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Old 05-03-2019, 09:22 AM
InOmaha InOmaha is offline
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I forgot about different DIY trapping methods. We used 5 gallon buckets with water and small dowels and sticks in the chicken house.

You can buy steel rollers now. Roller trap

Or play pirate and make them walk the plank. Walk the plank trap

Use deeper slick buckets if you don't like the idea of drowning them.
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Old 05-03-2019, 10:45 AM
Random_Signal Random_Signal is offline
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Hunting is a learned skill.
Chosing a pet to be a mouser is like hiring a human helper. Not every individual is going to have the skills you need.

Cats, for example, are born with the instinct to pounce and pursue, but the skills to become an effective hunter must be learned--generally taught by the mother. I have had many cats over the years, and some were awesome hunters while others were totally inept.
Mostly kittens taken from their mother before they were 3 months (12 weeks) old are pretty clueless. They need that training. Of course, it helps if the mother is a skilled huntress and a good teacher. I once watched a cat line her kittens up in a row, demonstrate a move, and then each kitten in turn tried the same move and the mother corrected them. It was like watching a martial arts class! I had another cat who took down jack rabbits larger than she was. I also have a cat who once jumped out of the way when a mouse ran towards him. I could imagine him saying "eek!" Hunting is definitely more than instinct.

It's also good to remember that, contrary to popular myth, domestic and feral cats are social animals--more like lions than pumas. They will hunt cooperatively. I've even seen three cats and a large dog working together to flush out and corner prey.

Your best bet would be to find someone who has a mom-cat who is a good mouser and adopt a couple of her kittens--being sure they stay with her long enough to get training. Also, cats who are indoor pets with access to the outdoors will patrol both the house and grounds, and if they bond with you they will have more stake in guarding "their" territory. Cats who are allowed to develop a social structure are intensely loyal to their "clan" (including "their" humans) but mostly indifferent to everyone else.

Last edited by Random_Signal; 05-03-2019 at 10:48 AM.. Reason: mis-spelling
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Old 05-03-2019, 11:14 AM
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Is there such a thing as a small electric fence? A wire maybe 5-10 feet long to prevent rat access.
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Old 05-04-2019, 12:35 AM
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I have a small female cat who frequently brings home medium sized rodents . She thinks she is bringing home gifts and I am long past punishing her. It is in her nature and she is good at it. Sometimes at night if I walk outside she darts at my feet from yards away.

She was pretty young when we picked her up from the shelter. I don't know where she got her skills but she likes to be outside 50% of the time and if locked inside she will bounce off walls trying to get out.


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Old 05-04-2019, 12:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry The Cat View Post
I had a feral kitten show up at my place a couple of years ago. We felt sorry for her and fed her on the front porch, so she stuck around. Our old inside/outside female cat got along with her OK, and one day we watched something kind of interesting. The old cat caught a mouse, and brought it, alive, onto the front porch. She dropped it in front of the young cat, let it run a few steps, then caught it again. She repeated that a couple more times. Then, when the demonstration was evidently finished, she dropped it in front of the young cat again and stood back while the "kid" figured out that she was supposed to catch it too. Now we receive several "gifts" each week -- mice, moles, and even a bunny now and then -- on the "welcome" mat at the front door. The old girl taught her well.
I have an old feral female cat that lives under the house. At the same time we had a male house cat . One day the male brought in a dead rat and at same ttime we found a dead squirrel on the other side of the house by the back door. I suspect the two of them were competing for our attention.

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Old 05-04-2019, 12:49 AM
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Originally Posted by bunkerbuster View Post
Our BOL barn cat is a one cat swat team - when it comes to catching mice, voles, etc.

Looks just like my cute young cat. I call her "an attractive nuisance".

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Old 05-07-2019, 12:00 AM
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I used to have a cat. We weren't great "parents," didn't learn much about cats, and treated him kind of however we wanted. But he was a great hunter, even though he wasn't an angry guy, I guess.

I can agree with the experience of previous commenters, that hunting has to do at least partly with personality.

We didn't stiff him on food, didn't do anything to try to get him to be a hunter. It was just the luck of the draw. We let him be an outdoors cat, and he just decided he wanted to kill every mouse and rabbit he could get his hands on. He just constantly killed them. I wouldn't have known we had so many around, if he weren't up to that.

He also was very territorial, I guess, since he fought other tomcats a lot, too.

Maybe you can try to get kittens from a litter born to parents that like to hunt?

As far as traps, I've used glue traps and ol school traps, and they both work. Sometimes you catch mice, and sometimes you don't. You don't have to bait them, either. I think success has more to do with putting them places that mice like to go--- along walls and between furniture--- and putting two or three traps besides each other, instead of leaving one trap alone.

Ol school traps are kind of tricky, though. You have to be really careful with them, and figure them out, or it could be easy to get hurt.

Ol school rat traps look very dangerous. I think a cat--- or a person--- could easily get hurt badly by one by accident. What's true of a mouse trap is all the more true of a rat trap.

I've also used poison a bit, and thought it helped out. I threw a lot of it into a crawlspace.

Your problem sounds amazingly horrible. Besides all the above advice, I'm just thinking maybe you could somehow establish foxes, ferrets, or something similar there???

And how about keeping your LTS food on a shelf off of the ground, and maybe putting a light coat of oil on the portion of the shelf that's below it, so the rodents can't climb it?

And write to / petition your local government to fix the problem, maybe by collecting your garbage more frequently...
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Old 05-07-2019, 12:08 AM
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I saw something really interesting in a store. It's one of those "better mousetrap" or "green solution" or "cruelty free" things.

It's a bag of food that rodents will be interested enough to eat. But once they try eating it, they somehow can tell it's less nutritious than they want it to be. When the rodents eat it, they decide your area is awful, and they leave.

Neat!

I didn't buy it, because I thought it was a little expensive, but ever since then, I was wondering if it's actually a better solution than killing them.
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Old 05-07-2019, 08:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim from 28DaysLater View Post
I saw something really interesting in a store. It's one of those "better mousetrap" or "green solution" or "cruelty free" things.

It's a bag of food that rodents will be interested enough to eat. But once they try eating it, they somehow can tell it's less nutritious than they want it to be. When the rodents eat it, they decide your area is awful, and they leave.

Neat!

I didn't buy it, because I thought it was a little expensive, but ever since then, I was wondering if it's actually a better solution than killing them.

Instead of fighting someone to the death and to the last soldier, why not fool him into thinking he's in the wrong place? Then it's his own logic that's making him go away. You couldn't have a more powerful motivator or a more thorough solution than that, right?
`

Maybe we can place these along our southern border.

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Old 05-08-2019, 04:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim from 28DaysLater View Post
a bag of food that rodents will be interested enough to eat. But once they try eating it, they somehow can tell it's less nutritious than they want it to be. When the rodents eat it, they decide your area is awful, and they leave.
Did you read the ingredients?
GMO corn and the like?



Reckon it would deter these things?

Cats won't hunt them...
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Old 05-11-2019, 07:47 AM
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The poison is working, but the smell of dead rodents under the floor boards is something else. As far as I can tell there is only one adult left and 1 very small rodent - about mouse sized. Hopefully we can get rid of those two in the next week or so.
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Old 05-13-2019, 01:59 PM
Random_Signal Random_Signal is offline
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Whatever you do, DON'T USE POISON IF YOU HAVE A HUNTER YOU WANT TO KEEP. Whether pet or wild predator, poisoned prey will poison the predator.
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Old 05-13-2019, 02:01 PM
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Armadillos eat Fire Ants. They are about the only thing that does. Are you sure you want to deter them?
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:21 AM
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It wasn't my choice to use the poison, that was the other resident of the house. He brought said stuff and placed it, before I got home from work. I much prefer the conventional and old fashioned slam traps, they are quick and you have the body to dispose of.

Due to the poison being scattered about, we now have a major cleaning job to remove it before any feline is adopted, plus whenever we lift the floor boards we are going to have skeletons (or worse) to dispose of.

The mouse is dead, we just have a rat to kill. I hope the poison gets that one.

So here's the run down:

Slam Traps - reusable (1 kill per night), quick and have the body to dispose of, thus getting rid of the smell.

Poison - Will poison everything including secondary animals, the rats crawl away and die very slowly (it takes hours), the dead bodies smell to high heaven (think the worse sweaty socks you can think of),

Cats - independent, most will catch rodents if kept with their mothers long enough, can be trainable, can catch multiple rodents in one night unlike the slam traps.

Dogs - as above, but need walking but slightly more trainable then cats.
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Old 05-14-2019, 08:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Random_Signal View Post
Armadillos eat Fire Ants. They are about the only thing that does. Are you sure you want to deter them?
And they also dig up yellow jacket nests...

Neither of which bother me as much as the armadillos.

Fire ants and yellow jackets are actually beneficial in the garden....

Armadillo dig up the plants, and eat the garden help.... Hard enough to create conditions that build earthworm populations, without the armadillos digging holes everywhere... And killing the help...

One year when I was setting the alarm every hour and getting up to hunt armadillo all night long, they dug the same plants out of the bed over and over each time I checked...

How would you like to replant the same plants 5 or 6 times during the night?

And... After killing the dumb ones.... They get really amazingly smart!

And... Each time I repaired the fence... They tore through in another spot...

Never got a minute's respite!

Easier to just set the trap where they come through...
You can't bait them...

And.... I can't make work... the suggestions of laying some boards out so they follow those into the trap....

Out in tx where they belong.... They aren't so bad.... Here where they're invasives? Horrible!
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:38 PM
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Outdoor- as opposed to indoor- cats who are not well fed by humans can be rodent killing machines.

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Old 05-15-2019, 10:05 AM
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We once had a cat who brought a muskrat up from the creek, over a fence, and up five steps to the front porch. It was very dead at the time. This cat also would leave us the best organs to dispose of in the morning. (he really didn't like kidneys and stomachs).

The cats we've got now? Not so much with the hunting. They'll go for mice, but rats...no way. We had them last year, and I ended up having to poison them (the rats, not the cats), as they made a hot mess in my food storage area, and the cats were ineffective. Luckily for me, they staggered their way to the basement floor for easy clean up when they died. Showed them to the cats, who took one look and ran, lol.

There's a new kitty in the neighborhood, though who is very...pushy is probably a good word. She ran from our one outdoor cat right into my kitchen, then my neighbor found her in her car (had the tailgate up to take out some plants), and she chases my chickens. She's probably a great hunter!
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Old 05-15-2019, 11:45 AM
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This is actually ratting, but I wonder if it might help:

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Old 05-15-2019, 12:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puttster View Post
Is there such a thing as a small electric fence? A wire maybe 5-10 feet long to prevent rat access.
yes

make one

jeeze lahweezs

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Old 05-17-2019, 11:58 AM
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That video reminds me of being a kid and helping to unload the corn cribs; the dog would stand by and get those mice and rat nests in one gulp, little pink babies went right down. The mothers would flee for the field and sometimes get chased. That dog lived for those nests. Best part of his day.
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