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Old 03-13-2012, 08:42 PM
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Post your story here and maybe somebody will learn a thing or two and help themselves survive someday!

My story, shortened so not to bore you .

I was in the Marine Corps doing desert training at 29 Palms. I can't remember what year it was but it was between 2000-2002. Me and the guys were hanging out in the sand at around midnight drinking some beers. I am sitting on a beer cooler and just enjoying some down time and the cool temperature of the night. I hear a very low, faint rumble that I didn't pay any attention to and figured it was just one of the tanks that were parked nearby. Well the rumble grew louder over the next maybe 20 seconds. Then I notice the power lines pretty nearby start swinging back and forth. At this point I stand up and by the time I get to my feet I can barely stand and I'm all over the place still trying to figure out what the hell is going on. At that point someone yelled "earthquake" and I finally realized what the hell was going on. We rode it out until it finally quit shaking. I wasn't afraid at all, I was trying to take it all in and actually enjoyed feeling the power of the earth beneath me, it was awesome to say the least. A couple guys were scared to death though, one even crying I remember. We were safe where we were since the tallest buildings were aluminum "D" shaped huts 10 feet high. A group of us jumped in the shuttle van that we had and busted butt over to the flightline to check on our helicopters. We always chain them down at the 3 points where the wheels are and they had still moved about 6 feet from their spots!! Amazing!

Turned out the quake was centered a mere 15 miles from us and was a 7.1 on the richter scale, a HUGE quake! We had aftershocks for the next few days, some fairly large.

Now I live in the Pacific Northwest which as some of you probably know a prime target for a very large earthquake in the near future. According to scientists we are overdue for the next event. With this in mind always I keep my senses on point for that low rumble and actually train myself anytime I hear something that reminds me of it and start looking around for the nearest exit to the building or the nearest place I can take cover. I live in a two story condo with a neighbor upstairs. Just a few minutes before I started typing this story he started his clothes dryer. I was directly beneath it in my bathroom so I could hear a low rumble and stopped everything I was doing and listened intently. Thankfully it was his dryer but I am always on point and staying alert!
Stay alert, stay alive!
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Old 03-15-2012, 04:33 AM
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Only one I was ever in I actually avoided. Back in 1996 the city I was in saw a freak winter snow storm that collapsed buildings, shut down roads, prevented food getting in, etc.

Really, REALLY bad. Lives were lost.

The day it started to snow, I watched the first flakes fall as my plane took off to take me hundreds of miles away.

By the time I got back, several weeks later, there was barely even any significant snow on the ground as far as I was concerned. If not for having watched the news, I never would have known how bad it had got...

Ironically, with all my prep, I avoided the closest I ever came by a few hours. Just a few hours after I left, planes could not take off.
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Old 03-15-2012, 06:31 AM
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Cyclone Ului and Yasi.

It was windy
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Old 03-15-2012, 09:05 PM
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Default Earthquakes....Wild Fires....Structure Fires...Car Wrecks...Etc.

There always seems to be short period of time, (which varies...depending upon the circumstances) where you literally don't believe what you are experiencing. This can be only a few seconds, or sometimes up to several minutes or even hours. Shock.

Then your brain "clicks" and you go into that needed particular mode of survival thinking. This is probably an inherited survival trait, but lots of times it can get you into serious trouble. With experience or repetitive training you can reduce that time. HB of CJ (old coot)
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Old 03-15-2012, 09:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dontbuypotteryfromme View Post
Cyclone Ului and Yasi.

It was windy
Gotta love a person of few words.
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Old 03-15-2012, 09:20 PM
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About 8 years ago, IIRC, we had a big windstorm come down the valley in the dead of winter. The winds were strong enough to rip the sensor off of the top of the gov. windvane at a last registered speed of 168 mph. We're right on the Columbia river, two big hydroelectric dams within 10 miles of me, we NEVER lose power, like never.

Subfreezing temperatures were normal during the daytime and those who didn't have an alternate method to heat their homes had it pretty rough, had a couple that asphyxiated themselves by trying to heat there home with a bbq, had a few more that froze to death.

I moved into my camper, I had plenty to eat, hot showers, oven, stovetop, HEAT, all the luxuries of home, even hooked up the cable and internet.

It must have sucked to be one of those folks that had no alternative but to stay in their homes with no heat.......
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Old 03-15-2012, 09:28 PM
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LOL-I live in Louisiana and Texas---I've lived through 5 tornadoes, 2 hurricanes, several shootouts, 4 car wrecks, and 3 motorcycle wrecks.....Don't know how I survived it all other than just trying to keep 1 step ahead of what's coming.
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Old 03-15-2012, 09:34 PM
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Blizzard of 1967: it was so bad they pulled all the snow plows. We lived on a state highway and it was 3 days before you could even tell there was a road there. The day before it hit it was in the 60s with tornado warnings.

Flood of 1996: a low pressure stalled over northern Illinois. In Aurora 17 inches of rain fell in less than 24 hours. Places that have never before or since flooded were several feet under water.

Ice storm of 2009: I was working in Kentucky at the time. Took me hours to get home up Interstate 24. I was going 20 miles an hour and passing semis. It was too nasty to go any faster and too hazardous to stop on the side of the road (someone might slide into you) so all we could all do was just keep moving slowly forward. We were without power for 10 days. Some people didn't get it back for a month.

Natural disasters? Or just the weather?
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Old 03-15-2012, 11:15 PM
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I have traveled a lot for over 40 years and in that time I have seen too many near misses. All I will say is that you prep to give your family and yourself the best chance of surviving in tough times. It is not a guarantee of survival it is just a way of giving you the tools to survive. Learning as much as you can is your first line of defense.
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Old 03-16-2012, 01:02 AM
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We have a flood warning going at the moment. Nothing yet though.
http://www.abc.net.au/northqld/weather/warnings.htm
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Old 03-16-2012, 02:12 PM
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When I first moved to the PRK, I had known that earthquakes were a possiblility, so the first thing I did was built 2, 4X8 plywood boxes and set them out on my back patio.This was in early '89. I put a small tent, canned goods (Meat/veg/fruit), pool shock, couple packages of Bic lighters, camp stove, charcoal briquettes, channel locks, aspirins, Jack Daniels, sleeping bags, flashlights and batteries, 200 rounds of 7.62 NATO for my rifle that was in the house, a .32cal Derrenger and fifty rounds for it. Also, other misc. items I don't remember.

Good thing too. Several months later, we had the Loma Prieta earthquake. It was bad! When it was over, everything in my house was on the floor except for my fishtank and TV strangely enough. I smelled gas so I went to my box, retrieved my channel locks and went around the neighborhood shutting off gas lines as I checked on my neighbors. Minor injuries, mostly small cuts, scratches and bruises. I pitched a tent in the back yard for the next two days until the aftershocks were over, then went into the house to clean up. Not too bad really, could've been much worse. We lived out of that "earthquake box" for 12 days, due to no water, or power. It wasn't bad. I learned alot. I learned some things that definately made me a better prepper.

SANITATION: I had a post hole digger and shovel. I also had one of those little portable toilet seats. But this was only for a week.

There was no looting. Everyone else was too busy cleaning their own abodes to bother anyone thankfully. Didn't see a single cop in the area for two full weeks. I had water stored next to the boxes, around 100 gallons. We drank all we wanted, but used it sparingly for everything else. I had paper plates, cups and plastic sporks in the box also. Used the used dishes to start a pit fire every night, but just a small one. Cooking was done on the camp stove, and marshmallows and canned hot dogs were roasted on a stick over the fire.
The sporks were washed and re-used. We took sparing, sponge baths for the first week as the water was off. The power was off for five more days where we were.

Actually, I had water and food to spare when it was all over with. In actuality, it went pretty well, and was fun in a way. It was like camping for two weeks.Not bad at all...... But it was only for two weeks.
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Old 03-16-2012, 11:06 PM
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When I was in the Marine Corps (same time frame as you) we were in the hangar just getting ready to be released for the day when all the tool boxes on the shelves started to shake and fall off. Everyone just looked at each other and didn't know what to do. Then finally Gunny says "get outside". No damage done.

In Iraq we were in the maintenance tent and a camel spider came in and headed right for me. People freaked out and were standing on chairs and ****. As for me I ran off. Give me the Republican Guard all you want, but keep them dam things away from me.


A more serious one were the numerous hurricanes I went through in NY. Especially hurricane Gloria. Basic preps will save your life. Food for a week. Water for a week. At the minimum.


Oh and then there was the worst sandstorm ever in Iraq. Back in 2003. That crap was just terrible. Luckily for me I just had to deal with the 60 mile per hour winds, blinding sand and deafening howl. My good friend had all that and Iraqi armor bearing down on him. Advice. Assuming no enemy armor is present, hunker down, don't try to wander off, wear goggles and something to cover your face and have water with you.



Been through some bad winter storms in NY as well as Colorado. Again basic preps of food and water will save a life. Some way to keep warm as well in a winter storm.
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Old 03-17-2012, 02:15 AM
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Hurricanes, tornado, floods.

My advice with hurricanes is that you need to board up your windows not just tape them unless you live where there are no trees or other flying debris. During all the hurricanes, I could hear stuff hitting the sides of the house and the plywood I had put over the windows. Immature green pinecones and branches can become powerful projectiles when propelled by 130 and 140 mph gusts. Windows would have been completly smashed out all the way around the house. If you're in the eye, don't wander off too far when the calm passes over. And don't assume the winds will be less violent when coming from the opposite direction after the eye passes. What trees didn't come down with winds from the northeast often will come down in winds from the southwest, after being weakened.

Stay prepared at all times of year. Not just for natural disasters but for illness, injury, periods of no income, and in the event you have to take in a relative or friend for a while.
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Old 03-17-2012, 05:54 AM
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growing up in the hurricane alley (Florida panhandle), I have been through about 6 of them, 2 were direct hits. Some leaving us without power for up to 3 weeks.
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Old 03-17-2012, 06:19 AM
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ivan, katrina, every other big assed hurricane that hit the gulf coast since the mid '80s. add in a few texas twisters and a hell of an ice storm in l wood circa jan of 07 and ive seen some damage done. after seeing them both tho, ivan was worse than katrina. katrina only got more coverage due to where it hit and all the "boo hoo pity me, gimme money" afterwards.
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Old 03-17-2012, 02:19 PM
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The house took a direct hit from a tornado back in the late 80s. Demolished half of the second floor and completely destroyed the neighbors house 1/4 mile away from us. His roof was completely lifted off the house and deposited in the woods next to our house. The power of a tornado is unimaginable. Nobody was hurt. In tornado alley you know not to mess around. Everybody heads to the basement and that's where we rode it out.

The great thing about a small rural town - we had people helping out and making the house water tight within an hour. Re-construction took several months.
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Old 03-18-2012, 02:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irishmike357 View Post
When I was in the Marine Corps (same time frame as you) we were in the hangar just getting ready to be released for the day when all the tool boxes on the shelves started to shake and fall off. Everyone just looked at each other and didn't know what to do. Then finally Gunny says "get outside". No damage done.

In Iraq we were in the maintenance tent and a camel spider came in and headed right for me. People freaked out and were standing on chairs and ****. As for me I ran off. Give me the Republican Guard all you want, but keep them dam things away from me.


A more serious one were the numerous hurricanes I went through in NY. Especially hurricane Gloria. Basic preps will save your life. Food for a week. Water for a week. At the minimum.


Oh and then there was the worst sandstorm ever in Iraq. Back in 2003. That crap was just terrible. Luckily for me I just had to deal with the 60 mile per hour winds, blinding sand and deafening howl. My good friend had all that and Iraqi armor bearing down on him. Advice. Assuming no enemy armor is present, hunker down, don't try to wander off, wear goggles and something to cover your face and have water with you.



Been through some bad winter storms in NY as well as Colorado. Again basic preps of food and water will save a life. Some way to keep warm as well in a winter storm.
Yeah camel spiders are straight from the devil!
I rode this sandstorm out from inside one of our birds. Unreal that sand can just blow in out of nowhere like a blizzard!

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Old 03-18-2012, 02:13 AM
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Typhoon "Paka"

Can not remember what year it was. Might have been 97 or 98. I was stationed at Andersen AFB, Guam back then and we got nailed with a cat 5. Sustained winds over 200 mph. We had limited power for 38 days. And the cleanup was an absolute nitemare.

If memory serves were were locked down for 3 days.

Multiple tornadoes when I was a kid growing up in Kansas. Had two go right between our house and barn. Didn't even pull a shingle off the roof. Very fortunate that time.
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Old 03-18-2012, 11:06 AM
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I consider myself lucky because, although I've been through many hairy situations, I never really faced any life threatening disasters first hand.

That being said, I must share this SHTF scenario that can happen to anyone and at any time and this is essentially why I prepare...

This event was a petroleum pipeline explosion that occurred around midnight, on a weeknight, not far from my former home. Again, I was fortunate enough to not be directly impacted by the explosion, but there were many who suffered and one person lost her life.

There was absolutely no warning and the people affected were not at all "prepared". Many were blown from their beds and forced to flee with whatever they had on their backs - in other words, what they wore to bed that night. And, it was still winter with snow on the ground.

Friends and family who lived in the immediate area were, in some cases, taking in literally naked strangers into their homes because, again, these people were forced to flee without any notice and only with the clothes on their backs.

Now try to imagine running through the woods (and swamps) barefoot and wearing nothing but P.J's in sub-freezing, snowy weather.

The flame was described as turning night into day and the gawkers soon followed - like bugs to a porch light - clogging up all the major roads for miles around. If not for well trained responders and a lot of "dumb luck" things could have been much worse.

This was the Durham Woods pipeline explosion that occurred on March 23, 1994. It was because of this event, the government established the "one call" system.

Sadly, there are many events similar to this that still happen on a regular basis. And yet, the sheeple still choose to ignore these and other dangers that could be lurking in their own backyards.

Edited to add this video -
<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/NyMbaZ9FVjA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

If it doesn't work, here's the link...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NyMbaZ9FVjA
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Old 03-18-2012, 01:21 PM
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Wow those sandstorms and earthquake stories seem intense
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