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Old 12-12-2013, 09:37 PM
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Gator Tooth Gator Tooth is offline
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Me to I love my bed. But I love the out doors. Just spoiled here! lol :-)
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Old 04-27-2014, 01:55 AM
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Default Food and survival

se texas is grinnel a good source of food?
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Old 09-30-2014, 09:08 PM
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Default Learn the difference yourselves

Camping, hiking ,survival ,prepper bug out, all different gear and skill sets. Learn how to recognize,improvise, prioritize and realize with the survival simulator. Www.survivalsimulator.com
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Old 11-03-2014, 08:21 AM
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Default Winter is here

Winter has arrived in Norway, got me thinking. I am not sure how big this problem is around the world, my guess is that is pretty big problem. I am thinking about hypothermia. It is scary how little people out there do not know about this dangerous condition. So I want people to know a little more, maybe it will help someone out! Will post a link for people to read a little bit about it, might be obvious for some, but anyway Hypothermia Signs and Treatment
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Old 12-14-2014, 12:32 PM
Idaho Survivalist Idaho Survivalist is offline
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Wink hiking, camping, survival

I have been reading through a lot of these posts and it seems to me that either most folks haven't hiked much in deep forests or have some weird idea that if things got bad, they would either take their families or go alone to live in the woods.

Twenty years ago, my area was inundated with a lot of people who figured that black helicopters and the Chinese would soon be after us. I was sitting one afternoon with a couple of guys when one, a former Marine who had fought in Vietnam, said that he would take his family out in the wilderness and live. I asked him how much he had hiked in the area and he replied in the negative. He assumed that a combat Marine could make it anywhere. I never talked him out of such a foolish idea, but luckily he never had to try something like that.

Here in the foothills of the northern Rockies, conditions change rapidly in a short amount of time. I summer and fall day hike a lot and have realized that I would not be able to survive even alone, let alone take along my wife, on an extended camping-survival session.. In the spring, I'd have to worry about wet snow and rain which could cause hypothermia, lots of ticks which could give Lyme disease among other things. In winter snow would cover existing trails, even many game trails.

I read about those who would take an assault rifle. One big problem is how would I sling my AR over my pack? I have a good Viking Tactical sling that can place it on my back for easy access and carry, but not over my pack. Also, it is real easy to snag AR parts on limbs and brush. I tried hiking a few times in only moderate brush with my AR and it was not good. Also, although you could kill a deer with a .223, I wouldn't want to go up against a bear, a charging moose, or even a wolf, with any .22 caliber. When I hike now, I take a can of Alaska bear spray, a .357 revolver, and a small 9 for backup and humans. If I were to spend much time, say hiking and camping in the wilderness, I would take my .30-.30 Winchester, also. Hiking in present good conditions I also take my HAM radio, but even that, although much more dependable than a cell phone in canyons, id still pretty much line of sight.

In most seasons of the year you could break a leg, sprain an ankle, or fall on a pointed stick. You could try to cross a rushing stream, and in high country they rush, and fall in the water, getting person and gear soaking wet.

I'm pretty sure that a lot of people think they can live off the land back in the mountains. In my 20+ years of hiking in my area of Northern Idaho, I have only seen one moose, a cow and calf, a few elk, very few deer, no bear, and one wolf. Near civilization, I have seen thousands of deer, hundreds of elk, two bears, one moose (standing in a river inside city limits of a small town), and one black wolf near a pond of mine. I see many quail and grouse. I see ducks and a rabbit or two. But never do I see those animals and birds in the wilderness.

If times get that bad I, along with most like-minded people in my area will fight it out near home. Then I can use my AR and combat shotgun as well as tactical handguns for backup.

Maybe there are hard core young survivalists out there who can survive in the woods. I remember, a few years ago, reading about two "mountain men" who had raped and killed a hiker on a western Montana road. They escaped into the mountains and survived for many months, until they ran out of food. These guys were very experienced at living in rough country. But still, they had to come down from the mountains for food and then the sheriff, who knew they could not survive forever, captured them.

And the Nez Perce Indians, very experienced in living and surviving in the mountains, were perseud by General Howard and were eventually taken in Montana.

Just some ideas from a 70-year old.
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Old 12-17-2014, 11:40 AM
TXyakr TXyakr is offline
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Default a few could survive in wildereness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Idaho Survivalist View Post
I have been reading through a lot of these posts and it seems to me that either most folks haven't hiked much in deep forests or have some weird idea that if things got bad, they would either take their families or go alone to live in the woods.
Idaho Survivalist. That was the best comment in this entire rambling thread, I strongly agree with almost everything you said. Only a very small number of people, possibly less than 1 in 100,000 could live for months or years in a true wilderness area without contact or supplies from civilization. Just because I join an experienced friend on a weeklong float trip down the Mid-Salmon River in the Frank Church Wilderness and do some extensive side hikes, it does not mean that I am an expert on that huge wilderness area (one of the largest and most remote in N.A.). A lifetime of guiding people in this wilderness would not make a person knowledgeable about all other regions in NA or the world.

I strongly agree that most wilderness areas have far less wildlife than areas closer to cities. One of the reasons for this is that cities/towns etc. have for thousands of years been built in futile plains and floodlands were there is an abundance of food, while higher elevations, deserts and very cold regions were “leftover” and finally turned into protected wilderness areas. Very limited hunting and gathering is even permitted in these public lands around the world today. This makes surviving there even more difficult. Side note is that in similar riparian areas the density of the raccoon population is higher in large cities downtowns than in very remote places with plenty of wild food. The reason is that humans provide them with lots of food (garbage) and shelter (sewers).

Without going into my family’s history I have lived in very remote areas (no electricity, plumbing, health care clinic etc within 2 hours small plane ride) or weeks by foot and canoe. My father built several airstrips in very remote areas (not his primary job, he just did it because it needed to be done and he had the skills).

So bottom line there is a tiny niche of people who have or need to have the skills to pack a “bug out bag” (or whatever you prefer to call it) and hike for days through the wilderness to get to “civilization” or to where they are going to build a cabin/shack/hut and possibly an airstrip or road or just to do some research there or whatever (practice survival, hunt/fish/garden, prepare for SHTF). Question is, would any of these people post on this particular forum considering how “heavy handed” Kev occasionally appears to be? Most of those I know and trained with would not.

Last edited by TXyakr; 12-17-2014 at 11:41 AM.. Reason: typos
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Old 12-19-2014, 11:30 AM
Idaho Survivalist Idaho Survivalist is offline
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Smile hiking and survival

I liked that last post. If you were on the Salmon, you were probably in my county. Remote and roadless country on the upper Salmon!

I hiked a bit since I last posted and have determined that carrying a .30-.30 might be a little too much, so I'll just stick to the bear spray, the .357 and the Shield. I checked with the manufacturers and they do not recommend Buffalo Bore, so I will go for the best standard commercial rounds.

I hike some most every day, sometimes with no pack and sometimes with a day pack. By spring I hope to be hiking with my old North Face backpack and will add more weight each week until I am hiking with what
plan on taking when I take my goal hike this next summer. Snow on the roads will prevent me from going there until late July.

My goal before I get too old to backpack is to hike the 27-mile loop trail in the Seven Devils part of the Hell's Canyon National Recreation area. I am currently on a sort of weigh reduction-change eating habits program and hope to drop 40 more pounds, and the hike is one of the things that keeps me on track.

I have day hiked somethere on short 7-mile jaunts, several years ago. but this will be a lot harder. I will buy the book for hiking in that area. I haven't found anyone near my age who will accompany me, and all the young bucks have day jobs so I will just go with my dog on a leash. He has a bell and that should help scare away bad animals. And he has a great ear and can alert me to things at night.

And as for going down the Salmon, that is some mighty scary water. Some ten years ago I went down from a mile or so above Riggins down to Lucille in a rubber boat and it was scary going through Time Zone Rapids.

I hope times never get bad enough such that I would need to leave my home, but if they do I want to remain within a mile of home. If I have to go farther, hiking in the wilderness may help, as long as my survival leaving is in late spring to early fall. And even then I would only last until my food ran out, or I sprained an ankle, or had any number of nasty things happen to me which easily happen while out in the deep woods.
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Old 12-27-2014, 03:47 PM
TXyakr TXyakr is offline
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That sounds like fun adventure hiking in Idaho. I have often wondered how much a dog keeps the wild predators away versus draws them in. In East Texas where few large predators remain some friends and I were camping along the Sabine river in a relatively remote area one night when a pair of puma (mountain lions) screamed back and forth at each other about 30 and 100 yards from where our tents and tarps were. One of us had a labrador dog so it was a question of whether the dog had made them territorial or curious or just the people, or if the puma were just passing through regardless. No beast or human was harmed, it was about 1:30 am and much less of a nuisance than a passing train at a some state parks I have stayed at. Good fun.
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Old 12-28-2014, 06:32 PM
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Default i think it can be mixed

Our bug out location for now is to plqce oj federal land until we get the right piece of property to purchase. As for it being possible...i must disagree there also.
all of my family for as long i can remember have been outdoors type. I was camping before i could walk and my children have been raised the saame way. We do take guns every time we go along with other survival tools. We are much more reliant on bows and knives...guns will be used for a last stand. Bow and arrow can be recycled and very quiet for offencive measures if threatened. We try and practice living off the land as often as we can.
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Old 12-28-2014, 07:31 PM
Idaho Survivalist Idaho Survivalist is offline
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Cool

Dogs could be bad around wolves, but then it might be nice to be warned of things coming around my camp at night. Haven't decided yet.

As to camping and surviving in the woods, I, also do lots of camping and have been a scout leader. I have been on winter camp-outs and it sure doesn't take much to get wet. Almost every day for the past month I have been hiking around my place. For the past week I have been hiking with a backpack weighing 25 pounds. Last night we got 5 inches of wet snow, and going up and down hills 150 feet in elevation is a bit tiring (good exercise and am I preparing for mountain hiking next summer. I hope to go out every day for about a half mile each morning. Tonight it is supposed to get down to 18 and tomorrow night to 3 degrees. Such cold is better hiking than 30 degrees and snow.

On one scout cam-pout I was on once, a 12-year old slipped on snow while crossing a rushing stream on a log, even though there was a wire within grabbing distance. He fell in with pack and all and our troop had to quickly undress him. Had most youngsters and also most adults been alone in such a situation, hypothermia probably would have killed them.

As I get stronger, I will begin hiking on a nearby loop trail on a lumber company plot of land. Those 1300 acres also have a good series of ups and downs. And in winter snows, I have seen many wolf tracks and black bear sign. I am armed but I continually look behind me and to both sides while I walk up and down tree-laden roads. Even with a rifle, I use caution.

But if I had to go into such areas in a SHTF scenario, I would need to take my wife who does not shoot, and although she walks the 1/2 mile to and from our mailbox most days, she doesn't carry her pack. Hot flashes will curb that idea so I would have to carry most survival supplies. I just hope that if I ever have to escape, it will be during summer or early fall, otherwise I plan on staying home and fighting it out.
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Old 03-08-2015, 03:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shredking View Post
i thought this was a camping and hiking thread... but now i feel like picking a fight with someone....
who wants some? :P
j/k actually i need some advice about taking my gf camping.... im used to bringing the bare minimum(i eat what i kill, i wipe with mother nature, ect, ect)... aside from poop paper, food and a tent... does anyone have any advice about what to bring with for chick on a 3 night-4 day camping trip??
I got my wife to go camping with me by getting a butane curling iron
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Old 03-30-2015, 08:52 AM
JJohnsonMtMan JJohnsonMtMan is offline
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Where can I go post and read other members pots on their gear set up? I don't want t flood a forum with unwanted post.
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Old 05-03-2015, 03:22 AM
augoldminer augoldminer is offline
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When i go hiking i have two game cameras that i hide covering my truck.

This is just in case anyone wants to break into my truck while i am gone.

Police just love photos of criminals caught in the act.

In some cases if you are hiking in a remote area someone breaking into your vehicle and taking it or disabling it can be life threatening.

In these cases the criminals can face attempted murder charges.
There is case law under the old horse theft laws that stealing someones transportation and leaving hem in danger of dieing can be charged as attempted murder.
The state of Nevada has convicted at least 2 criminals under this charge
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Old 07-01-2015, 03:33 PM
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Can you in the USA hiking anywhere in the forest and make a campfire? For example, I hiking somewhere in the woods and then I make a campfire and set up tent. It's that OK? Need the landowner's permission?
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Old 07-06-2015, 12:20 PM
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I just wanted to point out that I thought it was stupid to warn people not to post in the wrong forum, and warn about how threads in the wrong forum will be moved, without a word about which forum is the right one, and where the threads will be moved to. The forum index is not at all instructive in this regard.
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Old 08-11-2015, 11:32 PM
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I laughed at the argument on the first page. Haha!

Personally I was starting to wonder if I had a right to post here in this section what with all the BOB conversations and all. turns out I'm the only one with the right to post here haha!!

....just kidding
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Old 08-15-2015, 11:57 PM
parajarcollective parajarcollective is offline
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What's a good way to wear off bugs without over spraying bug spray?
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Old 08-16-2015, 10:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parajarcollective View Post
What's a good way to wear off bugs without over spraying bug spray?
A viable alternative to bug spray is sulfur powder. This is just the element sulfur. It is a yellow powder. You can dust it on your clothing and it will help to repel a number of insects. During my childhood we used it on the farm for chiggers.
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Old 01-12-2016, 03:36 AM
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I love camping, but i seldom camp. I am planning camping soon when my friends come back with me.
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Old 01-21-2016, 07:34 PM
Griz326 Griz326 is offline
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>>>AK-47s and AR-15s are not recommended for stopping a bear, so please do not post anything about those firearms here.

Why do you say that?
I've killed bear with a .223.
Here in bear country, you use the gun you have.

Most of us don't take AK or ARs on hikes though unless we're going to do some target practice
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