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Old 09-26-2019, 07:26 PM
Vanishing Nomad Vanishing Nomad is offline
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Originally Posted by ROCK6 View Post
But you're still thinking with a constrained viewpoint

SOPs are simply ways to update following "lessons-learned" or "how things are done" for new members of a team. Not every thing needs an SOP, but for those functions, tasks, operations, etc. that don't get used often or may be used by someone without the experience, they still have value.

ROCK6
I actually have an SOP for everything from the way I set up my camp, to how I make fire, even to how I pack my pack. NONE of it is written down though. It's all in my head from doing it a certain way, for so long.
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Old 09-26-2019, 07:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Vanishing Nomad View Post
I actually have an SOP for everything from the way I set up my camp, to how I make fire, even to how I pack my pack. NONE of it is written down though. It's all in my head from doing it a certain way, for so long.
Yeah, most of that stuff is built off a packing list for me. However, I've had a video camera that I made a "cheat-sheet" SOP for as it was new and I didn't want to pack the instruction book If you do enough of it, it does become second nature. I built some SOPs for an outdoors group of kids form our church (laminated instruction cards). Basic stuff, but they were pretty inexperienced:

Camp priorities.
Signaling methods.
Basic compass use, topo map features cheat sheet.
Water filtration / purification (mainly focused on avoiding cross contamination).
General distances of camp or poop spots from water sources.

Most of us know that basic knowledge off the top of our head. Aside from camping and backpacking, SOPs can be helpful when you get into group activities as many will likely not have the memory, experience, or knowledge of some aspects of "operational" activities.

ROCK6
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Old 09-27-2019, 07:56 AM
Major Mjolnir Major Mjolnir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ROCK6 View Post
...Another update I want to make are some basic knots. I have used a handful of knots in the past with my tarp and hammock setups, but have switched to easier/faster tension devices. I want to add the knots back in as an alternative or backup. For me, knots are something I have to practice often or I struggle at remembering...or at least it takes me longer to get them right (and that sucks when it's cold, windy, and raining). At least with an SOP, I can add that back into my preparation and practice a few before and during the trip so if I do need to use a particular knot, it's something I've programed into my preparation and have built into my daily routine.

Good topic and some good thoughts and SOP actions...

ROCK6
My usual routine early in the morning as I sip coffee, peruse this site and listen to Hugh Hewitt is to practice my knot tying. It's usually dimly lit and I try to both tie and untie the knots without looking at them. I think most people under estimate how difficult it can be to do this in the darkness.
I do these three as well as several variations of them both left and right handed. I'm what I call a discrete motion lefty. I eat, shoot, throw a punch and hammer nails from the left side while I swing an ax, bat or golf club from the right. I started tying knots right handed when I realized how hard it was to teach the majority 'righty' kids in our group a few knots.
My 'go-tos' below left to right are ABOK #1053 the Lineman's Rider - later known as a Butterfly, ABOK #1054 the Farmer's Loop and ABOK #1010 the Common Bowline.
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Old 09-27-2019, 04:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ROCK6 View Post
But you're still thinking with a constrained viewpoint

SOPs are simply ways to update following "lessons-learned" or "how things are done" for new members of a team. Not every thing needs an SOP, but for those functions, tasks, operations, etc. that don't get used often or may be used by someone without the experience, they still have value.

ROCK6
I've written a fair share. For their application they're great. For my purposes they were a "lowest common demonitor" level checklist for when I couldn't be there and often got to the Barney level when writing them as a result.

My group is small and competent. Anything we have set up would look closer to a battle drill you'd seen in the BN TOC than and SOP...

..but that's probably splitting hairs.
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Old 09-28-2019, 08:42 PM
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I've written a fair share. For their application they're great. For my purposes they were a "lowest common demonitor" level checklist for when I couldn't be there and often got to the Barney level when writing them as a result.

My group is small and competent. Anything we have set up would look closer to a battle drill you'd seen in the BN TOC than and SOP...

..but that's probably splitting hairs.
On the flip side, I've seen SOPs as big as the Bible...so big that nobody ever referenced it. I've always felt SOPs need to be focused on the more complex tasks, succinct, simply the essential steps or processes, and when you perform any drills or exercises, validate the SOP. I've eliminated a lot of stupid, redundant, pointless stuff in our unit SOPs when I found they were never used, outdated, or stupid.

I was on an exercise and review one of those Field-SOP novels when I came across the TOC procedures. There were three whole pages dedicated to the process of brewing up coffee That our Brigade S3 approved it and the BDE COM signed it shows that no one really even reads those massive procedural guides. I still chuckle at that: Where/how the coffee and silver bullet were stored, where to plug it in (the UPS so you still have hot coffee if you lose power), coffee filter installation (and removal), coffee measuring, having the emergency "spill kit" supplies on hand, maintenance and recovery (cleaning) procedures, troubleshooting procedures...three whole pages...ridiculously funny and a good example of a SOP-gone-wild

For those that want to know what an SOP looks like get a copy of a Ranger Handbook. Consider if you're in the leadership and there's a complex task, if you're incapacitated, or the top three leaders are absent, can the "next man up" still execute the mission or task? When people ask about military SOPs, I've seen the comical ones like brewing coffee, and I've seen the technical ones geared towards engineers. My favorite example is the basic SOP in the Ranger Handbook of establishing an ORP or patrol-base. It has purpose, methods, examples, priorities of work, distribution of work, security, entry/exit, etc. etc. etc.

Some of us have dealt with hundreds of SOPs over our careers. I've seen only a handful of SOPs that were actually easy to read, simple, short, and helpful as someone new to the team/unit. Think of a basic checklist of getting your home ready for a hurricane, blizzard/extremely low temps, etc. If you're away from home, could your wife, kids, family friend, neighbor, etc. grab a small notebook that explains all the preparations that need to be done, where equipment is stored, cut-off/shut-off valves, what's need to buy a the store if not already on hand, etc.?

The simple SOPs (with pictures) are helpful for young kids if you're not around. Backup generator procedures are another one as it's very much home-specific. Radio/base-station setup, link up procedures, communications PACE plan, etc. are all helpful if you've got several members in a family or group. SOPs are a good practice if you don't practice the procedures often, anticipate inexperienced/new members, a how-to-guide for critical functions if the leadership is incapacitated. Don't overthink them or make them complicated...but don't spend three pages on how to brew a cup of coffee post-SHTF

ROCK6
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Old 09-29-2019, 08:05 PM
Vanishing Nomad Vanishing Nomad is offline
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SOP for SHTF

Step 1 - Brew Coffee.
Step 2 - Slowly Drink Coffee
Step 3 -?
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Old 09-30-2019, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Vanishing Nomad View Post
SOP for SHTF

Step 1 - Brew Coffee.
Step 2 - Slowly Drink Coffee
Step 3 -?
Step 3 - Keep the refill ready and hot...come on VN, you can do this
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Old 10-01-2019, 05:05 PM
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Related to food - avoid any mixes (pancakes, etc.) that require anything but water. Nothing worse than pulling out a packet of something that needs eggs, milk, and butter.
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Old Yesterday, 10:00 PM
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Always be prepared for wildlife!

Typical noise so you don’t come upon and startle anything!

Are you carrying anything that might attract a predator?

I always make sure whatever I have for defense is really ready to go. Whether it’s a gun, knife, or mace.

Know the different animals you might encounter and be prepared!

Know what the big game animals in your area are doing at the time of the year where you are! Are bears foraging for hibernation? What are the chances of running into a mother bear with cubs? Can you outrun your partner if a cougar attacks??
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