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Old 02-13-2014, 08:16 PM
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I do a lot of canning we have 1 acre garden and I also can chicken and pork when I find it on sale. A large canner helps cut down the work a lot because you can process larger batches. Meat is actually one of the easiest things to can much less prep work. I can fill the 14 quarts my canner holds in about 30 minutes and have them in the canner it will take about 3hr from the time I put it in until I take it out but I can do other things while it is processing. If you question the value of canning tomatoes you have never tasted a real tomatoe the red things they sell in stores tast nothing like a tomatoe.
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Old 02-13-2014, 08:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kokosmom2 View Post
That is a good point. Plus the water costs, fertilizer/compost, tools, etc. I think gardening can be expensive in the beginning.

But it's the great taste and no chemicals that I really like when I can food.
My wife has me spoiled! Home grown, home style cooking, ummmmmmm!

I understand she gets tired of cooking, burnt out, needs a night off. So we load up and go out? There is nothing, nothing , that can change your mind like a easy meal at the yuppie restaurant that taste like crap! You want to stand up and demand your money back.
The Amish restaurants in our neck of the woods has this home style cooking lore that attracts the working people who cannot cook, are used to eating from a microwave, and frozen dinners. I hear from co-workers how good these place are? You just want to ask, "doesn't anybody know how to cook in your house?"
It really is the home canned food, home style recipes, and good seasonings that make "comfort foods".
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Old 02-13-2014, 08:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vedhead10 View Post
... I have about six months of food stored for my family but working towards a year
I going to step out on a limb here, 'Southern Jersey' I guess means urban ?

So your 6 months of food was, I guess store-bought.



Quote:
... I keep an assortment of foods but mostly its the emergency long term dried food. Its simple and last 15 years plus if stored correctly. And as most of you know, store bought canned foods last way longer then the expiration date. So if you are into canning, whats your opinion on how its cheaper or easier?
If you were growing a large portion of your food, then canning is a very good way to preserve that food.

However if you do not produce food, if your focus is on store-bought food. Then canning is likely not a good choice for you.
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Old 02-13-2014, 09:23 PM
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Is canning worth it? ABSOLUTELY! I grow most of m own veggies, so my canner and dehydrator get a workout, and my freezer is full, as well. Since I don't like a lot of the garbage they put in commercially canned foods (HFCS and/or sugar in SPAGHETTI SAUCE? You gotta be kidding me!) I make a lot of my own from scratch and can it. fruits and veggies, too. This past Christmas, I finally got an All American canner. Yes, it was expensive, and YES, it was worth it
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Old 02-13-2014, 09:39 PM
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I like to can things I cannot find easily or those things that I don't care for when commercially canned. Meatloaf, Meatballs, Stews, Baked beans, Sausage, hot dogs and plenty more. I have a lot of mouths to feed and preplan breakfast lunch and dinner menus, and then can what I will need to make those meals. We also have lots of wheat, rice, pasta, beans, peas and lentils. We combine freeze dried, home canned, store bought items for short, medium and long term storage and use.
It's amazing how many adjuncts are out there and needed for recipes…..Eggs, butter, milk, margarine shortening, broths, gravies, sauces, corn meal, corn flour baking soda baking powder etc etc etc…..Sometimes it seems endless. I just keep plugging away at the list every payday and little by little see good progress…keep after it.

Ditto the All American canner I started with a cheap Wally Mart canner and eventually got the AA which is great as it has much higher capacity…Love It
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Old 02-13-2014, 09:51 PM
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Canning your own is NOT ABOUT MONEY. It is all about being independent from the grocery store. So, you buy all your stores, do you have enough to last the rest of your life??? So when your stores are used up, what if you can't go to a grocery anymore and buy some more.

Gardening, canning, raising poultry may cost a little more today, but the skills to do these things is invaluable, and you had better have them when SHTF because they take time to acquire.
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Old 02-13-2014, 09:57 PM
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I learned to can last year. Bought an inexpensive pressure cooker and have been canning ever since.

I can lots of boneless skinless chicken breasts bought on sale. Probably 3 large breasts per quart. I put up 36-48 quarts at a time.

I also can pinto beans as well as keep them in storage bags dry.

I consider the jars and lids as an investment not unlike bullets, band aids and beans. When they come into stock I just fill my cart full and stack cases of jars at home til they are used up.

I have lots of canned potato's, carrots, and misc items. Nice to know if the power goes out... there will be lots of meat NOT going to spoil. I also dehydrate potatoes, corn, onions ect. So there are plenty of choices if need be.
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Old 02-13-2014, 10:54 PM
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I didn't read every reply so my words may have, and probably have already been said.

Food grown in good, healthy, uncontaminated soil, properly cared for while growing, prepared and canned in a clean kitchen and seasoned just exactly to suit personal taste, is so far superior to most foods from grocery stores that you just can't compare them side by side.

And home cooked food made with meat, eggs, dairy, fruit, and vegetables you grow, fresh or canned, makes restaurant food seem very poor. Restaurant food frequently gives me heartburn, a stomach ache, and often even diarrhea. I never, and I mean never, get those symptoms from eating what I grow and can and cook myself. Plus, I know my food is clean and uncontaminated from the time I plant the seed to the time I sit down to eat the final cooked or fresh product. I don't have to worry if someone with a pus filled cut on their hand makes my salad or tacos, or if the person carrying my food to my table has tuberculosis while they're coughing everywhere (yep, t.b. is not at all uncommon in border states). I go to restaurants every now and then, but not too often.

So yeah, it's work, but I can provide more food per dollar spent than I ever could buy with that same money.

It's like heating with wood. Once the wood stove pays for itself in use, your home heat is free except for the work of getting the wood. It's work, like canning is work, but it's very cost effective.
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Old 02-13-2014, 11:53 PM
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I would definitely start with simple. Learn hot-water-bath canning first. Master that skill set. There are many things that you can preserve in that manner.

Then later you can extend your skills into pressure-cooker canning.

That was what my wife did.
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Old 02-14-2014, 12:28 AM
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Yep, canning is one skill of several to preserve food, anytime.
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Old 02-14-2014, 12:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vedhead10 View Post
So if you are into canning, whats your opinion on how its cheaper or easier?
In many areas, it is not cheaper for my family. We still buy canned corn and green beans others.....

We could perhaps buy tomato products cheaper, but ours taste awesome, and it's a cycle that only requires seeds, rain, sun and canning supplies, fun to be self sufficient.

Where we are definitely saving money is canning soups, chili, meats.
We just got an All American pressure canner, this thing will pay for itself with what we will be able to put up this year vs. buying commercially available products. And ours won't have nitrates, MSG, and other random chemicals.

I know it is work and it takes time to prep all the stuff, but I was already at work for 60 hours by the time Saturday morning comes, I'm done with that. To us it's not work, we all do it together, involve the kid, make it fun.

So part of it does save us money, most of it has to do with being self sufficient and having the ability to store food without commercial canned chemicals.

It may not seem "easier" when you are doing it, but I like having quart jars of my wife's chicken soup.
It's not frozen, I'm feeling lazy or I'm rushed on my way out the door to work I can grab a container of homemade food that is ready to go. That saved me time.
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Old 02-14-2014, 01:05 AM
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Food prices are on the rise. Learning to garden, and to preserve your produce via canning, dehydrating, etc., is a valuable skill and takes practice (better to take on that learning curve BEFORE it is a necessity).
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Old 02-14-2014, 01:15 AM
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Is canning really worth it???? Is a bullfrogs butt water tight????
We mostly can wild deer and hogs that I kill in hunting season and chicken I catch on sale. I dont see much calorie value in canning (pressure canning) garden vegetables, to much time and fuel energy per calorie. I do make a few batches of pickles and try to can a hundred pints of tomato stuff every year. Salsa,sauce,rotel, etc. tomatoes are a big cooking base at our place
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Old 02-14-2014, 01:24 AM
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It's worth it because I thoroughly enjoy doing it. Started out as a hobby and turned into a lifestyle.
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Old 02-14-2014, 01:25 AM
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Yes it's worth knowing that you can pronounce the name of every ingredient you put in your jars.
Example, Applesauce. Ingredient list: Apples.
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Old 02-14-2014, 08:43 AM
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As career military, there have been many times for us when home canning was not worth the effort.

But then suddenly there would be local peaches being harvested and you could get them for real cheap. So buying a bunch and canning 30-quarts made good sense.

If you are not a food producer, there will still be times when it does make sense to be doing it.

Plus it is a good skill to learn and practice.

Start simple. Learn the easy stuff first.
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Old 02-14-2014, 08:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bilmac View Post
Canning your own is NOT ABOUT MONEY. It is all about being independent from the grocery store. So, you buy all your stores, do you have enough to last the rest of your life??? So when your stores are used up, what if you can't go to a grocery anymore and buy some more.

Gardening, canning, raising poultry may cost a little more today, but the skills to do these things is invaluable, and you had better have them when SHTF because they take time to acquire.
This is, I think, the best answer yet. Is it worth the time and effort? For me yes, only you can answer that question for you. However, is store bought stuff sustainable, renewable, annual? Do you control the proccesses and contents? Do you determine whats available and when?

We can for all those reasons and more. Think throught the ENTIRE process, I think you'll find your answer is......YES
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Old 02-14-2014, 09:46 AM
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Nothing feels or tastes as good as being able to walk to your shelf in the middle of the hardest winter, and pull down a jar of peaches. Especially when that jar is from the peaches that you grew in your own back yard, and you know that there are no harmful chemicals in them.

It's like a mouth full of sunshine with every bite! Let me tell you, it makes the winter just a little easier to handle.

With that in mind, let me share a recipe with you that my wife and I have been using with our home grown and canned peaches. These are soooo good!!!

It calls for eating them with ham, but they are wonderful just by themselves served up with some home made whipped cream!


This is from Nigella Lawson. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/n...es-recipe.html

Spiced Peaches

Ingredients

2 (14-ounce) cans peach halves in syrup
1 tablespoon rice vinegar or white wine vinegar
2 short sticks cinnamon
1 1/2 -inch piece ginger, peeled and sliced thinly into rounds
1/2 teaspoon crushed dried chili flakes
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt or 1/4 teaspoon table salt
1/4 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
3 whole cloves

Directions

Empty the cans of peaches into a saucepan with their syrup. Add the vinegar, cinnamon, sliced ginger, chiles, salt, whole peppercorns and cloves. Bring the pan to the boil, and let boil for a minute or so then turn off the heat and leave it in the pan to keep warm.

Serve the peaches with a hot ham letting people take a peach half and some of the spiced juice. Any leftovers can (and should) be stored in a jar and refrigerated and then eaten cold with cold ham
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Old 02-14-2014, 09:55 AM
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One thing several people have touched on is learning a skill that may come in very handy in the future.

You wouldn't buy a gun and leave it sitting in its case would you?
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Old 02-14-2014, 09:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SgtBooker44 View Post
Yes it's worth knowing that you can pronounce the name of every ingredient you put in your jars.
Example, Applesauce. Ingredient list: Apples.
yeppers
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