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Old 10-15-2017, 01:05 PM
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Dragunov Dragunov is offline
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Originally Posted by богдан View Post
locust is a amazing bow wood. while I love figured bows for a beginner I probably would recommend he start with as straight a grain as possible to master the basics of bow building.
I agree!. That's why I asked if he wanted a primitive bow. Lots more leeway in making them. I've made crooked Osage bows, and Serviceberry bows on the fly, for fishing. Better finished bows were for hunting. I'd cut several staves, and used the ones that had the best, natural, "Till" to make bows with (They require the least amount of work). The rest were used to make spring traps, snares, and various other survival items that benefit from springy wood.

I know Locust makes superior tool handles, as I've used it for that purpose, but it can be crazy difficult to work with sometimes. I see NO reason it wouldn't work for bows for sure. Just never used it for that purpose.

I had a few Serviceberry bows that lasted for years. Unfortunately, I no longer have them. I'm thinking of making one out of Texas Persimmon, sometime this year.
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Old 10-15-2017, 01:15 PM
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I am, and have been for as long as I can remember, a huge supporter of the logic of this thread. The old ways will serve you well IF you know them. Many modern conveniences are just that--conveniences. While not to be ignored, relying on them without the knowledge of how to do without them is a self-limiting approach. The more you know, the more options you will have at your disposal with less tools in the bag so-to-speak.
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Old 10-15-2017, 01:16 PM
богдан богдан is offline
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Originally Posted by Dragunov View Post
I agree!. That's why I asked if he wanted a primitive bow. Lots more leeway in making them. I've made crooked Osage bows, and Serviceberry bows on the fly, for fishing. Better finished bows were for hunting. I'd cut several staves, and used the ones that were closest in"Till" to make bows with. The rest were used to make spring traps, snares, and various other survival items that benefit from springy wood.

I know Locust makes superior tool handles, as I've used it for that purpose, but it can be crazy difficult to work with sometimes. I see NO reason it wouldn't work for bows for sure. Just never used it for that purpose.

I had a few Serviceberry bows that lasted for years. Unfortunately, I no longer have them. I'm thinking of making one out of Texas Persimmon, sometime this year.
the nicest thing about locust wood for beginers is if you do not tiller correctly it will show on the wood long before it breaks. so you can adjust your tiller.


you should get a stave and make a spring pole lathe with it. but ifyou like woodworking it can be a fun hobby and you get a lathe at the end of it.
also very 1700s since its kinda on target with OPs line of conversations.

example:
the spring pole lathe was used as early as Viking times and its use continued until the early 1900s in a lot of places.
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Old 03-31-2019, 01:01 PM
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there's nothing practical about muzzle loaders. Almost nobody lives where there's sulphur and corning the stuff, so that it burns properly, is very dangerous. It's nasty, corrosive, water aborbing crud. keith is probably into it cause he lives somplace where they can't have real guns.
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