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Old 05-03-2019, 08:33 PM
third pig third pig is offline
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Originally Posted by Steve_In_29 View Post
I don't know about Federal laws but I do know that if your house/business is further then "X" miles (I am unsure as to the exact number) from a fire station that your insurance goes up pretty steeply.

When the subject of closing one of our local stations due to funding cuts was being debated the number thrown out was 5 miles.
ISO ratings are a bit more involved . Response time, staffing levels ,gallons per minute engines can flow , hydrants or not , number of men on engines and trucks ,number sent and on and on there are 100ís of things really . But youíre right five miles kills your rating automatically. But thatís not a city dept.

My dept has the highest rating , but many insurance companies, donít even go by it any more ,including State Farm the largest homeowner underwriter .

Our response time is less then four minutes from bunk to,your front door . You have to be fast out of the house , you cant make up,time on the road . I always wanted to be at the rig dressed and out the door in 30 seconds or so .
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Old 05-03-2019, 10:25 PM
penguinman000 penguinman000 is offline
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Less than 4 minutes from the bunk? I think you misspelled dinner table. 😉
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Old 05-04-2019, 01:03 AM
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The FD in the areas I worked were awesome. didn't matter that the houses weren't worth much to begin with... they were people's homes, and the FF never lost sight of that. Since there was always a pretty good chance someone was inside the vacant houses, they never slacked there, either.

EMS was part of the FD, and they were awesome, too. Far, far better than what I've seen in nice areas... the experience difference... saw them and FF do some great stuff, including saving ODs and initial psychological first aid/intervention for suicidal people...

Insurance company good rates for us were on-site accessible water with pumper truck either less than 2 miles away, or less than 5 miles away. They didn't care if FD was paid or volunteer, but they did care that we had some self-help stuff, so we had flappers, rakes, extra hoses, and fire extinguishers. Some people with the newer wells (skinny pipe that a fire hose couldn't go down) had hydrants (with pressure thingee) put in to get a better rate, and these paid for themselves inside of a year in lower premiums.
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Old 05-04-2019, 02:09 AM
randolphrowzeebragg randolphrowzeebragg is online now
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As a conservative, I believe that anything that decreases the size of government at all levels is good. Government grows when the money is available, but when the money supply shrinks, it becomes a crime to try and slap a few folks off of the teat.
After the Crash of '08, lots of cities, counties and states were forced to cut employees, and the country didn't collapse.
Government should not function as a device to provide employment.
Cut, cut, cut. When the government employees who are left over can't do the job, fire them and find some who can.
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Old 05-04-2019, 06:44 AM
PurpleKitty PurpleKitty is offline
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I am a crazy cat lady (3 cats). I have heard about pet masks you can donate to the local FD in case they pull some pets out that are still alive, but struggling, they can use the mask with some oxygen to get the critter back.

Is that something worth looking into? I'm not planning on burning the house down but God forbid it would really suck to lose the cats.
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Old 05-04-2019, 08:41 AM
WilliamAshley WilliamAshley is offline
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What you are describing is community policing is not quite correct. Community policing is where police officers gets to know people in the community. It is not a community volunteers being policeman.

Frankly sir, if you have the type of world that she was fast it would be filled with violence desecration death and horror. But perhaps that’s what you want.

There are different models of community policing. The ideal model will involve hiring from communities being policed by that force, including minorities as well as active involvement in joint community-policing programs including active recruitment of volunteer special constables from that community.

Personally I think the notion that policing wouldn't be done from the community is what causes the problems in communities because the police don't get to see how their actions really effect people. Policing originates in the concept of the hundreds but has turned into more of a military organization under the Prussian system. It really isn't good for building the community that is why you have people engaging in crime activities because society is being broken, and police actions are setting people back rather than putting them somewhere that they will be able to lead a law abiding lifestyle that is better than prison after they get out.

You need to have an active police presence to deter crime. You need to occupy people that would have a propensity toward criminal activity. You need to make reasonable laws that reflect the lifestyles that actually exist in communities and are normative. You need to have the community police itself and for the values and methods of community police to be representative of the norms of that community.

Air dropping in outsiders to a community, people still will be outsiders, you can take field anthropology and apply it to policing but it still won't create effective community policing. It is better than just sending in the troops to fight battles though. People will always consider air dropped police to be police not normal members of the community, they won't be viewed as people. It is essential that people police their own communities and that laws imposed on communities are consensual, agree with their values and beliefs, and are supported as beneficial to enforce. Otherwise frankly that is occupation and people won't be happy with it. It is also not as much the laws but rather how people go about enforcing those laws. I would suspect most felonies would not meet much resistance as being against norms but when you get into lesser criminal activity, it often ruins relationships between the police and the community as those actions tend to advantage the government and penalize the general public.
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Old 05-04-2019, 08:53 AM
WilliamAshley WilliamAshley is offline
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Originally Posted by bugbor View Post
I may've figured out WA's story. If he worked security, we may have a Genuine Mall Ninja on our board. Could he possibly even be up to the caliber of G Forty-five? Will we soon be regaled with tales of solar-powered tactical wheelbarrows? Body armor/solar panels? Could we be so lucky? Maybe get a group deal on autographs?
You guys can keep guessing. I worked as a bouncer mate. (special events, bars, night clubs, strip clubs, etc.. worked for private companies as well as in a college/university setting) I don't put off or claim to be things to have knowledge of those things. You don't need to be a police officer to see the effect of policing actions. Again police often suffer tunnel vision and see things occupationally not socially - not always but it happens a lot. They have one view, but self vision does not create what something is in society, it is a composite of views of everyone interacting with that thing. Police are generally fixated on occupation needs of their stakeholders. They more often than not will be there to act as enforcers of whatever dictates their oversight puts on them in regard to compliance and social limitations on behaviour. They are in effect agents of limitation and coercion and that leads to them getting a lot of negative associations in people that are damaged by policing actions even without from their perspective having done anything wrong, or the fact that the system is engineered to middle income standards so people of low incomes are often more serverely impacted (yes sj). Police are often highly respected for serious crimes (like grand jury felony stuff) but lots of nuisance crimes, tickets. misd class, the impacts of those activities often by people who are raised into criminal lifestyles, or for reasons of accident or inability to see the big picture are severely impacted and thrown into destructive lifestyles as a result of policing activities that attack and bring them down rather than simply correct behaviour and provide a means to lead a law abiding lifestyle.

Again you guys like to put down people rather than find information that is useful or beneficial for prepping.

Its just a game for you guys, playing politics, and attacking anything you want to silence and alienate.

Your fixation on myself is just odd to say the least. Why take so much time attacking someone? Why not just ignore me instead.

Instead you spend vast amounts of time posting misinformation, lies and attacking my character.

Alternative reasons, likely.

Again I am not the topic why don't you bugger off and put me on ignore. Or did you want to mine more data on my views of police in this thread about firefighting? Troll.

Anything else you want for the record?


I AM NOT THE TOPIC. Your data mining and character attacks are unwanted.
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Old 05-04-2019, 09:28 AM
penguinman000 penguinman000 is offline
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WilliamAshley-I'm not sure where to start with all you've said. Quite a bit to unpack. I guess I'll start with your volunteer contention.

I actually hit just about every wicket you label for a volunteer. I was an auxiliary police officer (volunteer cop) in a high crime/low income area. While I didn't live in the city, my full time job was in the city. Here are a couple of reasons why it isn't feasible to have volunteers as a major component of the police force:

1. It took 10 months of nights and weekends (20 hours a week roughly) to complete the police academy. We were trained to the same standards, had the same contact hours, took the same tests, etc... But to meet the number of hours required for the police academy it takes a significant amount of time if you aren't doing it on a full time basis.

2. I then had to complete 100 hours FTO AND get signed off by my FTO to meet the state minimum standard. And I had to do this in 1 month.

3. I had to attend court at least one day every other week. It was not uncommon to have court 2-3 days a week.

So not only are you looking at a substantial commitment of your own time, you have to be employed at a place where you can miss that much work. There aren't many employers who are going to let someone miss work on a regular basis to meet the obligations of their volunteer gig.

In addition to the police academy and working as a cop, I also have studied law enforcement and law enforcement related issues as part of my undergraduate/graduate studies. I say that to say this. The underlying principle of community policing is the belief that the community will, at some point at least, cooperate with law enforcement. There is an assumption that victims of crime will show up to court, citizens will work with law enforcement to get rid of criminals from their neighborhoods.

That doesn't happen. People don't cooperate. In many instances they do the opposite. They passively or actively (far too often violently) obstruct law enforcement's efforts to enforce the law. By not cooperating with law enforcement people are sending the message to the bad guys "come do your dirt in our neighborhood, you won't be held accountable."

Lastly, your statement that law enforcement is an "occupying force" is ridiculous. In addition to many other things, I have been part of "occupying forces" while in the military (Iraq and Afghanistan). Police do not act anything like an occupying force. While in Iraq or Afghanistan we followed fairly strict rules of engagement, entering homes, detaining people, etc.... None of those rules were grounded in a Constitutional law. We made the rules. If we wanted to go into someone's home the 4th amendment wasn't a consideration. At one point early on in Iraq video taping convoys was grounds to use lethal force (before anyone gets their panties in a wad, there was very legitimate reasoning for this).

The Constitution and Bill of Rights are drilled into your head during the police academy and during FTO (especially the 4th amendment). Aside from the occasional clown shoe who shouldn't be wearing a badge, every single contact an officer has with a citizen requires he/she consciously think about people's rights. From where the officer stands in relation to the citizen to what exactly you say.
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Old 05-04-2019, 10:04 AM
WilliamAshley WilliamAshley is offline
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Originally Posted by penguinman000 View Post
WilliamAshley-I'm not sure where to start with all you've said. Quite a bit to unpack. I guess I'll start with your volunteer contention.

I actually hit just about every wicket you label for a volunteer. I was an auxiliary police officer (volunteer cop) in a high crime/low income area. While I didn't live in the city, my full time job was in the city. Here are a couple of reasons why it isn't feasible to have volunteers as a major component of the police force:

1. It took 10 months of nights and weekends (20 hours a week roughly) to complete the police academy. We were trained to the same standards, had the same contact hours, took the same tests, etc... But to meet the number of hours required for the police academy it takes a significant amount of time if you aren't doing it on a full time basis.

2. I then had to complete 100 hours FTO AND get signed off by my FTO to meet the state minimum standard. And I had to do this in 1 month.

3. I had to attend court at least one day every other week. It was not uncommon to have court 2-3 days a week.
Yes, I agree, there are substantial time commitments. I also think training is important, not only for police trainees but in the work setting itself. The structure of that training can differ. I do think however there are many people who aren't working in policing that could be involved through police foundations contacts as well as in college programs where volunteer opportunities are put down the wire. I know of many instances of people who did college policing programs but didn't get into policing out of the gates but were still interested in doing it. Its not something that is a fix out of the gates, but rather something that takes time to develop in a community. Once upon a time, police actually came from the communities they policed and still do in some areas. But it has become a greater and greater trend that people put out job applications to every police force that is hiring with a decent salary and move close enough to get into work wherever they get hired.

Quote:
So not only are you looking at a substantial commitment of your own time, you have to be employed at a place where you can miss that much work. There aren't many employers who are going to let someone miss work on a regular basis to meet the obligations of their volunteer gig.
That is a structural issue and a force capacity issue. Having a bunch of volunteers available to work 1 day a week is supplemental. The court time thing is an issue but that in part is caused in how courts function on 9-5 business schedules when many people work. I know you can't change that but I would advocate for different court hours running wedneday to sunday if 5 days a week or atleast having one weekend day and hours that are closer to 11am to 7pm to better accommodate peoples work schedules.

Also I would consider community police partners to be "community liasons" of sorts. As time progressed more policing duties would be assigned, as I am guessing that is how it is done where you are.

The missed work thing is true of military reserve forces too however, so it is not unique. Most definitely though the structure to create availability is important. However as ghastly as it seems recruiting from the unemployed or long term unemployed is also an option including people with disabilities. Again I am not suggesting these people be "War fighters" nor social workers, but peace keepers who can provide community representation in criminal diversion activities. Its the framework of policing that would need to be altered to co-opt crime fighting activities by engaging the community and acting as community support workers that also serve legal functions and can interact on police functions. Again this would be supplemental particular for engaging in police contacts in areas where police will encounter negative contacts under normal circumstances but members of the community would not.


Quote:
In addition to the police academy and working as a cop, I also have studied law enforcement and law enforcement related issues as part of my undergraduate/graduate studies. I say that to say this. The underlying principle of community policing is the belief that the community will, at some point at least, cooperate with law enforcement.
sure

Quote:
There is an assumption that victims of crime will show up to court, citizens will work with law enforcement to get rid of criminals from their neighborhoods.

That doesn't happen. People don't cooperate. In many instances they do the opposite. They passively or actively (far too often violently) obstruct law enforcement's efforts to enforce the law. By not cooperating with law enforcement people are sending the message to the bad guys "come do your dirt in our neighborhood, you won't be held accountable."
sure, exactly.


Quote:
Lastly, your statement that law enforcement is an "occupying force" is ridiculous.
Its based on discussions I've had with people.


Quote:
In addition to many other things, I have been part of "occupying forces" while in the military (Iraq and Afghanistan). Police do not act anything like an occupying force. While in Iraq or Afghanistan we followed fairly strict rules of engagement, entering homes, detaining people, etc.... None of those rules were grounded in a Constitutional law. We made the rules. If we wanted to go into someone's home the 4th amendment wasn't a consideration. At one point early on in Iraq video taping convoys was grounds to use lethal force (before anyone gets their panties in a wad, there was very legitimate reasoning for this).
Police won't even stop to talk if I try to wave them down in these parts. I understand some police are out on calls for service, so are busy and have prioritized their schedule for all non emergency activities and may not stop unless in fact they don't have scheduled calls for service already. Generally, for anything involving police cooperation around here other than a 911 call it is "we don't do that". Crime reporting requires going to the station because they won't send police to do a report. When you do see police is whenever you leave your front door driving by and with their lights on every couple blocks making an arrest. It has an occupational feel.
Bear in mind I am not specifically biased against police, I have had good police interactions and bad ones, every cop is different and policing methods and standards can differ slightly from area to area. Personally, I am left not even reporting crimes simply due to the fact it will somehow get my name in a police report that can later be paraphrased and manipulated to be used against me rather that represent me as a victim of crime. In the last few months I've had theft, death threats, assault, fraud, and home invasion all happen only the fraud was reported but in that case the police said it was civil not criminal so wouldn't do an investigation. Now bear in mind when a neighbour was assaulted by the person who did the home invasion and likely the theft the police did show up, but what happened, meanwhile what happened, the guy who did the assault was evicted and pretty much now is probably homeless, maybe in jail, but overall no real fixing of the issue just deferring it until the criminal is let out again.


Quote:
The Constitution and Bill of Rights are drilled into your head during the police academy and during FTO (especially the 4th amendment). Aside from the occasional clown shoe who shouldn't be wearing a badge, every single contact an officer has with a citizen requires he/she consciously think about people's rights. From where the officer stands in relation to the citizen to what exactly you say.
Yes but as much as you want it to be true the law is not the law, it is generally social convention and customs that have the law made by oversight who often don't represent those communities bootstrapped to that environment. If the people being policed - the ones getting the contacts actually had a say in making the law, seriously, police wouldn't get quite the same level of obstruction as police are often viewed as "pigs" because they are thought of as being out to get people, to gather the facts needed for arrest or achieving the ends. It is just the nature how call in policing works these days. They have the complaint, they investigate the complaint if it is a breach of the peace, but the investigation is to gather the facts that will establish elements of arrest, or yield criminal intelligence. Overall the model is not social work in that police are there to figure out what happened and why so they can fix the problem. See the difference between policing and peace keeping?


The trends in policing generally state that police generally hang out with other police, this isolated fraternal order. That really isn't being in the community. The problem exists where the fact is people break the law all the time and it is difficult to be police in a community where everyone is breaking the law if you are expected to arrest people for breach of the law. It goes to the biased policing needs in that police start to question whether "they need" to make arrests or obtain warrants for criminal activity, introducing corruption issues.

The point though is that to be effective at having good rapport in a community you need to have good police contacts on a regular basis. If all your interactions are negative contacts you become an opposition force that is occupational. This is not only true in policing but most environments of social interaction. Only certain types of policing will gain community respect, others will create anomie and hate in a community that will be directed toward police because they are viewed as the cause of the issues by escalating the scope of community conflicts.
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Old 05-04-2019, 11:14 AM
penguinman000 penguinman000 is offline
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The law is not the law? Tell that to an inmate. That statement is such a twisted attempt at philosophical reasoning I’m sure John Austin is spinning in his grave.

As far as recruiting from within communities go, people from high crime/low income neighborhoods aren’t knocking down the doors to join the PD or FD. That’s the reason the demographics of most agencies don’t reflect the communities they serve. This is one of the unpleasant truths local elected leaders need to honestly confront.

In none of what you’ve posted have you even hinted at the fact that the citizenry bear as much responsibility as anyone else for the state of their communities.

Also, law enforcement’s role isn’t community building. It’s enforcing the law. That maintains stability so the elected leaders and citizenry can build the community. It’s part of the whole legislative and executive separation of powers the Constitution insists on. This is a fundamental misunderstanding far to prevalent.

Pushing all accountability on law enforcement for society’s ills is what drives good people out of the profession.

I’m at as loss with engaging you. I’m not sure if you’re trolling, lack life experience, are the product of a poor education, or are just unable/unwilling to recognize the cognitive dissonance and illogical thought flow that is threaded within your voluminous posts.

I guess we’ll agree to disagree. Good luck and I wish you success.
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Old 05-04-2019, 11:30 AM
WilliamAshley WilliamAshley is offline
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The law is not the law? Tell that to an inmate. That statement is such a twisted attempt at philosophical reasoning I’m sure John Austin is spinning in his grave.
Its all where you are coming from. Again there is a difference between rule by consent and rule by force. The people that have enfranchisement in the system are often ruled by consent, but in some cases place themselves outside the law, such as immunities and priveleges enjoyed by legilsators and those in the justice system, as well as blue wall corruption practices that crop up from time to time, and special leniency for those involved in the administration of justice.

What most others experience is rule by force, they have no enfranchisement in the laws the are forced on them at risk to their financial and physical security.

Bear in mind there really are dirt bags that transgress social convention but overall I cannot stepoutside without seeing violations of "the law" it is a common occurrence. Infractions are everywhere. So "the law" and what actually rules peoples lives are two different things. This is why there is so much conflict because of how people actually want to live their life and their limitations put on them by non consensual rule.

So most definitely the law is what binds people so legislation is not law if it does not bind people by consent. Law enforcement is a way of physical insuring people are bound by challenging habeas corpus when consent and self limitation does not apply.


Quote:
As far as recruiting from within communities go, people from high crime/low income neighborhoods aren’t knocking down the doors to join the PD or FD. That’s the reason the demographics of most agencies don’t reflect the communities they serve. This is one of the unpleasant truths local elected leaders need to honestly confront.
Again the issue is seeking perfection where improvement is a better goal.

Quote:
In none of what you’ve posted have you even hinted at the fact that the citizenry bear as much responsibility as anyone else for the state of their communities.

Also, law enforcement’s role isn’t community building. It’s enforcing the law.
I think that is the problem with what policing has become in some areas. Policing really does need to be a public service that helps to build stronger communities, that are more able to live in peace and mutual objective.

Quote:
That maintains stability so the elected leaders and citizenry can build the community.
It doesn't. It provides stability for some people at the cost of others.
In some communities criminal acts are a minority and in those circumstances often you won't have the concept of occupational policing. However in other areas the opposite is true.



Quote:

I’m at as loss with engaging you. I’m not sure if you’re trolling, lack life experience, are the product of a poor education, or are just unable/unwilling to recognize the cognitive dissonance and illogical thought flow that is threaded within your voluminous posts.
Nope just don't have the same views on policing as you.


I think the social contract is an important concept in good policing.
https://www.iep.utm.edu/soc-cont/

I think police have unique challenges because of the social functions requirements of their functionary role in society. In some situations I think the law doesn't make things better but I am a positivist duty driven person, that is why I didn't go into law enforcement. I think negligence of duty is reprehensible but the law is seriously flawed in convention of social justice requirements to build a society held together by natural justice.

I'm not speaking from one position. It is commentary not discussion.
Good day.



/ˈkšmənˌterē/
noun
noun: commentary; plural noun: commentaries
an expression of opinions or offering of explanations explanations about an event or situation.
"an editorial commentary"
a descriptive spoken account (especially on a broadcast) of an event or performance as it happens.
synonyms:
narration, description, account, report, review, analysis
"he spent the morning listening to the test match commentary"
a set of explanatory or critical notes on a text.
"a commentary on the Old Testament"
synonyms:
explanation, explication, elucidation, exegesis, examination, interpretation, analysis; More











dis∑cus∑sion
/dəˈskəSH(ə)n/
noun
noun: discussion
the action or process of talking about something in order to reach a decision or to exchange ideas.
"the proposals are not a blueprint but ideas for discussion"
a conversation or debate about a certain topic.
plural noun: discussions
"discussions about environmental improvement programs"
synonyms:
conversation, talk, dialogue, discourse, conference, debate, exchange of views, consultation, deliberation; More
powwow, chat, tÍte-ŗ-tÍte, heart-to-heart;
seminar, symposium;
talks, negotiations, parley;
argument, dispute;
adda;
korero;
informalconfab, chitchat, rap;
informalskull session, bull session;
informalconvo;
formalconfabulation;
rarepalaver, colloquy, converse, interlocution
"after a long discussion with her husband, she came to a decision"
a detailed treatment of a particular topic in speech or writing.
synonyms:
examination, exploration, analysis, study, review, scrutiny; More












I'm not here for dialog I am here for information.
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Old 05-04-2019, 06:18 PM
PurpleKitty PurpleKitty is offline
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He's a troll. Don't waste your time with him.
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Old 05-04-2019, 06:57 PM
benson56 benson56 is offline
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He's a blood relative of Napoleon Dynamite.
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Old 05-04-2019, 09:05 PM
penguinman000 penguinman000 is offline
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https://www.dictionary.com/
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Old 05-04-2019, 09:07 PM
penguinman000 penguinman000 is offline
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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positivism

I’m
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Old 05-05-2019, 12:35 AM
WilliamAshley WilliamAshley is offline
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good luck. systems differ globally and culturally. Your logical systems are based upon your worldview. Worldviews differ. Although I suspect you are an empiricist, beware at your own folly an inability to understand from others rather than yourself.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empiricism


https://philosophy.stackexchange.com...ir-differences

There is a rabbit hole.

Learning about human interactions with DMT can better help you understand that the human condition is not confined to relativity, science, or mathematics but is ultimately an undefining spiritual experience whose potential is unbound. Humans naturally produce DMT and can expand on the health of their pineal gland. Perhaps some day. None the less I understand you are in the box. Hold on tight.
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Old 05-05-2019, 01:26 AM
randolphrowzeebragg randolphrowzeebragg is online now
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"In addition to the police academy and working as a cop, I also have studied law enforcement and law enforcement related issues as part of my undergraduate/graduate studies. I say that to say this. The underlying principle of community policing is the belief that the community will, at some point at least, cooperate with law enforcement. There is an assumption that victims of crime will show up to court, citizens will work with law enforcement to get rid of criminals from their neighborhoods.

That doesn't happen. People don't cooperate. In many instances they do the opposite. They passively or actively (far too often violently) obstruct law enforcement's efforts to enforce the law. By not cooperating with law enforcement people are sending the message to the bad guys "come do your dirt in our neighborhood, you won't be held accountable.""

"Lastly, your statement that law enforcement is an "occupying force" is ridiculous. In addition to many other things, I have been part of "occupying forces" while in the military (Iraq and Afghanistan). Police do not act anything like an occupying force. While in Iraq or Afghanistan we followed fairly strict rules of engagement, entering homes, detaining people, etc.... None of those rules were grounded in a Constitutional law. We made the rules. If we wanted to go into someone's home the 4th amendment wasn't a consideration. At one point early on in Iraq video taping convoys was grounds to use lethal force (before anyone gets their panties in a wad, there was very legitimate reasoning for this)."

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No offense there officer, but it seems that you're describing how people respond to an occupying force, redefining the concept by saying that an occupying force isn't an occupying force, and then justifying the redefinition by claiming that your organization's accepted policy isn't to shoot people on sight if they turn on a camera, which was the accepted policy of an occupying force in Iraq.
That kind of absolutist rationalization isn't necessary if an argument is valid based on verifiable, widely accepted evidence.
Where I used to live, the County Sheriff's Office was trying to hold up the county by saying that if they didn't get a gold-plated retirement package, they'd use their advanced skills and training to find a jobs somewhere else, and the county would devolve into anarchistic chaos.
When the cost of the retirement package was leaked to the taxpayers, they basically responded by saying that if the deputies were going to find jobs elsewhere, "we hate to see you go, but we'll probably bite the bullet and do our best to get by without you." The county didn't collapse, but in the next election, the voters put another County Sheriff in office.
When anyone convinces himself that the world can't function without him, inevitably, someone teaches him that not only can the world get by fine without him, but within a month or two, nobody will miss him.
Too many government employees have deluded themselves into believing that the world can't get by without them.
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Old 05-05-2019, 12:23 PM
AZ_HighCountry AZ_HighCountry is offline
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Do like I do: simply ignore him. Why feed troll posts?
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Old 05-05-2019, 12:39 PM
Calgary-John Calgary-John is offline
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Originally Posted by WilliamAshley View Post
I'm sorry but how did we get refugees from California to "criminals"

who exactly are you talking about here.

We've already indicated there is about 1000 new refugees to Houston each calander year, are you implying that refugees are criminals? Where is the evidence of that?

Or are you saying people emigrating from California to Houston who are not refugees are criminals,

or both?

Is there a rise in the crime rate to explain that suddenly there are more people with criminal records in California moving to Houston?

I want to see the evidence.

Not saying it isn't possible just saying you have provided no evidence of that.

I'm not the type of person to bring people into a Shbag world, no worries. I generally am not into acrobatic lovemaking. Yoga is great though, got to get that stretching in. Safety first. Oh right is that the topic?



LOL oh my right the maga talking point any new people to an area must be criminals coming to invade... forgot, but seriously do you really think people who are moving to Houston are all criminals?

Why the hell would you move to Houston to be a criminal, the roads there are terrible to get from job to job. You'd be stuck in traffic for hours just trying to get from one robbery to the next. That is like moving to new Orleans to be a courier driver, who does that? Seriously do some research and share it here. Your talking points are total nonsense.

The crime rate went down by over 4% last year, and the violent crime rate reduced by more than 10% this was with the public safety cuts.

I'd love to hear your version based on scientific values, you know statistics, reports etc.. rather than just BS coming from a fringe right wing movement that lies to distort public policy and sway the uneducated to their banner.

IN fact the gang war going on in Houston right now is GOOD for regular folks cause they are killing each other.
There is a direct correlation between Increased immigration and crime, whether legal or not. Homogenous societies tend to see minimal crime, already Western countries. We can look at Scandinavia, overwhelming homogenous with a small Immigrant/refugee population, yet that small portion of the population is responsible for the majority of crimes.

There is nothing racist about this, Iím not saying people are better or worse than others, but do not ignore links and facts between things just because they donít make you feel good on the inside or could be deemed offensive to others.
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:27 PM
WilliamAshley WilliamAshley is offline
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Originally Posted by Calgary-John View Post
There is a direct correlation between Increased immigration and crime, whether legal or not. Homogenous societies tend to see minimal crime, already Western countries. We can look at Scandinavia, overwhelming homogenous with a small Immigrant/refugee population, yet that small portion of the population is responsible for the majority of crimes.

There is nothing racist about this, I’m not saying people are better or worse than others, but do not ignore links and facts between things just because they don’t make you feel good on the inside or could be deemed offensive to others.
Absolute nonsense. You can look to tons of latin American countries with massive crime rates that are effectively homogenous societies.

Crime correspond to poverty rates contrasted with the legal structure and number of law enforcement agents, and the ability of the court system to process trials. There is no shortage of crime.

You need to classify criminality and the fact that "crimes differ" based on culture.

While some crimes are more universalized the vast majority of petty offences are cultural offences or public order offenses are nuisances that are used to basically tear apart peoples lives who transgress without perspective on the social damage penalization of nuisance has on society over the course of lifetimes rather than diversion and reprogramming that the justice system does not offer. Jail and prisons aren't environments people learn to integrate and function in society or correct behavioural or history backgrounds that led to formal sanctions.

Scandanavia has massive immigration mate.

Immigrant crime threshold corresponds to poverty driven crime, with about 1 in 10 immigrants unemployed vs the general population of about 1 in 20. People working off the record are driven to grey and black market employment that is directly related to criminal enterprise.

The amount spent on policing could easily be diverted into direct employment programs and the crime rate would drop.

The other part is driven by substance abuse, and criminalized activities like the criminalization of sex trades and other public order and morality offences. That in turn creates organized crime markets and the penal system that further organizes and perpetuated criminal subcultures as a means of subsistence and better living than lawful society provides for slave labour lumpen proletariat.

This is all massively off topic though, as the thread is about firefighter layoffs, not policing in Houston.


The idea that homogenous socities do not suffer crime is just nonsense.

However the concept of homogenous is also massive ignorant of subcultures.

Like saying china is homogenous is absolutely false if you actually know about china the same can be said for pretty much all countries is the fact there are no homogenous countries except perhaps Mongolia and Iceland.

Its all about how laws effect people, and the class systems that exist that create inequalities in peoples access to quality of life and access to the justice structures that provide social justice. Its mostly just a byproduct of the society that perpetuates subcultural practices through eggdropping criminal identities into peoples framework of living, thus largely an effect of the media they interact with in their development and daily living to form habitus and constraints on agency or potential.
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