-2019, 08:11 PM
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I am hesitant to eat anything like berries, greens, etc from road side locals because of past and current pollution from spraying, runoff from adjacent lands, and also pollution from roadway vehicles.
Wash it first. The fruits and veggies you buy at the grocery store have probably been sprayed with herbicides and pesticides and they were probably picked by workers with dirty hands.

There hasn't been any herbicide sprayed since the colony has been growing unmolested for about two years. It's beside a new roadway so lead contamination from the old leaded gasoline shouldn't be an issue.
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Old 09-16-2019, 03:27 PM
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Potatoes are high yielding per acre and high calories per pound, but very susceptible to disease to the point of requiring the rotation of the planted location. Sweet potatoes are grown from "slips", not seeds, which is a major negative in my book. Corn is great, but sucks nitrogen heavily from the soil which makes either manure or legume rotation necessary. Winter squash is low in calorie density, but is easiest to harvest, stores well, and can be planted onto ground that is not even plowed. Rutabaga, while less known and with a lower calorie density than potatoes, stores well, is easy to harvest, has fewer parasite problems, and doesn't taste bad at all with butter. Carrots are cold hardy, have lots of vitamin A and sugar, but not much else. Kale is cold hardy (I have a variety that survives harsh winters) and is loaded with vitamins. Sunflower seeds are low yielding per acre, but high in protein and fat. Flax seed is the omega-3 plant source needed to offset the omega-6 from sunflower seeds and nuts. Nuts are God's perennial gift to survivalists. They are high in protein and monounsaturated fats. Buckwheat is what you grow when you have adequate land, but are looking at starvation with only a couple of months left to grow something to keep you alive for the winter.
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Old 09-17-2019, 06:28 PM
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I was reminded today of another "always" crop in my garden - ground cherries (aka husk cherries, aka cape gooseberries.) I plant 'em and forget 'em and come late summer I am collecting them by the bucket full. They are sweet, vitamin-rich, and versatile. Left in their husks they last months in a cool, dry location. The plants tolerate poor conditions and did I mention they are extremely productive?! Another bonus for me is that invariably I miss a couple of the fruits and they self-seed. Would be another guerrilla crop candidate with patches tucked around the property; the fact the fruits are protected in husks means I don't have to hover harvest.
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Old 10-01-2019, 08:36 PM
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I should have taken more time to elaborate in the video. I would never that imply someone focus only on potatoes. They are however the backbone of our garden. To those discussing disease and rotation, we have planted that same plot for 4 years with zero disease. Next year will be rotated for nutritional reasons. Sweet potatoes and beans are a close second for us. Downsides being, slips are needed for sweet potatoes which could be a issue without power. Dry beans have very little more nutrition than potatoes. Ultimately, just get out and experiment. GROW!
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