MaxTrax - Traction Boards - Page 2 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New to Survivalist Boards silverhobo55 New Member Introduction 16 02-17-2019 04:15 PM
Getting better traction on a wet hillside rafedawg Vehicles & Transportation 14 08-16-2017 01:05 PM
Traction spikes for boots (ice and snow) McAngus Wilderness Survival, Hiking and Camping Forum 13 07-25-2017 11:53 PM
Survivalist Boards Community Bulletin ? tom42 Site Information & Suggestion Box 0 11-23-2016 10:49 PM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-13-2019, 03:55 AM
drobs's Avatar
drobs drobs is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Africa - Missouri
Posts: 7,833
Thanks: 11,406
Thanked 7,491 Times in 3,887 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

Here's a $68.80 set of traction boards on Amazon for those looking to save some $. I note the prices jumped on them after I ordered my set at $58.

https://www.amazon.com/MAXFAVOR-Trac...%2C309&sr=8-36
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-14-2019, 08:37 AM
Brettny Brettny is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Ny
Posts: 1,504
Thanks: 311
Thanked 1,278 Times in 692 Posts
Default

A tire deflator? I just remove the core. Way quicker and easier.

If your going to air down you should have a compressor. If your going to air way down you should also have a can of starting fluid and know how to use it to get the bead back on. The Thrush brand is the best for this.
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-14-2019, 08:50 AM
Fire_fighter Fire_fighter is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 273
Thanks: 246
Thanked 1,075 Times in 238 Posts
Default

Cant tell you how many emt's and firefights use a back board (long spine board) to the same effect.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Fire_fighter For This Useful Post:
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-14-2019, 11:54 AM
Eddie_T's Avatar
Eddie_T Eddie_T is online now
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Southern mtns near eastern continental divide
Posts: 2,265
Thanks: 3,811
Thanked 2,649 Times in 1,400 Posts
Default

PepBoys has the 1050 for $49.95 on ebay, https://www.ebay.com/p/MasterFlow-Po...7420849&chn=ps
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-14-2019, 01:42 PM
Steve_In_29 Steve_In_29 is offline
Semper Fi
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St John's, AZ
Posts: 5,877
Thanks: 7,340
Thanked 10,312 Times in 3,726 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brettny View Post
A tire deflator? I just remove the core. Way quicker and easier.

If your going to air down you should have a compressor. If your going to air way down you should also have a can of starting fluid and know how to use it to get the bead back on. The Thrush brand is the best for this.
The problem with removing the core is that it can be easily dropped in the dirt and possibly get some stuck in it or even lost.

I prefer the screw on deflators that just depress the valve. On my Bronco (35" tires) I screw on the first one, count about 20 seconds and then screw in the rest with 20 seconds between each. By the time I finish the 4th the 1st is about ready to remove to get me at normal trail pressure.

I tried the preset type that are supposed to shut off by themselves but they never were accurate nor consistent.
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-14-2019, 01:45 PM
ClovisMan's Avatar
ClovisMan ClovisMan is offline
Apocaloptimist
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: New Braunfels, TX
Posts: 2,587
Thanks: 273
Thanked 6,086 Times in 1,640 Posts
Default

My approach is a little different. I just refuse to get stuck. Seems to be working out for now.
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-15-2019, 06:57 AM
drobs's Avatar
drobs drobs is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Africa - Missouri
Posts: 7,833
Thanks: 11,406
Thanked 7,491 Times in 3,887 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brettny View Post
A tire deflator? I just remove the core. Way quicker and easier.

If your going to air down you should have a compressor. If your going to air way down you should also have a can of starting fluid and know how to use it to get the bead back on. The Thrush brand is the best for this.
The tire deflator removes / holds the core out.
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-17-2019, 10:22 PM
Metcalf's Avatar
Metcalf Metcalf is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Southwest Comirado
Posts: 4,414
Thanks: 1,454
Thanked 7,081 Times in 2,800 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_In_29 View Post
The problem with removing the core is that it can be easily dropped in the dirt and possibly get some stuck in it or even lost.

I prefer the screw on deflators that just depress the valve. On my Bronco (35" tires) I screw on the first one, count about 20 seconds and then screw in the rest with 20 seconds between each. By the time I finish the 4th the 1st is about ready to remove to get me at normal trail pressure.

I tried the preset type that are supposed to shut off by themselves but they never were accurate nor consistent.
I've been pulling cores to air down for 30 years, it really isn't that big of a deal. Carry a few spare cores if you are worried about fumbling one.
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-19-2019, 07:11 PM
Steve_In_29 Steve_In_29 is offline
Semper Fi
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St John's, AZ
Posts: 5,877
Thanks: 7,340
Thanked 10,312 Times in 3,726 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metcalf View Post
I've been pulling cores to air down for 30 years, it really isn't that big of a deal. Carry a few spare cores if you are worried about fumbling one.
Yet others can and do lose them.

My way totally avoids the possability.
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-19-2019, 08:31 PM
Metcalf's Avatar
Metcalf Metcalf is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Southwest Comirado
Posts: 4,414
Thanks: 1,454
Thanked 7,081 Times in 2,800 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_In_29 View Post
Yet others can and do lose them.

My way totally avoids the possability.
And takes forever. I'll air up and down more than once in a day, with a little practice loosing a core isn't a huge deal. Heck, a 100 spares would take up very little space.....
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-19-2019, 11:42 PM
Hilltopper Hilltopper is offline
A marathon not a sprint
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,299
Thanks: 21,629
Thanked 15,591 Times in 3,834 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by drobs View Post
More snow MaxTrax usage, plus airing down, tire chains, and winching.

Expedition Overland: North America Ep3 - YouTube
Bwa ha ha ha, that first cover shot on that clip looks like my driveway , add a ravine with drop offs and a roller coaster hill to climb . Got to love beautiful British Columbia
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-20-2019, 04:24 AM
Steve_In_29 Steve_In_29 is offline
Semper Fi
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St John's, AZ
Posts: 5,877
Thanks: 7,340
Thanked 10,312 Times in 3,726 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metcalf View Post
And takes forever. I'll air up and down more than once in a day, with a little practice loosing a core isn't a huge deal. Heck, a 100 spares would take up very little space.....
A couple minutes is hardly "forever".

You and anyone else are obviously free to do it any way you like. I just pointed out a valid downside to pulling cores.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Steve_In_29 For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2019, 01:34 PM
Metcalf's Avatar
Metcalf Metcalf is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Southwest Comirado
Posts: 4,414
Thanks: 1,454
Thanked 7,081 Times in 2,800 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_In_29 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metcalf View Post
And takes forever. I'll air up and down more than once in a day, with a little practice loosing a core isn't a huge deal. Heck, a 100 spares would take up very little space.....
A couple minutes is hardly "forever".

You and anyone else are obviously free to do it any way you like. I just pointed out a valid downside to pulling cores.
Yup, do what works for you. I run very large tires. Changing from highway pressure in to single digits takes a LONG time using a deflator that leaves the core in place.

I've even experimented with drilling out the center of the valve stems below the seat a bit to make it even faster.

At some point, being able to pull the core is handy for other things like reseating a bead. Cores also fail. I would carry a few ( and a stem ) spares and a 4 way core tool to help with those issues even if you don't want to pull the cores to air down.
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-20-2019, 04:29 PM
Steve_In_29 Steve_In_29 is offline
Semper Fi
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St John's, AZ
Posts: 5,877
Thanks: 7,340
Thanked 10,312 Times in 3,726 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metcalf View Post
Yup, do what works for you. I run very large tires. Changing from highway pressure in to single digits takes a LONG time using a deflator that leaves the core in place.

I've even experimented with drilling out the center of the valve stems below the seat a bit to make it even faster.

At some point, being able to pull the core is handy for other things like reseating a bead. Cores also fail. I would carry a few ( and a stem ) spares and a 4 way core tool to help with those issues even if you don't want to pull the cores to air down.
I never said I didn't keep the appropriate spare parts in my rig.

YMMV but I never had to pull a core to re-seat a bead. Ratchet strap around the tire or worst case some starting fluid and a match have always done the trick for me.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Steve_In_29 For This Useful Post:
Old 03-21-2019, 12:28 AM
Aerindel's Avatar
Aerindel Aerindel is offline
Abnormality biased.
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Nuevo Alamo
Posts: 5,689
Thanks: 6,911
Thanked 13,371 Times in 4,317 Posts
Default

Always interesting what people consider normal. I've never aired down my tires...but sometimes I put on tire chains every day. I've never removed a valve core..but I repair tire punctures in the field fairly often so I have plugs and patches and prybars.
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2019, 09:58 AM
Metcalf's Avatar
Metcalf Metcalf is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Southwest Comirado
Posts: 4,414
Thanks: 1,454
Thanked 7,081 Times in 2,800 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_In_29 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metcalf View Post
Yup, do what works for you. I run very large tires. Changing from highway pressure in to single digits takes a LONG time using a deflator that leaves the core in place.

I've even experimented with drilling out the center of the valve stems below the seat a bit to make it even faster.

At some point, being able to pull the core is handy for other things like reseating a bead. Cores also fail. I would carry a few ( and a stem ) spares and a 4 way core tool to help with those issues even if you don't want to pull the cores to air down.
I never said I didn't keep the appropriate spare parts in my rig.

YMMV but I never had to pull a core to re-seat a bead. Ratchet strap around the tire or worst case some starting fluid and a match have always done the trick for me.
I've fought my fair share. Pulling the core helps. I agree that a strap or an explosion can help. We run a lot of beadlocks these days, and most of the normal wheels are running 2-3 wraps of gorilla tape over the safety beads to make it much more difficult to push the tire off the bead.
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2019, 03:01 PM
Czechsix Czechsix is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Meadow Lakes, Alaska
Posts: 188
Thanks: 18
Thanked 146 Times in 72 Posts
Default

I've used Maxtrax for years, they work but you have to be careful with wheel spin, that'll tear them up.

I used them most on the 16.5 wheel truck, hard to air that sucker down enough sometimes, without it spitting a tire off due to the bead design.

Anyway, they work, but there are other options that are much less expensive too.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Czechsix For This Useful Post:
Old 03-24-2019, 07:44 PM
4X4's Avatar
4X4 4X4 is offline
Basket of deplorables
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 902
Thanks: 3,965
Thanked 2,788 Times in 744 Posts
Default

I know this is about Maxtrax however in reading a lot of the comments about the different methods to air down was interesting. Since I don't like to have a lot of difficulty with this I don't pull the core because it just in my opinion can lead to more trouble. My favorite method is using my Staun tire deflators. There are lots of variants on the market but Staun is pretty solid. Once you get them set you are good to go. Stop at the trail head and by the time you get the 4th one on the first one has just about aired down and stopped at the pre-designated tire pressure.

http://www.fourwheeler.com/how-to/wh...ator-shootout/
https://www.desertrat.com/i-23320198...-6-30-psi.html
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to 4X4 For This Useful Post:
Old 03-24-2019, 09:20 PM
Metcalf's Avatar
Metcalf Metcalf is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Southwest Comirado
Posts: 4,414
Thanks: 1,454
Thanked 7,081 Times in 2,800 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aerindel View Post
Always interesting what people consider normal. I've never aired down my tires...but sometimes I put on tire chains every day. I've never removed a valve core..but I repair tire punctures in the field fairly often so I have plugs and patches and prybars.
Why haven't you tried airing down your tires? It makes a HUGE difference in off-road vehicle performance. I would say it is better than chains over a broader range of terrain. It is also just about free. Chains tear up a lot more stuff....body panels, brake lines, etc.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Metcalf For This Useful Post:
Old 03-25-2019, 01:51 AM
drobs's Avatar
drobs drobs is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Africa - Missouri
Posts: 7,833
Thanks: 11,406
Thanked 7,491 Times in 3,887 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metcalf View Post
Why haven't you tried airing down your tires? It makes a HUGE difference in off-road vehicle performance. I would say it is better than chains over a broader range of terrain. It is also just about free. Chains tear up a lot more stuff....body panels, brake lines, etc.
I cant speak for Aerindel, but the times I used chains were for short stretches of snow / ice. Faster to put on and take off a set of chains than airing down and airing back up tires - especially with the junk tire inflator I had.
Quick reply to this message
Reply

Bookmarks



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net