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Old 05-19-2011, 04:00 PM
surviva surviva is offline
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Old 06-19-2011, 05:05 AM
ghostmedic68 ghostmedic68 is offline
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Default Book recommendation

Does anyone know of a small book, or field guide I stow in m BOB for edible plants? Preferably something that is indexed by region? Because if I don't know what the plant is, how am I going to search for it in a book, ya know? It would take forever. But if I at least know where I'm at, I can look for what's common in the area and narrow it down a bit. I plan on being all over the place so books with common plants from around the world would be best. Any suggestions would be helpful though. Thanks!
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Old 06-19-2011, 03:06 PM
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Smile pocket guide

check out this link gm...
http://www.survivaltopics.com/forums...et-guides.html
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Old 09-09-2011, 02:53 PM
2kanzam 2kanzam is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klax View Post
Any info about edible plants in Ohio/appalachia would help a lot. I live in Ohio and I know a few wild plants I can eat but not enough to really count. Here's a list of the things I know you can eat:

So yea if anyone has any links or anything on plants in my area that I can eat, please message me and let me know, because that's info. I'd really like to have.

I realize this post was a long time ago, but thought I'd let you all know the wild edibles I commonly see and eat while exploring the woods of appalachia

Greens:
-Dandelion
-Plantains (not the banana type thing)
-fiddle fern
-Wild Mustard
-Purslane
-Nettles (got to blanch stinging nettle!)
-Ramps
-Wild Onion

Fruits/berries:
-Blackberries
-Raspberries
-Blueberries
-Huckleberries
-Service berries
-Paw Paw
-Apples
-Yew berry (JUST the fleshy part of the fruit!!!) but not really a wild plant here
-Prickly pear (fruit and meat)

Mushrooms:
-Morels
-Chicken of the woods
-I call it "Turkey Tail" mushroom...flat dry mushroom often found on trees

Carbs:
-Acorns (need leached)
-cattails
-Birch/ sugar Maple syrup
-Rhubarb, but usually only find it at old homesteads
-Milk weed

Teas:
-Sassafras
-Black birch twigs/twig bark
-Pine needles
-Rose hips (or just eat the middle...alot of vit C)


I'm sure there's more just can't think of them...
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Old 10-08-2011, 02:04 PM
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an edible plant in North America is topinambur, or Jerusalem artichoke.
here's a useful thing about it:
http://topinamburplant.com/
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Old 10-13-2011, 12:36 PM
lulusparrow lulusparrow is offline
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I've always been fascinated with food foraging. The thought of being able to know what to eat and be able to feed my girls if we ever had to make a run for it!! Does anyone have a food list for Arizona? Specifically Tucson?
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Old 10-31-2011, 04:32 PM
unrulymaiden unrulymaiden is offline
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Wow! wondering if cat tail flour has made it's way into this area of the forum?
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Old 10-31-2011, 10:16 PM
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To Deadeye 351--yes daylily buds and blossoms are edible. Rather tasteless but better than many leaves/plantains etc which get bitter after early spring. I've put daylilies in salads. Thanks, Wildartist
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Old 10-31-2011, 10:38 PM
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To Klax who 'tried to eat dandelion once but it tasted foul": Dandelion, like many other 'edible' plants is nice (like endive) when young and tender in the spring. By summer it is rank and bitter. Maybe you can eat it if you are very hungry, boiling it in several changes of water.

Living on wild plants takes a lot of experience and courage...I think as survivalists we should eat them often to see if we can stomach what grows in our area--not wait until we need to rely on it and find we don't know much about it. Wild plants are going to be tough and bitter a lot of the time. But I guess if it means starvation we'll eat it.

I've tried white oak acorns, boiling them about three times (peeled) with a pinch of baking soda to counteract the bitterness. Tasted like beans. I know you can grind them for flour but never tried it. They are the least bitter of acorns.

I have eaten poke since childhood, boiled, when young in the spring. The shoots came from poor sandy soil so I think they had less of the toxicity which might occur in richer soil. Then when an adult I read from the DofA that I should NEVER eat pokeweed since it causes spasms, paralysis and sometimes death. So, yes many of the 'edible' plants can be toxic, in some places and at some times of year.

I now live in OK so need to learn what we have here. Grew up in NJ when it was still rural and learned a lot about plants there. Also lived in Alaska and was just starting to learn about their plants. Then Idaho... Dandelion is just about everywhere so it's something to watch for if you are on the run. I hope to learn more from this forum. Thanks, guys.
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Old 11-19-2011, 08:25 PM
Zuma Zuma is offline
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This is a great list. I am sure there are many more that could go on it, what we need is one that goes by region and time of year. I have heard that some plants are OK at some stages of their growth and not OK at other stages.
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Old 11-20-2011, 09:26 PM
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just Ordered Florida's Incredible Wild Edibles
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Old 12-20-2011, 05:58 AM
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For those of you interested in the way things "used to be done" and within they touch on edible and medicinal plants then you should check out the "Foxfire" books.

I first read these nearly 30 years ago as a pre-teen. I dug "roots" as a boy during the summer when not bailing hay/working in tobacco in order to make a few dollars, these books were helpful in me identify nearly all local (Appalachian) region plants. I likewise had an 80 year old grandfather at the time that not only was a hell-fire and brimstone southern baptist (minus the snakes), but likewise he was what would be considered a "medicine" man that knew all the natural remedies for different ailments (mainly consisting of local plants). Sugar took his eye sight and in between me reading him passages of the bible he'd pass along different remedies and uses of plants. He'd also let me steal a chew of tobacco (His daughter (my mother) was never that happy about that!). He passed away at the age of 87 and I still hate the fact that I was preoccupied with girls at that age and didn't take the time to learn as much as I could form him.

The foxfire series of books are very useful for those of us seeking the know-how for living a simpler life (Even I need to get back to that). I am retired at age 41 and have a wife that is an upper level executive in the health care field. We have 3 young children and I spend my time trying to teach them to hunt, fish, fend for themselves and am attempting to show them some about self-sufficiency and the foxfire series will be on our (their) reading list.

Oldhat
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Old 12-24-2011, 01:27 AM
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We have quiet a variety of wild edibles in Alaska.
The book, Alaska's Wild Plants, a guide to Alaska's edibles harvest is a good base for anyone in the Pacific Northwest.
Many plants, such as dandelions, wild berries, seas weeds, etc, are found all over the USA.
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Old 12-26-2011, 11:37 AM
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Default Info for foragers

There is a great site I found a while back that can be of benefit. (especially to those living in the Northwest). It is at nothernbushcraft.com. I hope it helps some of you.

http://www.northernbushcraft.com/plants/index.htm
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Old 12-30-2011, 09:57 PM
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Thank you to all who posted here! I did not know that the prickly pear was the name of the plant that produces tunas! I love tunas, and had no idea the pads were edible too!.
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Old 12-30-2011, 10:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuffhorse View Post
Indians would watch their horses. If the horse eats it, people can too.
You know, you can't really go by that, because horses will eat poison plants. And, besides that, there's alot of plants poison to horses that aren't to humans, and vise-versa.
Here's an example:

http://www.understanding-horse-nutri...us-plants.html

p.s. I'm not trying to be rude by the way. Just pointing out that maybe thats not a good indicator of choosing plants to eat. Like birds can eat berries that kill sicken us, or kill us.
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Old 01-02-2012, 11:46 PM
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Very interesting topic everyone... A few suggestions for colder climates -

* I believe you need to parboil (as in boil, dump the water, and boil again) pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) shoots in the spring to eat safely. I've never tried it and won't unless I'm desperate. However, the berries produce a dark stain that works as an good ink.

* Dandelions taste best in the spring before it blossoms - not as bitter. Same with a lot of plants. Plus its loaded in nutrients and great for the liver.

* Plaintain is good too and very common in lawns. It also makes a good healing poultice.

* A very common invasive exotic (at least here in MI) is Autumn Olive/Russian Olive (Elaegnus umbellata), which is edible and extremely high in lycopene ( a compound that is believed to reduce the risk of certain cancers, especially prostate). I make jam out of the berries and have been every fall for years. Pros - unlike a lot of nutrients, lycopene is a pigment, so it does not break down with heat. Also, the berries ripen very late in the season around late Sept to mid Oct, meaning you have a source of fresh fruit after the end of the growing season. Cons - it has some mighty mean thorns and the seeds make up about half the berry, making it more time-consuming and wasteful to get the juice. Plus, you're doing the environment a favor by reducing the seeds being moved by birds, as a single bush can produce 10,000 viable seeds. So be sure to burn the seeds after you seive them. Don't worry, its unlikely overharvesting will ever be an issue with this one. You'll also want to sweeten them if possible; they're a little tart to eat alone.

*Rosehips are a really good source of Vit. C. Preventing scurvy in a northern climate can be tricky if you don't know where to look.

* Watercress is a good source of lots of nutrients, if you can find it in a shallow, running stream. The catch with it is that if the water is contaminated at all, the watercress will be too.

* If you start getting even further up north, Reindeer moss (actually a lichen) is edible, often where there's little else around for forage.

* Also, I'm new to this forum, so I'm not sure if there are other threads on plant sharing/trading or even if it is acceptable, but I have a few starts from my Opuntia (prickly pear) suited for zone 5 (freezing winters). Very little upkeep needed, just don't step on them barefoot ;-)

* Take some time to learn poisonous plants like Water Hemlock, nightshade (solonaceae).Warning, W. Hemlock is very similar to Queen Annes Lace (Daucus carota), which is edible, but not particularly valuable nutritionally. When in doubt, don't eat it.

* BTW - disclaimer - if you decide to try any of these at home, please don't blame me. Consume at your own risk. Also, if you don't know if you're allergic to something or not, just test a teeny-tiny amount - no reaction, you might try more. Be smart about it - everything in moderation.

*** One more thing, the best ID guides in the world won't help you if you can't use them. A good book, like Peterson's will include a dichotomous key in the back, to help you positively ID your plant. Keying out a plant can be tricky at first, but once you get the hang of it, you'll be glad you took the time to learn.

Happy, safe foraging all!
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Old 01-14-2012, 08:05 AM
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Has anyone here tried pine needle tea? It's loaded with Vitamin C and really doesn't takes all that bad. I put some in tang about a week ago and it tasted pretty good.

If anyone does know the story, some early pioneers were dying of typhoid and the American Indians recongnized the symphtoms and showed them how to make it. It saved their lives.
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Old 01-22-2012, 11:56 PM
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This is my first time to this site and would like to say that I am wanting to learn as much as I possibly can.
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Old 01-23-2012, 01:11 PM
the3foragers the3foragers is offline
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Hello Everyone
Can we post a link here for a blog or website about foraging?
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