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Old 03-03-2013, 02:17 PM
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Question Update! What are these missouri plants? (March 3 2013)



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It has been a while since I have been studying survival skills so recently i have gotten back into it. I went to a spot of woods where i usually put my bushcraft skills to the test and decided to look for what kind of plants there might be in the winter. there was only one tree that was green throughout all the leafless trees. there was some small weeds as well. unfortunately i did not have my camera with me at the time o i brought back samples of what i found but have no idea what they are. can you i.d. any? the temperatures right now range from 15F and 35F.

Heres all of them together



1.)
This one was the only green tree within the area i found. it is about 7 feet all he one i found. has smooth bark that has a grayish color. the thickest part was probably 1.5in. - 2in. in diameter




2.)
This one was a small weed or grass. This is the whole plant here minus some roots that did not come out. it has a flower in the middle that stands about an inch above the leaves




3.)
I coudnt tell if this one was a series of vines or a tree in itself. it went along a long ways on the edge of the forest where it opens to open grass.



4.)
This one looked to be a small shrub. it had little twig branches and was about 3 inches tall. there are 45 cuts in the twigs where rabbits have eaten it so it may be taller. the leaves has thin fuzz on them




5.)
Heres on i found by a small pond. it has very broad leaves that are lightly hairy



6.)
heres one more i found around a small pond. they were in low lying pathes.

Last edited by Dodge631; 03-04-2013 at 07:53 PM.. Reason: Update photos
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Old 03-03-2013, 04:10 PM
edibleplantguy edibleplantguy is offline
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Default Some possible names

Greetings All,

The top single-plant shot appears to be American holly, Ilex opaca. If it is a female it will probably still have some of last year's berries on the branches. Nothing edible I know of for this species. Some native holly has been used for tea (because of the caffeine content) but this not often.

The second featured plant I believe is hairy bittercress, Cardamine hirsuta. This mustard can become a common weed, but it is one of my favorites in salad. There is very little hair on a hairy bittercress; they are a succulent green that can be cooked or enjoyed raw in sandwiches or salads.

I think there is a good chance that the third plant is a Japanese honeysuckle, Lonicera japonica. This is a first rate invasive ecological disaster. As far as food goes this is not much of a resource. Some say eating boiled leaves is ok, but that is not well documented advice. Black berries are terrible and maybe mildly toxic, but it's a lot of work to choke them down and for no good reason.

The fourth plant I would need to see some more of to be helpful.

Thanks for reading.

edibleplantguy
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Old 03-03-2013, 05:29 PM
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thanks. ill try to get the whole thing in the picture when i go back out. ill bring my camera
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Old 03-03-2013, 10:01 PM
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I concur on the hairy bittercress, and he's right it is more appetising than it sounds.
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Old 03-04-2013, 07:57 PM
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update! new pictures added and a few new ones i did not notice last time i was out
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Old 03-04-2013, 09:07 PM
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I have one of the plants in picture 1 in the woods by my house... give this a look and see if this is closer to what you came across. http://www.carolinanature.com/trees/bebe.html

Pic 3 looks like common honeysuckle, but can't be sure.

Pic 5 looks kinda like mullien.
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Old 03-04-2013, 09:34 PM
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its close but the bark is different and the leaves are a bit too. i think its American holley
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Old 03-05-2013, 10:31 AM
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The last one looks like jack by the hedge but I'm not sure. One before could be comfrey but the photo isn't great.
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Old 03-05-2013, 10:35 AM
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Actually looking again at the last one the stems are dark and the leaf shape suggests possibly a member of the Lamiaceae family. Try rubbing it between your fingers, jack by the hedge has a mild garlic smell other herbs such as the mints etc with have their own smells it helps with identification
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Old 03-05-2013, 02:53 PM
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Greetings Dodge631,

I believe we have the following:

1.) As in my first note; American holly, Ilex opaca.

2.) Also as above; Hairy bittercress, Cardamine hirsuta.

3.) Also as above. Japanese honeysuckle, Lonicera japonica, is a 'scrambling-climbing' vine. In the states of Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia, not to mention others, this species attains the status of plague invasive species. Covering everything in some areas so densely it becomes a monoculture, up to about 12 feet.

4.) Your improved shot of the small bush appears to imply it is a foreign honeysuckle, probably Tartar's honeysuckle, Lonicera tartarica, but there are others and some hybrids as well. The berries vary from terrible to mildly toxic, although some folks make jam from Tartar's honeysuckle. Another important woody invasive, from Eurasia in this case.

5.) This plant is velvet mullein, Verbascum thapsis. It is soft with trichomes, but can make terrible toilet paper if the fuzz comes off, it is like fiberglass (not your best call for the rectal mucosa). This second year plant will send up a mostly unbranched flower stalk, between 2 and 8 feet tall that will bear 1" diameter yellows that are usually closed by 10:00AM or so. When this stalk dies (this species is biennial) the dead stalk, when dried by October, makes an excellent-bow-and drill fire spindle.

6.) This is a European mint family plant called purple dead-nettle, Lamium purpureum (the final clue is the flowers next to the Setaria grass in the upper right corner). It can be eaten in several ways, numerous blogs have recipes.

Thanks for showing us your plants, and thank you for reading.

edibleplantguy
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Old 03-05-2013, 04:15 PM
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thanks guys. now i know a little more about my little bushcraft location. good to know there is an edible one there too. any tips of procuring and preparing any of these plants?
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