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Old 12-25-2013, 09:47 PM
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Originally Posted by levelfarmer View Post
I have installed several miles of fence in the last three years. I use regular 42" field fence, with a single strand of barbed wire, making the barrier 48" to 50". I have goats and donkeys enclosed now, but hope to add cows when I can find a bargain on a small herd. I use the mesh gates like you pictured in the OP. Works well for goats.
Wonderful post, and thank you.

Is this the fence you use?

http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...-fence-42-in-h
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Old 12-26-2013, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by kev View Post
Wonderful post, and thank you.

Is this the fence you use?

http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...-fence-42-in-h
That's it.
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Old 12-26-2013, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by TexasR.N. View Post
Looks good, don't forget a fence stretcher:
http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...ence-stretcher

I made a homemade version because I needed it at the time, and was sick of driving to town that day.

Don't know if you are familiar with putting up field fence, but I have found this to be one of the best ways to put the fence up:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDu4WO_gbgY
Sorry about the quality but it was one of the shorter clips I could find.

I made a similar stretcher except I used a single eye bolt in the middle of the the 2x4 and then used a come-a-long anchored to a fence post to pull it up. Just roll the fence out, attach the far end it an anchored post first, come back and ratchet up the other end. The fence will just stand up and you can set your T-post where you want them distance wise.
I still use the fence stretcher my grandfather made.

I have rotating pastures and use solar two tape electric fences for them. Every couple weeks, depending on how much rain we get, I move the fence and move the livestock in it. This way I don't have to feed precious hay in the summer time. I was told it doesn't work well for goats though. Since I don't have goats this I wouldn't know.
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Old 12-26-2013, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kev1n69 View Post
were known far and wide as 20 year fence material.
requiring no treatment as they grow in a swamp.
at least when we fenced the farm 32 years ago we never treated our cedar and aprox 50 % of the 32year old posts are still original.
Two misconceptions about cedar:

Rot Proof... not true. Maybe resistant, but they will rot quite a bit below ground. That is why I tar mine and wrap in a trash bag to keep water out (I have a water table that is close to the surface).

Bug Proof... not true. They repel many bugs, that is true, but there are beetles that still burrow holes all through them.

PS. cedars are not swamp trees. You're thinking of Cypress. The only cedar I've ever seen around a swamp is white cedar and I've got red cedar on my property. Not sure how water resistant white cedar is because I don't mess with it myself.
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Old 12-26-2013, 11:03 AM
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That's it.
Thank you very much.
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Old 12-27-2013, 09:44 AM
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Kev I see your posting a few items from tractor supply. They have a nice website. I have shopped recently in our area and purchased my fence supplies from McCoy's in orange. https://www.mccoys.com I purchased Stay tuff brand fence. The fence has been delivered and it looks as good as the videos stay tuff has posted of them attempting to drive a truck through it!
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Old 12-28-2013, 10:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kev View Post
Wonderful post, and thank you.

Is this the fence you use?

http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...-fence-42-in-h
Right out of HS I worked 3 years for a cattle and sheep rancher in CO. We built his fence the same way as this but used two strands of barb wire on top. Cedar post as corners and line braces every 15-20 steel post. 6.5 steel post driven in the ground 2 ft. puts your top starnd right below the white top. Make sure and cut the verticle strands out of the mesh and wrap each one around your corner post then twisted around your wire for a strong hold. Don't just do the top, middle and bottom, do every strand.

Set your corners and stretch a strand of your barb on the ground as your line. Then once the steel post are set, remove the barb and use it for one of your strands above your mesh.

We even went so far as to use our riflescope to line up the tops of the steel post. Nothing like a staight built fence.

This was back in 1980-83 and when I went to visit my dad last year, the fence was still up and looked to be in good shape.

Like mentioned, a good pair of fencing pliers and a good fence stretcher are key. We had a winch on the front of the truck we used when we could get the truck where we were building fence.
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Old 12-28-2013, 01:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Holey22 View Post
...Nothing like a straight built fence.....
In my opinion that's the hardest part about building fence.

If its not really straight it just looks amateurish.
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Old 12-30-2013, 04:39 PM
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Default Wire Mesh

If you are going to go with wire mesh - usually the best size to use is a 2" x 2" center to center .063" wire diameter. Use Galvanized, because this will rust less and will be cheaper price wise.

I know these guys sell it - http://www.bwire.com/index.html in rolls of 150' x 60" in width, which is a good size and they give a pretty good price discount if you buy upwards of 20 rolls.

I am sure a local farming warehouse may have this stuff as well.
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Old 12-30-2013, 04:44 PM
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Horses and barbed wire do not mix. A cow has much tougher hide and if caught in the wire will usually stand until you come and cut them out. A horse will kill itself trying to escape.
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Old 09-17-2019, 10:36 AM
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interesting
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Old 09-22-2019, 04:08 AM
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Around out cow/goat pen, we have a combination of corral panels with cattle panels wired to them on one side {the horses were in an adjacent corral), with cattle panels around the remaining sides, except for a small section of no-climb horse fence, and a chain-link gate. The corral panels are strong enough to withstand the cattle, but MUST have some sort of wire attached to them to keep young goats from escaping...they could give Houdini lessons in escape. Fortunately, my cattle are small (Dexters), but if they wanted to, they probably could demolish the cattle panels. Fortunately, they learned early to respect fences. You'll need LOTS of T-posts to reinforce them, not just on the ends where they connect. Get the really heavy ones, as well.

The young goats, however, frequently stick their heads through the openings of the cattle panels and get stuck. I've gotten REALLY good at extracting them from the fence, WITHOUT cutting it. You just have to grab them by the horns and manipulate their heads to get them out, with the goat NOT cooperating. And the "no-climb" horse fence? The goats CAN, and WILL climb it, and pull it down, unless it is wired to the cattle panels or corral panels. My choice would be the cattle panels (and lots of T-posts) with the no-climb horse fence wired to it.
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