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Old 02-17-2017, 04:29 PM
Rural Buckeye Guy Rural Buckeye Guy is offline
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Default Bicycles as BOL or GHV



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My work is around 75 miles from my house, add in my BOL and that increases to 100 miles from work. That's two weeks walking at my age, if I make it ar all. Alot of us probably have those long walks.....so I bought a used mtn bike from Craigs List and keep it at my brother's house, 7 miles from my work, and a small footlocker with my GHB so I can walk there, rest up and start out before dawn in the wee hours. I figure I can be home and out at the BOL I by the end of the fourth day. Afterwards, the bikes will come in handy for OP / FOR guard changes or LRRP operations. Any thoughts or ideas?
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Old 02-17-2017, 05:12 PM
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My work is around 75 miles from my house, add in my BOL and that increases to 100 miles from work. That's two weeks walking at my age, if I make it ar all. Alot of us probably have those long walks.....so I bought a used mtn bike from Craigs List and keep it at my brother's house, 7 miles from my work, and a small footlocker with my GHB so I can walk there, rest up and start out before dawn in the wee hours. I figure I can be home and out at the BOL I by the end of the fourth day. Afterwards, the bikes will come in handy for OP / FOR guard changes or LRRP operations. Any thoughts or ideas?
I kept a hybrid bike in my office the last 20 yrs before retirement. I rode it at work several times per week. Home was 12 miles away and summer temps could reach 115F. If I waited till sunset, I could ride it in 45-50 minutes.
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Old 02-18-2017, 01:43 AM
survivedall survivedall is offline
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Put a prepuncture product in your tyres, it'll (hopefully) prevent a tyre completely deflating if punctured

Make sure you have repair & maintenance tools with the bike

Make sure you have spare parts (cables, brake blocks)

Consider pumps that can take the CO2 cartridges, they make life much easier to get that last little bit of air into a tyre

Consider a bike rack and a few bungee straps and possibly get panniers. The rack and bungee straps will let you carry your GHB without it having to be on your back. Helps balance and is safer should you fall off

If they aren't fitted to your bike already you could get strapless toe clips as well

Don't forget your skid lid (aka helmet) !!
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Old 02-18-2017, 03:02 AM
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Bike Shorts - two pair to rotate each day, worn without underwear along with a tube of Chamois Butt'r.

If this is your plan you need to practice it and see if it will really work for you. There is a lot of knowledge to gather from experience. Ride a couple hundred miles in the next month and find out what works and what doesn't work. Heck, your in Ohio, you could practice the 200 miles in one weekend at TOSRV.org
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Old 02-18-2017, 04:16 AM
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Firstly, google "Bicycle touring" and you can find some non-shtf usage of long distance bicycle travel.

I like the idea of a survival/bug out bicycle for numerous reasons, but I would definitely recommend getting a pannier rack and if possible bags. I have been experimented with a setup, and I learnt how much of a difference lowered weight makes. In my tests in the AO I was in I could easily get 50km per day sustained with a full inch bag on a rear rack and have multiple hours of daylight left for other camp/hunting/etc tasks. Admittedly I am still young.

You may want to look into upgrading your bikes tyres to more rugged "touring tyres". These are a relatively cheap upgrade (good ones are around $40- $50 per tyre), they are less likey to puncture and will likely have less rolling resistance then your mountain bike tyres meaning it will be (alot) easier to cover distance. Also you will need lots of water accessable on the bike that you can get to without stopping (I factor 6L per day while riding: 3 1L bottles + a 3L camelbak)

I have bikes setup for inch system that also double for hunting (shtf moving to game richer areas and to carry meat out fast and easily) and scouting/recon.

If you need more inspiration, I also previously did the math (and partially tested), if you mount front/rear pannier racks and you have a small trailer, I can pack a full months supplies and still be mobile. The only needed resupply for this plan was water every 3 to 5 days. I consider this an order of magnitude better then bugging out on foot, and you can alway carry your bicycle in your bug out vehicle/car in an emergency.
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Old 02-19-2017, 08:48 AM
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Good option for GHV...If there is room for full size bike...great...bit there are some "folding" bikes available...getting home from work, etc...when your vehicle can't due to EMP, blocked roads, breakdown...will be crucial. "Police" designed bikes available too...more rugged than "walmart" bikes.

Important, Practice the ride periodically...in all weather. If you are in snow country, there are tire options to consider having. Keep GH (get home) bag with you with the essential items mentioned in other posts. Slime filled tubes or tires will be a must. GH bag should also be able to carry on your back....just in case bike fails.
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Old 02-19-2017, 09:13 AM
daibutsu daibutsu is offline
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Certainly everyone has different needs and abilities, but for me a bike with a single wheel Bob trailer, (yup, the real name, searchable) is my primary 'get anywhere' vehicle. I have about a 120 mile trip to my final place, and it doesn't hurt me that, altho being 62,, I bike commute, bike pack, and backpack a lot anyhow. Regardless, i think anyone in basically reasonable shape with a properly fitted bike can can put in quite a few miles for a day or maybe two: the real difference between the real 'in shape' vs the occasional rider is the ability to do it day after day after day.

Here is a great site to peruse for excellent lists and journals from bike commuters from around the world who offer lots of insight:
www.crazyguyonabike.com
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Old 02-19-2017, 09:30 AM
dyingslower dyingslower is offline
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I'm sorry, but IMO, this is a recipe for trouble.

Don't wanna walk at your age? Okay, how about taking a tumble off of a bike at your age? And before you think about how careful and steady you are, remember, the WHOLE IDEA hinges on the assumption that people will leave you alone to ride where and as you please.

You are totally vulnerable on a bike. Totally. Unlike a car, it takes both hands and both feet in constant use. A guy with a stick takes you down. A guy that simply grabs your arm takes you down. A guy with a bat takes you down, takes your bike, and you don't get up. Oh sure, you can be vulnerable in a car or on foot, but the former is not vulnerable to sticks and bats and the latter is not a target in the first place.

IMO, it makes taking a rough walk look easy.

Hiking to your BOL might require a day or two of recuperation, but riding a bike to your BOL might be something you never recover from. Just sayin....


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Old 02-19-2017, 11:51 AM
reppans reppans is offline
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Bicycles make ideal BOV/GHVs.... I love folding bikes personally - you can keep one unobtrusively stowed in your office or car trunk with the big plus of it being there for fun/exercise/local transport when needed. They're also great for multi-modal travel ie, maybe you just need to pedal out of a localized problem area, and then hop on any type of public transport or a hitched/bribed ride for the remainder.

I don't necessarily agree with the vulnerability of a bicycle. I was in Manhattan for the 911 lockdown, Northeast Blackout 2003, and near it for Sandy. IMHO, folks will be mostly law-abiding in the beginning and you'll be among the safety of crowds making the same exodus. It'll take a while for things to turn so ugly that you'll become a target. If it does get to that point, with a little situational awareness, you'll know when to dump the bike. If it does become totally lawless, I think motor vehicles with be useless - the bad guys (or even stupid accidents) can turn the roadways into instant parking lots just by parking a truck or dropping a tree across the road, and then it will be like shooting fish in a barrel. Think I rather have a bike to quickly backtrack that situation, bushwack to a parrallel road, or climb over the obstruction (if the risk has passed).
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Old 02-19-2017, 12:09 PM
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Default Bikes for getting Home

I think this is a great idea. I used to commute 75 miles to work and often thought about having to walk it home in the event of a grid down event. I did take my bike to the office a few times and left it locked up in my truck, but that got risky (for being stolen) and a lot of work packing it in and out. Thankfully, I work from home now.

But, I'm planning for my son to go off to college this Fall and looking at a solution like this. Probably not more than 120-300 miles is where we're looking and I'm wanting him to have his bike for rec too. So, probably considering a new MTN or Hybrid Bike with some panniers or other - still researching. He currently rides a Full Suspension GT, but will probably put that aside for something more road worthy and newer. We'll see.

Has anyone looked at these folding bikes?
http://www.safecastle.com/montague-folding-bikes.aspx

Schwinn also makes a single speed fold
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...schwin+folding
Not for everyone but may be something to consider.
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Old 02-19-2017, 01:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Rural Buckeye Guy View Post
My work is around 75 miles from my house, add in my BOL and that increases to 100 miles from work. That's two weeks walking at my age, if I make it ar all. Alot of us probably have those long walks.....so I bought a used mtn bike from Craigs List and keep it at my brother's house, 7 miles from my work, and a small footlocker with my GHB so I can walk there, rest up and start out before dawn in the wee hours. I figure I can be home and out at the BOL I by the end of the fourth day. Afterwards, the bikes will come in handy for OP / FOR guard changes or LRRP operations. Any thoughts or ideas?
Bikes are greatly underrated and ignored as transportation in the US -- unlike nearly the entire rest of the world.

I don't know what "at my age" means for walking or biking - because people vary greatly in their ability and willingness to do either - but I will mention that cycling is a skill -- and the notion that once you learn you never forget is really nonsense. Cycling is perishable both as a skill and as an ability; both aspects require frequent practice.

Another factor is that the bike needs to be properly fitted to you (NOT vice versa!), properly adjusted, and well maintained. It is possible that you found a great bike on Craig's List, that you made sure it fitted you well, and that you have inspected, adjusted, and maintained the bike thoroughly since buying it -- but statistically I would doubt all of those things.

A good BO/GH bike does not need to cost a thousand dollars, you actually CAN find one on Craig's List or at WallyWorld, although the selection is certainly better at a decent bike shop.

Depending on the terrain, a "cruiser" may be a better choice than an "mountain bike" - and a hybrid might be better that either. One thing I would highly recommend would be choosing a bike with disk brakes instead of rim brakes. Disk brakes used to be rare on entry level bikes, but they are becoming more common. The biggest advantage is that disk brakes work even when wet (albeit not quite as well) but traditional rim brakes are nearly useless when wet -- plus the rim brakes will get wet simply from passing through a puddle while disk brakes generally only get wet in significant rain (or trying to cross a stream more than a foot deep).

Lighter weight is touted as a great benefit of more expensive bikes -- but lighter weight is not likely to be much of a benefit to you unless your situation is almost entirely on pavement and requires a lot of uphill climbing or carrying your bike over obstacles.
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Old 02-19-2017, 03:44 PM
Jamais Arriere Jamais Arriere is offline
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I could see you being vulnerable later on but immediately after whatever incident occurs you should have time. Two weeks walking gets you into the period which might not be safe. With a bike you could make it home in a couple days. If nothing else a bike can be pushed with a large quantity of you preps. One suggestion I do make is buy another bike and get used to riding longer and longer distances.
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Old 02-19-2017, 04:23 PM
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There's some mixing of terms, here.

On a bike you're vulnerable all the time, any time, emergency or not. You might not be a target at any given time, but you're vulnerable all the time. When you become a target, you will be just as vulnerable as when you weren't. So getting that straight might help clarify some thinking.

Assuming everyone will be good, play nice, and leave you alone is all fine and good. Makes a guy wonder why you'd own a gun, you know, like the rest of the world and not the US. But this assumption can be in grievous error. If that's the risk you'd like to take, then that's fine with me.

And I wonder where this place is that all the bad things will happen "later on"? I wonder where this is that you'll have plenty of time? Because there's plenty of places right now, with no pressing emergency, that you'd be in peril to ride your bike, especially at night, but somehow things will get *better* if there's an emergency?

Biking and thoughts of biking bring out the childhood thinking in us all. This close to spring, especially, biking is a good thought. But realistically, there are undeniable vulnerabilities and risks. You're not just depending on your equipment, you're depending on everyone else to leave you completely alone when they, too, need your wheels. That seems like a lot to assume, IMO.


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Old 02-19-2017, 05:00 PM
Yosemite Bob Yosemite Bob is offline
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I don't mean to be the only guy here to actively rain on you, but if you're in a situation having to rely on a bike to get home, then you just need to stay put. I'm all for you riding your bike for exercise and recreation, but no one should seriously consider it as their method to get home should SHTF. It might be a different story if you were going a mile or three through a set of nice neighborhoods, but the distance you're talking about is ridiculous and - no disrespect - an example of comic-book happy ending thinking. Frankly, I think you'd probably be about as safe hitch-hiking, but then you'd at least see who was approaching and have your hands free.

Seriously, no disrespect, but you assume you'd be able to outrun potential problems, and that no one would target you. You may think you will only have to avoid desperate people, but you'll most assuredly be trying to avoid armed *******s with cars who will target you just because they can. When laws break down you'll experience the same focus that commercial buildings do when asshats know cops won't stop them.

Your scenario will work for zombies, but not against people. If you don't think your car will get you home when SHTF, get a better car. Not hating on you, but prepping has to be realistic toward what you WILL face.
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Old 02-19-2017, 05:07 PM
Jamais Arriere Jamais Arriere is offline
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What I meant is you might not be as vulnerable in the bringing stages of an event. Some people just have to get home. Me I'm happy where I am I do not plan on going anywhere. I do have plan B,C,D etc. The bicycle is just an option for people to use.
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Old 02-19-2017, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Jamais Arriere View Post
I could see you being vulnerable later on but immediately after whatever incident occurs you should have time. Two weeks walking gets you into the period which might not be safe. With a bike you could make it home in a couple days. If nothing else a bike can be pushed with a large quantity of you preps. One suggestion I do make is buy another bike and get used to riding longer and longer distances.
I agree, the first couple days I anticipate many people standing around picking their nose and wondering what happened. After a couple of days when they run out of food and toilet paper the reality and desparation will set in and begin to turn average men evil.

While riding a bicycle makes you vulnerable it also has some advantages. Think of your interaction with dogs. When Walking a dog can sense you coming with plenty of time to approach/attack. If you encounter a dog up close while walking you can't out run it to get away. Riding a bike the dog is often still on the porch before he realizes you have entered his territory. If the dog starts running at you you can speed up and lose him on a bike. Walking or riding you will still need situational awareness.

The OP's plan with a used Craiglist mountain bike is fraught with other problems but not the concerns dyingslower has expressed. For the OP there is a huge learning curve on cycling that distance unladen before you even start loading up with gear.
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Old 02-19-2017, 05:19 PM
Sberk1 Sberk1 is offline
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Default Consider a small motorcycle

Consider a small motorcycle. Look at Kawasaki Z125, or Honda Grom
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Old 02-19-2017, 07:44 PM
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"Police bikes" are no better than anything you can buy at a halfway decent bike shop. Police depts actually get screwed by bike shops because they charge dept more money....only cuz it says police on it! I have worked in LE for years and have friends who work at bike shops.
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Old 02-19-2017, 08:11 PM
Yosemite Bob Yosemite Bob is offline
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Consider a small motorcycle. Look at Kawasaki Z125, or Honda Grom
Why did no one else think of this? Much better idea than a bike.
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Old 02-19-2017, 11:07 PM
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Biking and thoughts of biking bring out the childhood thinking in us all.
And apparently YOUR childhood consisted of getting bullied and beaten up -- as well as constantly falling off your bicycle before one of the bullies took it from you.

You jabber on and on about cyclists being "vulnerable" but you clearly know nothing at all about cycling other than your own bad experiences as the neighborhood patsy. Most importantly, you contribute NOTHING to this discussion other than your constant harping that cycling is somehow more dangerous than walking.

You completely ignore the FACT that cycling is faster and allows covering a much greater distance between stops -- thus significantly reducing vulnerability.

You also ignore the FACT that cycling allows carrying loads that would be impossible or at least impractical if walking.

Yes, a car has advantages -- it provide SOME protection both from the elements and from casual dismounted attackers -- a car is faster than a bicycle IF the roads are clear and open -- and a car can cover even greater distances IF fuel is available.

BUT when the alternatives are 1) Staying put at a bad location, or 2) Walking, or 3) Cycling -- there are very few circumstances where 1 or 2 is a better choice than 3.

While we are all sorry for your childhood trauma having the big bad bully knock you down and take your bike, it is time to get over that and move on.
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